Kim Malcolm | KUOW News and Information

Kim Malcolm

Host

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Kim began alternately hosting KUOW’s morning and afternoon news magazines in early 2015. She started at KUOW as a fill-in newscaster, after working at KERA in Dallas as a local All Things Considered host, reporter and talk show host.

Kim started in public radio at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as an associate producer and worked in Calgary and Edmonton Alberta. A transplanted Canadian, she is a graduate of the University of Calgary and Concordia University in Montreal, with a graduate diploma in journalism.

Caleb Banta-Green is a UW professor and a member of the King County heroin and prescription opiate task force.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington professor Caleb Banta-Green about a report on 2015 drug trends in King County. It finds heroin overdoses have declined from 2014. Banta-Green is a senior research scientist at the UW's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about why Silicon Valley is wading into presidential politics with an open letter to Donald Trump.

Dr. Daudi Abe, professor and historian, at the 'Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop' exhibit at MOHAI, Sept. 2015.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Washington state has one of the toughest laws for convicting police officers who kill civilians, but that wasn't always the case.

Seattle-based historian Dr. Daudi Abe shared the story of Berry Lawson, a 27-year-old African-American waiter who lived at the Mount Fuji Hotel, downtown, in 1938.


Ashley Hempelmann says a safe space to use drugs could've helped her.
KUOW Photo/Kim Malcolm

Kim Malcolm talks with Patricia Sully, coordinator for VOCAL-WA, about why she's advocating for supervised consumption sites for drug users in King County. She says that drug consumption is already happening in your backyard and that these sites aren't meant to encourage drug use, but support people along a continuum of care. 

Kim Malcolm talks with Kathy Nyland, director of Seattle's Department of Neighborhoods, about why Seattle is changing it's approach for community engagement. Last week, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced an executive order to formally cut ties with the district council system, which the city has been using for 30 years.

Pastor Drew Yoos is tired of white Christian congregations perpetuating systemic racism.
Flickr Photo/Mars Hill Church (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Drew Yoos is tired of hearing this:

“We’re all a gift from god.”
“Skin color doesn’t matter.”
“Diversity is a gift.”

He’s a pastor in the Bothell-Mill Creek area who believes that many white Christian churches are complicit in perpetuating racism.


A new Seattle-based app helps part-time workers swap shifts.
Brie Ripley

Kim Malcolm speaks with Bloomberg News Tech Reporter Dina Bass about a new Seattle-based app, Shyft. The app is designed to help part-time shift workers trade schedules with other workers. 


Kim Malcolm talks with Lisa Daugaard about civilian oversight of the Seattle Police Department. Daugaard is co-chair of Seattle's Community Police Commission, and director of the Public Defender Association.

Children splash in a fountain in Freeway Park in downtown Seattle.
Freeway Park Association/Riisa Conklin

Don't be afraid of Freeway Park in downtown Seattle: That's the message from Riisa Conklin, executive director of the Freeway Park Association. She told Kim Malcolm why the park covering I-5 is a safer, brighter place on its 40th birthday.


Dr. Michael Katze of the University of Washington microbiology department.
University of Washington

Kim Malcolm talks with Buzzfeed News reporter Azeen Ghorayshi about the sexual harassment allegations against University of Washington microbiology professor Dr. Michael Katze.


Alex Williams, an operator for 211, King County's information line for emergency food or shelter.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Kim Malcolm talks with Mark Ellerbrook about King County's new approach to connecting homeless people with shelters and housing. Ellerbrook is regional housing and community development manager for King County.

Kim Malcolm talks with Ian Toner about why he voted for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union. Toner, a British citizen and permanent resident of the U.S., is managing director of Strategic Research at Verus Investments, a Seattle-based investment management firm. 

Sound Transit bus.
Flickr Photo/wings777 (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/63X142

Kim Malcolm talks with growth and development reporter Joshua McNichols about Sound Transit's final proposal for ST3. The $50 billion transportation package will be decided on by voters this fall.

Suzan DelBene talking to supporters at the Woodmark Hotel in Kirkland.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Kim Malcolm speaks with Rep. Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.) about why she took part in a sit-in on the House floor with other Democrats to demand a vote on a measure that would restrict the purchase of a firearm by a person on the terrorist watch list. All of Washington's Democratic Congress members were part of the protest.

