Kim Malcolm | KUOW News and Information

Kim Malcolm

Host

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Kim began alternately hosting KUOW’s morning and afternoon news magazines in early 2015. She started at KUOW as a fill-in newscaster, after working at KERA in Dallas as a local All Things Considered host, reporter and talk show host.

Kim started in public radio at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as an associate producer and worked in Calgary and Edmonton Alberta. A transplanted Canadian, she is a graduate of the University of Calgary and Concordia University in Montreal, with a graduate diploma in journalism.

A mural painted by artist Caratoes is shown on Tuesday, August 15, 2017, along the Sodo Track in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with Monica Guzman, editor of the Seattle daily newsletter The Evergrey, about some events to check out in Seattle this weekend.

Guzman recommends:

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Kim Malcolm talks with U.S. Sen. Patty Murray about her opposition to Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver at the 2007 World Summer Games in Shanghai
Courtesy of Special Olympics International

Kim Malcolm talks with author Eileen McNamara about her biography of Eunice Kennedy Shriver, titled "Eunice: The Kennedy Who Changed the World." Shriver founded the Special Olympics, which debuted in 1968. This weekend, the 2018 Special Olympics get underway at Seattle's Husky Stadium.

Pamela and Afshin Raghebi relax together. The couple has been separated since Afshin left the US to seek permanent legal status and has not been permitted to return home.
Courtesy of Pamela Raghebi

Seattle resident Pamela Raghebi is separated from her husband Afshin, who's orginally from Iran. After leaving the country in March to acquire legal status, Afshin has been unable to return to the United States.

The Supreme Court ruling upholding President Trump's travel ban means that Afshin may not be able to return home.


Beach-goers in Seattle enjoy a Puget Sound shore in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Kim Malcolm talks with Joe Casola about a new analysis that finds average temperatures in Washington have warmed more slowly than any other state in the country. Casola is deputy director of the University of Washington's Climate Impacts Group.

A two-year-old child from Honduras gets treatment for an ear infection after sleeping in the open in front of the El Chaparral port of entry, in Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, April 30, 2018.
AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik

Kim Malcolm talks with Beth Farmer about the experiences of asylum seekers who are coming to the United States from Central America. Farmer is director of Refugees Northwest.

Josephine Ensign, director of the University of Washington's Doorway Project for homeless youth
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

There's a lot of money in Seattle these days. Companies like Amazon and Starbucks are based here, and construction has been booming. But our city has one of the biggest homelessness problems in the country.

Our listeners are wondering about that disconnect. And they've been asking us questions about the issue.


Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., speaks with the media after testifying before the Senate Law and Justice Committee about Green River serial killer Gary Ridgway on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, in Olympia, Wash.
AP Photo/Rachel La Corte

Kim Malcolm talks with U.S. Rep Dave Reichert about why he's opposed to President Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum. The tariffs affect imports from the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

The federal prison at SeaTac where 177 women seeking asylum have been jailed. About half of those women were taken from their children at the border. The children were between 3 and 16 years.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

Kim Malcolm talks with immigration attorney Jorge Baron about the experiences of asylum seekers who are being jailed at the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac. Baron is executive director of the Northwest Immigrants Rights Project.

Washington State Trooper Rick Johnson
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

State Trooper Rick Johnson has heard some curious excuses from people driving in the HOV lane.

"I forgot I didn’t have my kids in the car.”

“I consider my dog/golden retriever a person.”

Others are more brazen: “We’ve confiscated a number of mannequins,” he said.


Apples at the Olympia Farmers Market.
Flickr Photo/WSDA (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ZsGd1C

U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum went into effect Friday for Canada, the European Union and Mexico. That decision by the Trump Administration could now hurt one of Washington state's signature exports: apples. 


The lobby of CIA headquarters in Langley, VA
Flickr Photo/Global Panorama (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nwpVJ9

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington professor Angelina Godoy about the settlement of a lawsuit against the CIA. The UW's Center for Human Rights has been seeking information about U.S. involvement in the civil war in El Salvador during the 1980's.

Safeco Field in Seattle
Flickr Photo/hj_west (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/UWDcZw

Kim Malcolm talks with King County councilmember Dave Upthegrove about a proposal that would allocate up to $190 million in taxes over two decades for improvement and maintenance at Safeco Field. The money would come from King County's hotel/motel tax.

Charlene Lieu
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

In the world of climbing, a climber without a partner is like a jockey without a horse.

Which is why, for women climbers, talking about sexual harassment can be dicey.


Jenny Durkan at her election night party on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2017
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with news analyst Joni Balter about why the head tax proposed by the Seattle City Council puts Mayor Jenny Durkan in a politically tricky position. Balter is a contributor to Bloomberg Opinion and host of Civic Cocktail on the Seattle Channel.

