Kim Malcolm | KUOW News and Information

Kim Malcolm

Host

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Kim began alternately hosting KUOW’s morning and afternoon news magazines in early 2015. She started at KUOW as a fill-in newscaster, after working at KERA in Dallas as a local All Things Considered host, reporter and talk show host.

Kim started in public radio at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as an associate producer and worked in Calgary and Edmonton Alberta. A transplanted Canadian, she is a graduate of the University of Calgary and Concordia University in Montreal, with a graduate diploma in journalism.

ballot drop box ballot box
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Kim Malcolm talks with Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman about the safeguards in place to prevent cyber attacks on Washington's election systems. In 2016, Russian hackers targeted Washington's voter registration system, but were unsuccessful.

This interview was inspired by a listener question. If you want to know something about the news in this region, just ask us.

Students walk in front of Gerberding Hall on Thursday, November 16, 2017, on the University of Washington campus in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington associate professor Jennifer Stuber about suicide prevention on college campuses. Last week, the Washington state Senate passed a bill that would fund suicide prevention programs at colleges across the state.

Stuber is faculty director for Forefront Suicide Prevention at the UW.

Jimi Hendrix in Seattle, February 12, 1968
Ulvis Alberts / Museum of Pop Culture permanent collection

Poor, neglected, carrying around a broom as substitute for the guitar he didn't have.  These are images of Jimi Hendrix growing up in Seattle.

And Hendrix biographer Charles R. Cross says that even when Hendrix returned to the city as a superstar to play a concert 50 years ago, on Feb. 12, 1968, he was heckled by students at his old high school. Cross says Hendrix always had a complicated relationship with Seattle, but the city should use this anniversary to do more to honor him.


Flickr Photo/Brian Stalter (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Alison Holcomb about Seattle's move to vacate convictions for misdemeanor marijuana possession. Holcomb is director of strategy for the ACLU of Washington and the architect of Initiative 502, which legalized recreational marijuana in Washington.

Flickr Photo/Emory Maiden (CC-BY-NC-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/avtfVU

Kim Malcolm talks with Northshore School District Superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid about her district's new approach to assessing students for giftedness. In January, the district implemented a universal screening process for its Highly Capable program.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington law professors Lisa Manheim and Kathryn Watts about their new book, "The Limits of Presidential Power: A Citizen's Guide to the Law."

Flickr Photo/torbakhopper (CC-BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nHEVtP

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington researcher Caleb Banta-Green about why methamphetamine use is on the rise in Washington state.

Seattle Mariners former designated hitter Edgar Martinez speaks at a news conference announcing the retirement by the team of his jersey number 11, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times columnist Larry Stone about whether Edgar Martinez is likely to be voted into Major League Baseball's Hall of Fame. Martinez played his entire 18-year career with the Seattle Mariners, retiring in 2004.

Seattle City Hall
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1OGMTuh

Kim Malcolm talks with Crosscut reporter David Kroman about his investigation into the work culture at the city of Seattle's Human Resources department.

Flickr Photo/Tony Swartz (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the outcome of public records lawsuit against the Washington Legislature.

Tita Begashaw is famous for her laugh. It even got her on the TV show 'America's Got Talent' last year.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

The news these days just doesn't seem to lighten up and sometimes we need a laugh.

That's the specialty of Tita Begashaw, a laughter coach at Harborview Medical Center.

Parade-goers carry a blow-up planet Earth while marching in the Fremont Solstice Parade.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

OK, you’re a climate warrior: You take the bus, downtown or to California. You eat vegan.

But do you have to be so insufferable about it?

Some people don’t have all of the options that you do.

Pramila Jayapal
Flickr Photo/Joe Mabel (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/zznt82

Kim Malcolm talks with Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-Seattle) about why she won't attend President Trump's State of the Union address on January 30.

Housing costs contribute dramatically to the high basic cost of living in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

Rents have been declining in the Seattle area. Compared with the previous quarter, rents in December dropped an average of $50.

Eileen Wilkinson's family surprised her with a hundred and one letters written by people from all over the world
KUOW Photos / Casey Martin /

Communicating these days is all about texts, emails, tweets, and posts. But do you remember letters? 

Sammamish resident Eileen Wilkinson does. She loves writing and receiving letters.

