Laurel Wamsley | KUOW News and Information

Laurel Wamsley

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department announced on Tuesday that it had confiscated 7,000 birds in the largest-ever seizure of fowl used for illegal cockfighting.

"Joke theft" sounds funny.

Unless you're a comedy writer and you see a late-night TV host telling a joke you wrote. Five times.

That's what the writer Alex Kaseberg says happened to him in late 2014 and early 2015, a charge disputed by Conan O'Brien and his lawyers.

The White House announced today that President Trump's youngest son, 11-year-old Barron, will attend the private St. Andrew's Episcopal School in Potomac, Md., this fall.

Barron and his mother, Melania Trump, have been living at Trump Tower in New York throughout Trump's presidency. The announcement ends speculation that they would remain in New York during the entire presidency; Barron will be the first presidential son to live at the White House since John F. Kennedy, Jr.

In his first major decision, newly inaugurated French President Emmanuel Macron has named conservative lawmaker Edouard Philippe as prime minister.

Today marks the launch of something both old and new in Detroit: a streetcar down Woodward Avenue. The streetcar opened to the public on Friday morning, after 10 years of planning and political wrangling.

The six streetcars make a 6.6 mile loop — 3.3 miles each way — connecting downtown Detroit with the New Center neighborhood, which was home to General Motors until it decamped downtown two decades ago.

A shooting at a nursing home in Ohio left four people dead on Friday morning. The deceased were the Kirkersville police chief, two employees of the nursing home and the suspected shooter.

The Columbus Dispatch reports:

"The chief responded to a report of a man with a gun at the Pine Kirk nursing home at 7:50 a.m. in downtown Kirkersville in western Licking County.

A few blocks east of the Brandenburg Gate, Cityhostel Berlin offers cheap rooms and spotty Wi-Fi in a large, gated 1970s building.

But it turns out the hostel is more interesting than its exterior suggests: The building is owned and leased out by North Korea.

Years from now, a girl named Alia Joy will have a claim to fame to tell at summer camp: She was the first baby to be breast-fed on the floor of Australia's Parliament.

Her mother is Greens party co-deputy leader Larissa Waters, who was returning to Parliament after giving birth to her second child, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

Cuba is not an easy place to buy things. Food is rationed, wages are low, and the black market is a way of life.

But now, Cubans can buy shirts with those little alligators on them at Lacoste. Or at L'Occitane en Provence, face cream for $162.40 an ounce. Or watches in the $10,000s.

In a decision that could have global consequences, an Austrian court ruled on Friday that Facebook must delete postings deemed to be hate speech.

The U.K. held its local elections Thursday, and a brand-new political party won its first seat.

This party is comprised of just one woman, named Sally Cogley. And it has just one issue: rubbish.

In Thursday's vote to fill three Irvine Valley places on East Ayrshire Council, Cogley came in second after the Scottish National Party candidate, enough to win a seat.

An explosion of methane gas collapsed a coal mine in Iran, killing more than 35 people and trapping others underground, according to Iranian state media. Many of those who died had rushed into help miners who were trapped.

Wednesday's blast was caused when workers tried to jump-start a locomotive, Reuters reports.

Updated at 7:55 a.m. ET Thursday

In late April, a university in Pyongyang said the North Korean government had detained one of its adjunct professors, a 50-something American who taught accounting. On Wednesday, North Korea confirmed through the official Korean Central News Agency that it had indeed detained Tony Kim, and was holding him for "hostile criminal acts with an aim to subvert the country."

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

A former police officer in North Charleston, S.C., accused in the shooting death of an unarmed black man in 2015 has pleaded guilty to a federal civil rights charge, according to his lawyer.

"I have a story to tell about something that happened to our family last week." That's how Jimmy Kimmel began an unusually heartfelt monologue on his late-night show Monday.

If the Fyre Festival had played out according to the immaculate hype of its marketing materials, attendees would be flying home from the Bahamas right about now, sunburned and hungover from the greatest weekend of their young lives, cellphones full of models' phone numbers, #latergramming their way to legend status.

Instead, at least one of those once bright-eyed festivalgoers has filed a lawsuit and ticket buyers are receiving apologies from event organizers, who now admit that the Fyre Festival "fell dramatically short of even the most modest expectations."

Perhaps you're a person who buys festival wear but finds Coachella too plebian. Perhaps you find other music festivals off-putting because you can't bring your own yacht. Or maybe you just think it sounds awesome to hang out on an island in the Bahamas and you have a few thousand dollars to blow.

The U.S. economy grew at just a 0.7 percent annual rate in the first quarter of this year, according to the latest report on the gross domestic product from the Commerce Department. That's below market expectations and indicates the economy grew at the slowest pace in three years.

Weak auto sales and lower home-heating bills dragged down consumer spending, offsetting a pickup in investment led by housing and oil drilling. Employment costs rose 0.8 percent in the first quarter.

Accessing the Internet in Cuba isn't easy. Home Internet connections are rare, and public access Wi-Fi hotspots costs $1.50 an hour — very expensive for most Cubans.

But in the nation that has been called "one of the most restrictive media environments in the world," watching YouTube got faster this week.

The annual TED conference is known for featuring impressive speakers. Attendees at this year's event in Vancouver have seen Serena Williams and Jorge Ramos, futurists and artificial intelligence experts, health activists and the ACLU's executive director.

But on Tuesday evening, one unannounced speaker took the audience by surprise: Pope Francis.

The pope was on a big screen rather than onstage, and his address had been recorded and edited earlier in April, but still: even for non-Catholics, the bishop of Rome has a certain gravitas.

In November, young boxer Amaiya Zafar traveled from Minnesota to Florida to fight her first competitive bout.

But before Zafar even had her gloves on, officials called off the fight – they told the 16-year-old she had to remove the hijab she wore or forfeit the match. A devout Muslim, Zafar refused, and her 15-year-old opponent was declared the victor.

In the 1950s, television producer Albert Freedman captivated audiences with his carefully crafted game show Twenty-One, which had been foundering before he helped turn it into the most popular program in the country.

Robert M. Pirsig, who inspired generations to road trip across America with his "novelistic autobigraphy," Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, died Monday at the age of 88.

His publisher William Morrow & Company said in a statement that Pirsig died at his home in South Berwick, Maine, "after a period of failing health."

Not all of April's showers are soggy and flower-inducing. Late April is also the season of the Lyrids, the second of the year's established meteor showers. So get thee to the rooftops and wide open fields: The shower peaks tonight.

A remark U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions made earlier this week about a judge in Hawaii isn't sitting well with the Aloha State.

In an interview on the The Mark Levin Show, Sessions was asked about the status of President Trump's executive order on travel.

In case you ever find yourself hurtling into space, know this: When the little stuffed dog starts to float, that's when you've reached Earth's orbit.

With its spindly legs, distinctive patterning, and absurdly long neck, the giraffe makes a compelling figure on the savanna. But the population of the world's tallest mammal has dropped sharply in recent decades – from about 150,000 in 1985, to fewer than 100,000 today.

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