Liz Jones

Reporter

Liz Jones is a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration and diversity issues. Her work has taken her to central Mexico, where she produced an award-winning documentary about immigration and indigenous communities.

Previously, Liz worked as an editor and writer for Oxygen Media in New York.

One of Liz’s greatest challenges is staying put. She’s lived in Spain and Peru and loves to travel. But she finds a good radio story can often satisfy the travel bug – you get to meet new people, make sense out of something unfamiliar and find creative ways to communicate.

Her work has been heard on NPR and other national programs, including The World, Latino USA and Weekend America.

In her spare time she enjoys spending time with family, making jam, snowboarding and watching every filmed version of "Pride and Prejudice" over and over and over again.

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Memorial Day is just one of many days throughout the year when the American flag is lowered to half-staff. The President of the United States and state governors can also order flags lowered during times of mourning.

In Washington state, flags have flown at half-staff three times so far in 2014 to honor local soldiers who died on active duty. In April, Governor Jay Inslee also ordered to lower the flags for a week in memory of the victims of the tragic Oso landslide.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

In October 2012, Seattle’s local government expanded in a way typically only seen in bigger cities. Former mayor Mike McGinn created the Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, or OIRA, in an effort to give more voice to the area’s booming immigrant population. Nearly 20 percent of Seattle’s residents are born outside of the U.S., according to recent census figures.

Flickr Photo/Canadian Pacific

Efforts to prevent King County Metro bus cuts have narrowed from a county-wide approach to a more localized strategy.  On Tuesday, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray unveiled his proposal to give Seattle voters another option to save Seattle-centric routes, although he's still got his eye on a broader, regional plan.

In the “me too” department, King County is jumping on the bandwagon to consider a higher minimum wage for its employees. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray issued a similar proposal for city workers soon after he took office in January.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

A hunger strike at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma recently ended after nearly two months, but the ripple effects continue. U.S. Congressman Adam Smith, D-Bellevue, plans to introduce a bill Thursday that would change how federal agencies operate and audit detention centers.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

There’s no special handshake. No code word. But for one secret group on the University of Washington campus in Seattle, identification papers – or, rather, a lack thereof – are a common denomination.

The UW’s student organization the Purple Group is for students, known as "dreamers," who came to the country illegally, often as young children.

EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Tribal leaders in the Puget Sound area gathered on Bainbridge Island Thursday for a summit about top issues in Indian Country. They were joined with U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to discuss federal priorities.

Courtesy of Wayne Buck

When there’s daylight in Seattle, it’s usually night time in Ukraine. But that time difference doesn't matter to many Ukrainians here, who are anxious for news of the crisis unfolding in their motherland.

“We have 32 channels from Ukraine so we can watch every day,” said Peter Drogomiretskiy during a recent interview at his home in Brier, Wash. He sometimes watches Ukrainian news coverage with his wife, Valha Drogomiretskiy, until 3 a.m. and only sleeps a few hours before work.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A Seattle group seeking a $15 minimum wage has filed paperwork to put the issue to voters. The move aims to increase pressure on Mayor Ed Murray and the City Council to pass a measure this year.

Flickr Photo/Skip&Nell (CC BY-NC-ND)

You’ve probably heard the slogan “Click It or Ticket” to promote seatbelt safety. Now, Washington state is joining in a new national campaign to target people who text and drive.

Special patrols will be out statewide, starting Thursday, with a new snappy slogan to add: “U-Drive, U-Text, U-Pay.”

Liz Jones / KUOW

Mike Peroni knows what it’s like to live through a disaster. In 2007, a massive flood wiped out his home and farm in Curtis, Wash., about 40 miles south of Olympia.

For him, stories from the tragic landslide near Oso, Wash., on March 22 have hit an emotional scar.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A steady protest has hung over an immigration lockup in Tacoma for more than a month.

In March, hundreds of detainees went on hunger strike. Outside the gates, families and supporters have gathered daily, waving signs that read “No More Deportations.”

A large crowd is expected outside the facility again this Saturday, as part of a national campaign. The protest has grown out of frustration about an impasse on immigration reform as detainees fight to avoid deportation and separation from their families.

‘I Wouldn’t Be Another Number’

Flickr Photo/Meg (CC BY-NC-ND)

When you walk past a restaurant in Seattle, you’re most likely not aware of the health and safety standards inside. But Seattle and King County Public Health is currently cooking up a plan to change that with a new rating system, which may include signs on restaurant windows.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Several immigrants being held at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma have been moved to isolation after a recent hunger strike at the facility.

Twitter Photo/Deb Slater

KUOW reporter Liz Jones speaks with Justin Rabung, who works a couple of blocks away from where a KOMO News helicopter crashed on Tuesday morning.

Also, Steve Scher speaks with Larry Welk about the technical aspects of the helicopter that was involved in the crash. Welk has been a helicoper pilot for 15 years and has a company in Los Angeles called Angel City Air which operates news helicopters.

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