Kim Malcolm talks with Dr. Leah Concannon about how concussions affect kids differently than adults and why so many concussions in kids go undiagnosed and unreported to health care providers. Concannon is a sports and spine physician at UW Medicine.

An image from the Hubble space telescope.
Flickr Photo/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/EhQBf2

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Alan Boyle about how the Seattle area became a major hub for the entrepreneurial space industry. This week, Seattle is hosting NewSpace 2016, the industry's largest annual conference.

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Kim Malcolm talks with Laurie Ward about why Mount Rainier National Park is participating in an online contest to win grant money. Ward is executive director of Washington's National Park Fund. The park is hoping to restore a cabin that would provide housing for search and rescue volunteers.

Cary Chin works at the front desk of Seattle-based Gravity Payments. CEO Dan Price told his employees that he was cutting his own salary and using company profits so they would each earn a base salary of $70,000.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Kim Malcolm talks with Puget Sound Business Journal editor-in-chief Emily Parkhurst about Dan Price, CEO of Ballard-based Gravity Payments. In 2015, Price announced he would raise the minimum salaries of all of his employees to $70,000. Price is now being sued by his brother Lucas Price, a minority shareholder in the company.

File photo: salmon.
Flickr Photo/Rob Bixby (CC-BYC-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Stillaguamish Chairman Shawn Yanity about the agreement between tribal and state officials on this year's catch limits for Puget Sound salmon. Yanity is also vice chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

Screenshot from the trailer for 'Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell.'
YouTube

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle filmmaker Megan Griffiths about her picks for the Seattle International Film Festival. Griffiths recommends "Captain Fantastic" and "Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell."

Griffiths directed "The Night Stalker, which is also playing at SIFF.

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why Microsoft is scaling back its smartphone business and laying off 1,850 employees.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times reporter Lewis Kamb about SeaTac's former interim City Manager James Payne. An independent report found that Payne wanted a tactical map of where Muslims lived in SeaTac  out of concerns about terrorism. Payne resigned in April, just before the investigation was released.

Some residents of the Jungle keep tidy encampments, like William Kowang above, while others live in garbage with needles strewn about.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It's the beginning of the end for the sprawling homeless camp under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle. 

This week, officials from the city of Seattle and Washington state unveiled a plan to clear out and clean up the Jungle.

Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Kim Malcolm speaks with Xochitl Maykovich, an organizer with the Washington Community Action Network, about a Seattle City Council proposal that would make it illegal for landlords to raise rents in buildings that don't meet basic maintenance standards.  

Malcolm also speaks with Roger Valdez, executive director of Smart Growth Seattle.

Kenneth Bae spent two years in a North Korean prison
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

After a year in the North Korean prison, Kenneth Bae softened toward his guards.


Kim Malcolm speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about Fentanyl, an opiate claiming lives in British Columbia. Overdoses from this drug are on the rise and health officials are trying to educate the public. 

Many cats and dogs live as pets to residents of the Jungle, Seattle's notorious homeless encampment.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Kim Malcolm speaks with Tim Harris, local advocate for the homeless and founder of the street paper Real Change, about the plan to clear out and clean up the Jungle. Harris says this plan will not help the residents of the Jungle, it will displace them. 

Should we commercialize our state parks?

May 18, 2016
Lake Sammamish State Park
Flickr Photo/Jeff Sandquist (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5dJnYj

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times reporter Lynn Thompson about the trend of state parks seeking investment and partnerships with private companies. Thompson recently wrote an article about a proposed partnership between Rent-based outdoor retailer REI and Lake Sammamish State Park in Issaquah. 

The University of Washington and KUOW officials worked to keep the acquisition of public radio station KPLU secret, according to a Seattle Times report.

The story says the deal was intentionally described in vague language on an agenda for a UW Board of Regents meeting. The Times story revealed that UW and Pacific Lutheran University officials tried to keep details under wraps for months until they were ready to announce it publicly.

Is your brick building at serious risk in an earthquake?
Flickr Photo/Helen Cook (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/poMYZ

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton about why Seattle still has over a thousand unreinforced masonry buildings (full list here), despite knowledge of their danger in an earthquake and the availability of technology to make them safer.

Doughton is co-author with Daniel Gilbert of the article, "Buildings that kill: The earthquake danger lawmakers have ignored for decades."  

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