Liz Jones

Reporter

Liz Jones is a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration and diversity issues. Her work has taken her to central Mexico, where she produced an award-winning documentary about immigration and indigenous communities.

Previously, Liz worked as an editor and writer for Oxygen Media in New York.

One of Liz’s greatest challenges is staying put. She’s lived in Spain and Peru and loves to travel. But she finds a good radio story can often satisfy the travel bug – you get to meet new people, make sense out of something unfamiliar and find creative ways to communicate.

Her work has been heard on NPR and other national programs, including The World, Latino USA and Weekend America.

In her spare time she enjoys spending time with family, making jam, snowboarding and watching every filmed version of "Pride and Prejudice" over and over and over again.

Ways To Connect

Liz Jones / KUOW

Mike Peroni knows what it’s like to live through a disaster. In 2007, a massive flood wiped out his home and farm in Curtis, Wash., about 40 miles south of Olympia.

For him, stories from the tragic landslide near Oso, Wash., on March 22 have hit an emotional scar.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A steady protest has hung over an immigration lockup in Tacoma for more than a month.

In March, hundreds of detainees went on hunger strike. Outside the gates, families and supporters have gathered daily, waving signs that read “No More Deportations.”

A large crowd is expected outside the facility again this Saturday, as part of a national campaign. The protest has grown out of frustration about an impasse on immigration reform as detainees fight to avoid deportation and separation from their families.

‘I Wouldn’t Be Another Number’

Flickr Photo/Meg (CC BY-NC-ND)

When you walk past a restaurant in Seattle, you’re most likely not aware of the health and safety standards inside. But Seattle and King County Public Health is currently cooking up a plan to change that with a new rating system, which may include signs on restaurant windows.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Several immigrants being held at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma have been moved to isolation after a recent hunger strike at the facility.

Twitter Photo/Deb Slater

KUOW reporter Liz Jones speaks with Justin Rabung, who works a couple of blocks away from where a KOMO News helicopter crashed on Tuesday morning.

Also, Steve Scher speaks with Larry Welk about the technical aspects of the helicopter that was involved in the crash. Welk has been a helicoper pilot for 15 years and has a company in Los Angeles called Angel City Air which operates news helicopters.

Courtesy of Angel Rabang

This weekend’s tribal council election on the Nooksack reservation near Bellingham leaves an uncertain future for hundreds of its members. The tribe has sought to remove about 15 percent of its people in what would be the largest tribal disenrollment in Washington state’s history.

KUOW Photo/Meghan Walker

Members of the Nooksack tribe near Bellingham will cast votes in a high-stakes election this Saturday. The outcome could change the fate for hundreds of members facing disenrollment from the tribe.

This membership controversy within the Nooksack Tribe surfaced about a year ago. The tribal council questioned the ancestry of 306 members, about 15 percent of the tribe, and moved to disenroll them.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

As a hunger strike continues at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, a new federal court ruling coincidentally meets one of the protesters' demands.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

More than a hundred detainees at an immigration lockup in Tacoma are entering their fifth day without food. The hunger strike began Friday, with about 750 people refusing to eat.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement has stepped up medical observations for the protesters.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Immigration officials say a lockdown has been lifted at a Tacoma detention center where hundreds of detainees are involved in a hunger strike.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement say the lockdown that started Sunday at the area of the Northwest Detention Center holding violent offenders was a precaution. 

Flickr Photo/Crash Zone Photography

A new policy for the Seattle Police Department aims to change how officers handle crisis situations with people who are mentally ill or under the influence. The crisis intervention policy, which takes effect Monday, is part of the city’s federally-mandated police reforms.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Washington state students who are in the country illegally have reason to celebrate. On Wednesday, Governor Jay Inslee signed into law the state’s Real Hope Act, also commonly called the DREAM Act.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

On a recent afternoon, about a dozen Somali women talk in spurts as they weave 4-inch metal needles through a basket.

It doesn't look like therapy, but in a way, it is.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Milton Cornejo locked arms with about a dozen demonstrators Monday morning to block access to the federal Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma.

They were among about 50 people trying to prevent vehicles from leaving the facility, saying that they didn’t want the vans leaving with people who are about to be deported on board.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

On a clear day in Seattle, Nick Bond can size up the mountain snowpack on his bike ride to work at the University of Washington. However, in his role as the state’s climatologist, Bond crunches the data to get a much more precise picture. That’s because a lot of people care about snowpack.

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