Liz Jones

Reporter

Liz Jones is a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration and diversity issues. Her work has taken her to central Mexico, where she produced an award-winning documentary about immigration and indigenous communities.

Previously, Liz worked as an editor and writer for Oxygen Media in New York.

One of Liz’s greatest challenges is staying put. She’s lived in Spain and Peru and loves to travel. But she finds a good radio story can often satisfy the travel bug – you get to meet new people, make sense out of something unfamiliar and find creative ways to communicate.

Her work has been heard on NPR and other national programs, including The World, Latino USA and Weekend America.

In her spare time she enjoys spending time with family, making jam, snowboarding and watching every filmed version of "Pride and Prejudice" over and over and over again.

Ways To Connect

The RajGuru family was one of the first Indian families to move to Redmond in 1969. Matriarch Madhavi Rajguru's saris would often inspire curiosity.
Courtesy of Devki Rajguru

REDMOND, WASHINGTON – Long before Microsoft set up its headquarters here, and before the 520 highway extended this far, the RajGuru family moved to this Seattle suburb they knew almost nothing about. The year was 1969.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Kenneth Bae’s family got the call they had been waiting for early Saturday morning. 

North Korea had freed him. 

Later that night, his plane touched down at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, a military base south of Seattle. 

Liz Jones / KUOW

A federal lawsuit filed in Seattle Thursday highlights alleged document tampering in immigration cases. The lawsuit claims that government officials forged documents in a local deportation case, and attorneys who filed the case are calling for a broad investigation.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A new fleet of bicycles will start rolling down Seattle streets Monday when the city’s bike share program gets underway. The bright green bikes will be easy to spot and 500 of them will be stationed across Seattle’s urban core: downtown, the University of Washington and Capitol Hill.

AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File

“Sobering” is how Washington Governor Jay Inslee summed up a draft report about the risks of increased oil transport through the state.  In the report, the State Department of Ecology describes an unprecedented growth in this local transport, from virtually no trains carrying crude oil in 2011 to 714 million gallons in 2013.

The recession may be over, but King County’s budget is still hurting. County Executive Dow Constantine rolled out his 2015-16 budget proposal Monday, saying deep cuts are needed because revenues continue to trail far behind expenses.

We're Staying In Oso, But Every Day We Say Goodbye

Sep 21, 2014
Return to Oso
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Ron Thompson was known as the mayor of Steelhead Drive. He and his wife Gail Thompson lost their home and many neighbors in the Oso landslide. But they’ve decided to stay in Oso, and start over in a new home just four miles from the old one. They find hope in rebuilding their community while striving to find meaning in the disaster.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Some leaders of a recent hunger strike at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma had their day in immigration court this week.

This week in Seattle, a 10-year-old boy is scheduled to appear in immigration court along with his teenage brother and sister. The siblings fled to the United States to escape violence after gang members in El Salvador killed their father. Now they all face deportation, but no lawyer will represent them in court.

Courtesy Jorge Lerma

As Jorge Lerma approached the Mexican border from the U.S. side, he felt like he was hooked to a bungee cord, ready to leap into the unknown.

Jorge had lived in the U.S. for 16 years, attended high school and college in California, but his status here as an undocumented immigrant thwarted his dreams to be an engineer. So he decided to move back to Mexico.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Jorge Lerma sorts through his neckties. Dozens are draped across the couch; others get tossed into the give-away pile. 

Jorge rents a tiny room at this house in Bellevue, Washington. The landlord pops in to check out possible bargains and buys a flat-screen TV and a light-weight tripod. The discard pile shrinks, but on top remains a crisp American flag that Jorge used to hang in his room.

AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, Pool

Hundreds of immigrant children held at the southern border could be moved to a military base near Tacoma.

Federal and local officials plan to discuss the option Wednesday.

The federal government continues to struggle with a flood of immigrant children arriving at the U.S. border with Mexico. Today, a class-action suit filed in Seattle seeks additional legal help for these and all other children who face possible deportation.

Legal experts in Washington state are still assessing Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling regarding labor unions. At issue is whether unions can require home health care workers to pay certain dues and fees. And, as KUOW’s Liz Jones reports, Washington is one of a handful of states where this ruling could apply.

TRANSCRIPT

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

A flood of immigrant children arriving at the border with Mexico could end up in Washington state at Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma.

Pages