Liz Jones | KUOW News and Information

Liz Jones

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2006

Liz reports on immigration and emerging communities for KUOW. Her work covers issues within our region’s growing immigrant and refugee populations, as well as stories connected to minority groups with a longer history in the area.

She comes to KUOW after several years at an online news startup, which was later bought by Oxygen Media in New York.  Her last position there was health editor for the network’s website.

Liz has also lived in Spain and Peru and speaks Spanish. She is a graduate of the University of Washington, with a degree in communications.

Liz’s work for KUOW has taken her to Mexico and India. Both those reporting trips produced award-winning documentaries. In 2009, Liz received a regional Murrow award for a documentary about indigenous Mexicans who migrate to the Seattle area. In 2014, she won a national Gracie award and RTNDA’s Kaleidoscope Award for a series that focused on immigration-related links between India and the Puget Sound region.

Her work has also been heard on national shows including NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Here & Now, PRI's The World, Latino USA, Marketplace, The Takeaway and BBC News Service.  

Ways to Connect

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Cordelia Revells anxiously peers down the arrival gate a Sea-Tac Airport.

“We’re looking for a family of six,” Revells says. “You’ll know it’s them because refugees typically carry a white and blue bag from the IOM.” (That’s the International Organization for Migration, which helps coordinate refugee travel from overseas.)


KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

It ended almost as dramatically as it began.

After working “literally around the clock” all week, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson and his team went to court against President Donald Trump Friday – and they won, securing a temporary halt to the President’s immigration ban.

Washington refugees world map
KUOW/Kara McDermott

Nearly 25,000 immigrants and refugees in Washington state could be directly affected by an order signed last week (picture SafeCo Field almost half-full). Let’s break those numbers down. 

courtesy Northwest Immigrant Rights Project

The so-called Muslim travel ban may go beyond just stopping people from certain countries at the airport.

Seattle attorneys working with immigrants and refugees have found in recent days that their clients’ paperwork has been frozen in the system.

Alaa, age 11, takes a selfie with a reporter's camera.
ALAA AL HALABI

Alaa Al Halabi's big sister was supposed to move here on Monday. 

But President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries. 

This Syrian mother does not know when her family will be reunited again. Click through for more photos taken by her 11-year-old daughter, Alaa.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

This week was meant to be a reunion for the Al Halabi family. They’re Syrian refugees who live just south of Seattle. Two grown children, still in Turkey, were set to fly here Monday. One of them is almost seven months pregnant.  But the president’s immigration ban means they’ll remain separated indefinitely.


Police look out over a growing protest at Sea-Tac International Airport, where up to 13 people have been detained one day after President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning people from seven Muslim countries.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

When officials at Sea-Tac International Airport got wind of President Donald Trump’s latest order, it came like a slap in the face.

It was just before midnight on Friday when they learned there would be a temporary – but immediate – ban on all refugees and immigrants from several majority-Muslim countries.

KUOW photo/Liz Jones

Syrian families in Washington state are devastated to learn about a new ban on fellow refugees seeking to come here.

KUOW photo/Liz Jones

Every day, newly arrived refugees just show up at Marwa Sadik’s office, at the Iraqi Community Center in Kent. Many are Iraqi, like her. Or from Syria, where she grew up.


Bill Radke speaks with KUOW reporter Liz Jones about the potential fallout from President Trump's upcoming immigration executive order.  The order will likely severely cripple the U.S. refugee program and curb immigration from the Middle East. Jones spoke with immigrant families about their fears and plans for an uncertain future. 

Fidencio Racine (in red) and Salvador Cruz came down from Mount Vernon to attend the immigration rally at Judkins Park on Friday, May 1, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Update: Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says Seattle is willing to risk money to stick to its principles.

Six days in to his presidency, Donald Trump made good on his promise Wednesday to build a wall along the southern border with Mexico.

Immigration growth
KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

“We’re going to build a wall,” President Donald Trump said at his first White House press conference. Given the controversial talking point from his campaign is now a national promise, here are a few things worth knowing:

KUOW photo/Liz Jones

More than 1,200  immigrants and refugees took up Seattle’s offer for free legal help on inauguration day, according to the city's estimate. The city organized the event to help undocumented parents and others seeking citizenship, but some found they arrived too late.


Volunteers help with citizenship forms.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

People started lining up in Seattle several hours before the city’s big immigration workshop opened its doors at noon Friday.

The city planned the event to coincide with Inauguration Day to emphasize that Seattle would remain a welcoming city for immigrants and refugees under the Trump administration.

KUOW photo/Liz Jones

The handover of presidential power makes us  wonder how the new administration will affect our lives.

That's especially true for young people.

  


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