Yesterday was Wilkinson's birthday. She turned one hundred and one years old.

Smoke from an approaching wildfire looms over a home near Twisp, Wash., Aug. 19, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Kim Malcolm talks with Dr. Philip Mote about how climate change is changing Washington state. Mote is director of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute. Previously, he was the Washington State Climatologist.

Flickr Photo/Tony Swartz (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/a48XR

Kim Malcolm speaks with Senator Andy Billig (D - Spokane) about what Democrats hope to accomplish during the 2018 legislative session. Billig is deputy majority leader of the Washington State Senate. 

KUOW/ Gil Aegerter

The Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute in Seattle's Central District is a hub for black performing arts.

For years the programming at the institute was run by the city. But now a new nonprofit is taking over with new leadership.


Stephen Voss/NPR

Kim Malcolm talks with All Things Considered host Robert Siegel, who's retiring from the program on Friday. Siegel began his career at NPR in 1976 as a newscaster. Siegel has hosted All Things Considered since 1987.

A view of Puget Sound from the Amtrak Cascades ride. The new view will be of Interstate 5.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

Amtrak riders in Pierce County are getting a change in scenery. The roughly 30 mile train ride between Tacoma and Olympia is being rerouted.

Right now the  trip hugs the coastline along Point Defiance with views of Puget Sound. 


Flickr Photo/furtwangl (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/65WoW5

The parent company of Value Village has filed a federal lawsuit against Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson regarding whether the thrift store should be required to tell customers how much of its sales actually go to charities. Associated Press reporter Gene Johnson discussed the case with KUOW's Kim Malcolm.

Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Douglas Chin says there’s a lot at stake in the legal argument over the latest version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban.

Like Hawaii’s “aloha spirit,” said Chin, the state’s attorney general.


Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/aiu7zy

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington nursing professor Josephine Ensign about the Doorway Project, the UW's effort to address youth homelessness.

The long-term goal of the project is to open a navigation center and hub in the University District that caters to homeless young people. Ensign is coordinator of the project.

Pramila Jayapal
Flickr Photo/Joe Mabel (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/zznt82

Kim Malcolm talks with Rep. Pramila Jayapal about why she believes Sen. Al Franken should step down from Congress. On Tuesday, Jayapal also called for Rep. John Conyers to resign. Both men face multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

Adhering to Seattle's climate action plan would require reducing tailpipe exhaust 15 times faster than the 0.5 percent a year Seattle has actually achieved.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with Lisa Van Cise about the heavy traffic that drivers can expect over Thanksgiving weekend. Van Cise is a spokesperson for the Washington State Department of Transportation.

Mayoral candidates Jenny Durkan (left) and Cary Moon (right) enjoy the lightening round
KUOW Photo / Amy Radil

Former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan and urbanist Cary Moon have some really sharp differences. Take their feelings on Beecher's cheese and the Eagles, for instance.

Dr. Lois James, Assistant Professor at Washington State University
Courtesy of Washington State University/Cori Medeiros

After a white police officer killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, there were months of protest across the country, including Seattle. New attention focused on how the police interact with black people.

Now, police departments are considering whether special training can help their officers overcome their own biases.

Dr. Sapna Cheryan, Psychology Professor at the University of Washington
Courtesy of Nikki Ritcher

People who are chubby or fat often experience prejudice. 

But a recent study out of the University of Washington found that for Asian Americans, being fat correlates with being viewed as belonging in the U.S. Dr. Sapna Cheryan is a psychology professor at the UW. She talked to Kim Malcolm about the study's results.  


A family waits to speak with an immigration attorney at a free legal clinic hosted by the City of Seattle
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Kim Malcolm talks with Wired Magazine senior writer Issie Lapowsky about a new Senate proposal that would overhaul the legal immigration system in the U.S.

It would cut in half the number of immigrants admitted to the U.S. and scrap the current system, which favors family reunification.

Instead, it would introduce what the president calls a "merit-based" system. Immigrants with English proficiency, education and high-paying job offers would be given preference to acquire a green card.

Detainee at theImmigration and Customs Enforcement's Tacoma Detention Center in July, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with Franco Ordonez, White House correspondent for McClatchy, about the uncertain future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. DACA shields some immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children from deportation.

Pages