Courtesy of Kellie Sevier

Last month, 27-year-old Sabrina Tate died in Seattle. She was living in an RV in a city-sanctioned safe lot in the SODO neighborhood.

For years, Sabrina had been homeless and addicted to heroin. The cause of her death isn't fully known yet, but she had developed an infection in her legs from years of drug use. 

Deborah Alexander, one of the many people who were tribally disenrolled from the Nooksack tribe, looks out of the window of a safety boat during the first leg of a canoe journey on Thursday, July 27, 2017, in Point Roberts.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The Nooksack Tribe in northwestern Washington is on the path to having a legal government again after it held a council election over the weekend.

That election was supposed to happen two years ago, when half of its seats expired.


Larches, a staple of the North Cascades, are shown on the Pacifc Crest Trail near Cutthroat Pass.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The North Cascades National Park turns 50 years old this year.

It's a popular place to camp and hike now, but a new book about the park's history says it got off to a rocky start. 


FILE: T-Mobile storefront
Flickr Photo/Mike Mozart (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/oAiRsx

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the potential impact of the proposed merger between Bellevue-based T-Mobile and Sprint.

Bike share bikes in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with Dr. Frederick Rivara about whether the increasing popularity of bike sharing has led to more head injuries. Dr. Rivara is professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington.

This interview was inspired by a question from KUOW listener Patricia Boiko.

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Your list of errands for the weekend might include picking up a prescription — but just imagine if that meant going for a walk in the woods.

For some, that's exactly what the doctor ordered.

Sunday is National Park Prescriptions Day, which encourages health care providers to prescribe time in nature to reduce stress and improve patient health. 


Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Kim Malcolm talks with U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) about a bill she's co-sponsoring that aims to combat the opioid epidemic in the United States.

Murray said the bill would increase access to mental health services and to treatment programs in underserved areas.

She also said the bill would encourage the development of non-addictive painkillers and step up efforts to detect and seize drugs like fentanyl.

A government sign at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation
Flickr Photo/Tobin (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ez3FA

Kim Malcolm talks with Northwest News Network Richland correspondent Anna King about a report from the Government Accountability Office that raises serious safety concerns at Hanford's waste treatment plant.

A Seattle Saracens rugby match
Flickr Photo/Francisco Javier Perez (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/RrAo1f

Kim Malcolm talks with Kevin Flynn about the Seattle Seawolves and the prospects for professional rugby in Seattle. Flynn is a manager with the Seawolves and president of the Seattle Saracens Rugby Club.

The Seawolves kick off their inaugural season against the San Diego Legion on Sunday at Starfire Sports in Tukwila.

A fish-friendly culvert in Washington state.
Flickr Photo/Washington DNR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/cCuMVy

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington law professor Robert Anderson about a U.S. Supreme Court case involving Native American fishing rights in Washington state. At issue is whether Washington state should pay to fix culverts, which block the passage of salmon.

Bellevue and Seattle in the distance from Jeremy Noble's Cessna 182 airplane during his evening commute on Wednesday, August 23, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with Steve Marshall about Bellevue's plan to implement electric, self-driving van pools and shuttles. Marshall is transportation technology partnership manager for the city of Bellevue.

Dennis Wise / University of Washington

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington associate psychology professor Kristina Olson about her research into transgender kids. On Thursday, Olson was honored with the National Science Foundation's Alan T. Waterman award, which includes a $1 million research grant.

Olson says the funding will be used to expand the TransYouth Project, and to establish a mentorship program for LGBTQ students, and others who are underrepresented in the field of science.

An Uber driver near the San Francisco International Airport.
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

The Seattle City Council unanimously passed a resolution Monday to consider regulating transportation network companies like Uber and Lyft.

The city could end up raising base fares to $2.40, which is the minimum fare charged by taxis. Currently, both Lyft and Uber charge $1.35 as a base fare in Seattle.

Kim Malcolm talks with journalist Kevin Schofield about the impact of potential regulations on drivers and consumers.

A wild Pacific salmon, left, next to an escaped farm-raised Atlantic salmon, right, on Aug. 22 at Home Port Seafoods in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes about a new study that looks at the impact of drugs picked up by juvenile Chinook salmon in Puget Sound.

Recology employee Zakarya Sales works at the final quality control station, removing any visibly obvious contaminants from sorted bales, at the Recology Materials Recovery Facility on Tuesday, October 31, 2017, on S. Idaho St., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Have you wondered where your recycling goes once it's picked up? A KUOW listener was curious about that, so we asked Hans Van Dusen, the solid waste contracts manager at Seattle Public Utilities.

He tells Kim Malcolm about the journey our cans and paper takes. 


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