Kim Malcolm | KUOW News and Information

Kim Malcolm

Host

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Kim began alternately hosting KUOW’s morning and afternoon news magazines in early 2015. She started at KUOW as a fill-in newscaster, after working at KERA in Dallas as a local All Things Considered host, reporter and talk show host.

Kim started in public radio at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as an associate producer and worked in Calgary and Edmonton Alberta. A transplanted Canadian, she is a graduate of the University of Calgary and Concordia University in Montreal, with a graduate diploma in journalism.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Michael Maddux, Kim Malcolm and John Carlson.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Amazon is donating a building a temporary homeless shelter in Seattle. What role should the business community play in solving homelessness? Also, the troubled Western State Hospital has a new CEO. Will that help solve it's problems? And, should Washington ditch the sales tax in favor of an income tax?

Kim Malcolm chats over the news of the week with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KVI's John Carlson and Michael Maddux, chair of the King County Young Democrats.

Yakima City Council (clockwise from top left): Mayor Avina Gutierrez, Holly Cousens, Carmen Mendez, Dulce Gutierrez, Maureen Adkison, Bill Lover, and Kathy Coffey.
Yakima City Council

Kim Malcolm speaks with Yakima City Councilmember Carmen Mendez about how the city is dealing with five gun deaths in the last two weeks.  

The romance of vinyl records.
Flickr Photo/Jonas Smith (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qtdqN5

Kim Malcolm talks to Martin Feveyear, music producer and mixer for Jupiter Recording Studio in Seattle, about why vinyl records have withstood the rise of digital musical.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Kim Malcolm talks to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about Amazon's announcement that it will be turning one of its vacant South Lake Union buildings into a homeless shelter in partnership with Mary's Place. 

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times Reporter Ángel González about Amazon's announcement that it will establish a temporary shelter for homeless families near their South Lake Union headquarters.

The online retail giant will partner with local homeless service provider Mary's Place to temporarily re-purpose an existing real estate holding — an empty Travelodge — while the land it sits on waits to be developed. The shelter will house around 60-70 homeless families for one year.

Kim Malcolm speaks with AP reporter Martha Belisle about the problems at Washington state's largest psychiatric hospital and why Governor Jay Inslee fired the chief of Western State Hospital.

Rebecca Yeung (left), and Kimberly Yeung retrieve the Loki Lego Launcher outside Ritzville, WA, after the ballooncraft returned from the stratosphere.
Courtesy of the Yeung Family

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle sisters Rebecca, 11, and Kimberly Yeung, 9, about bringing their "spacecraft," the Loki Lego Launcher, to the White House Science Fair

Before the White House, the Loki Lego Launcher was just a family project. The girls built the craft at home, with equipment and instructions they found online. They made it out of plywood, arrow shafts, rope, a helium balloon and some styrofoam feet "in the event of a water landing." 

Equal Pay Day pin
Flickr Photo/Michael Panse (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/mhQxLC

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle resident Ruchika Tulshyan, author of "The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In The Workplace," about why companies and managers should be taking the lead on closing the gender pay gap.

The main entrance of Western State Hospital in Lakewood, Wash.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Kim Malcolm talks with state Rep. Laurie Jinkins (D-Tacoma) about the problems facing Western State Hospital and why she believes adding staff and raising pay is a big part of the solution.

Boeing handout.

The Boeing Company is expected to cut 4,000 jobs by June, with further cuts possible later in the year. The company announced plans to trim the workforce about six weeks ago and the scope of those job cuts is now becoming clear. 

Richard Aboulafia is an aerospace analyst with the Teal Group. He said there are some pressures on Boeing's bottom line and that could explain their desire to cut jobs and cut costs.

File photo of a hand gun.
Flickr Photo/Zorin Denu (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Stephanie Ervin, campaign manager for a statewide initiative campaign that would allow a person to petition a court for an extreme risk protection order which would have a family member's firearms temporarily taken away and prevent that person from purchasing new guns.

Recruits from around the region, including Seattle Police Department, on the first day at the police academy.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kim Malcolm talks with King County Sheriff John Urquhart about a proposed law that would allow any legal Washington resident – not just American citizens – to become a police officer.

Highline school bus driver Rodger Fowler shows off his stop paddle – and (in the lower-right corner) the camera that captures motorists who ignore the paddle.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Kim Malcolm talks with education reporter Ann Dornfeld about how levies and bond measures in the Puget Sound area are faring after last night's ballot returns. Nearly half of Washington's 295 school districts asked voters for more money in the special election. 

That road was covered by 15 feet of snow in the Snoqualmie Pass area. (The road is still six feet under the excavator.) More than 112 inches of snow have fallen in the last seven days.
Washington State Department of Transportation

Update, 10 a.m., Dec. 26, 2015: The Washington state Department of Transportation tweeted early Christmas Day that Interstate 90 westbound had reopened. The eastbound lanes had reopened a few hours earlier.

A Google map shows the outline of the North Seattle eruv.
KUOW Staff

After the sun sets on Fridays, Orthodox Jews may not push a stroller. Nor may they carry tissues or books outside their homes.

But there’s a loophole: People who live within certain neighborhood boundaries may carry books and babies outside.

Kim Malcolm talks to Sheila Capestany about the King County program Best Starts For Kids. Capestany is in charge of overseeing the implementation of the program. Voters approved a six-year levy on the November ballot that will fund the program. 

A homeless camp beneath an Interstate 5 off-ramp in Seattle's SODO district.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Kim Malcom talks to Daniel Malone, executive director of the Downtown Emergency Service Center, about why Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's emergency plan on homelessness doesn't go far enough.

Cape Flattery on Washington's coast.
Flickr Photo/ravas51 (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1k8ROw2

Kim Malcolm talks to Dr. Kirk Johnson, sant director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, about the geological wonders of the West Coast and his new NOVA special "Making North America." 

A blighted house on Northeast 65th in Seattle in the Roosevelt neighborhood.
Flicrk Photo/Steve Mohundro (CC BY NC SA)/http://bit.ly/1ZRXDyb

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle City Council member Nick Licata about why he co-sponsored a measure to protect renters from slumlords. 

Starving prisoners in Mauthausen camp liberated on 5 May 1945.
Public Domain

Kim Malcolm talks to Dee Simon, executive director of The Holocaust Center for Humanity, Seattle's first Holocaust museum, about why she works to share the story of the genocide.

Kim Malcom sits down with Angelina Godoy, director of the University of Washington's Center for Human Rights, and UW law student Mina Manuchehri, a lead researcher at the Center. They discuss why the UW is suing the CIA over documents Manuchehri requested under the Freedom of Information Act about an alleged massacre in El Salvador. 

Amazon To Uber Drivers: Work Here Instead!

Sep 30, 2015

Kim Malcom talks to Wall Street Journal reporter Greg Bensinger about Amazon Flex, the e-commerce giant's new on-demand delivery system, and what it means for rideshare companies like Uber.

Kim Malcom sits down with former Washington state GOP chairman Chris Vance to talk about why he's running for U.S. Senate against incumbent Democrat Patty Murray.

Part of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington.
Flickr photo/ Philo Nordlund

Kim Malcolm speaks with Anna King of Northwest News Network about the most recent lawsuit involving the Hanford nuclear site in eastern Washington.

Methow Valley News staffer Darla Hussey took this photograph from a location a half-mile south of Twisp.
Methow Valley News photo/Darla Hussey

When residents of the Methow Valley want updates on the fires in their area, many of them have turned to the Facebook page of the local paper, the Methow Valley News.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Parks and Recreation superintendent Jesús Aguirre about how the city is cutting back on water use to help head off a water shortage.

Kim Malcolm speaks with Vickie Ybarra, a former elected official on the Yakima school board, about how Latinos in Yakima are making their voices heard and what representation in the City Council means for the community. 

Kim Malcolm speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about Canada's upcoming federal elections.

Flickr Photo/Japanexperterna.se (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The young woman was hiding in her closet upstairs.

She had called 911 because someone had broken into her home. She spoke very quietly.

Interstate 90 cuts through the heart of the Mountains to Sound greenway.
Courtesy of Greenway Trust

Kim Malcom talks with Mountains to Sound Greenway executive director Jon Hoekstra about the Greenway Trust and protecting the environment amid booming growth. 

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