Katherine Banwell | KUOW News and Information

Katherine Banwell

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2014

Katherine started working at KUOW in February 2014 as the audio engineer for the afternoon news magazine. Currently she's the producer for the Race and Equity team.

Prior to coming to KUOW, she worked at KPLU ("the other public radio station in the city") as a fill-in host on All Things Considered and host of Weekend Morning Edition. She's also the voice of many telephone on-hold messages for businesses across the country.

Originally from Canada, she began her broadcasting career as a news and arts reporter for, among other places, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). 

Fifth grader Nina Perry at KUOW Public Radio in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Eleven-year-old Nina Parry noticed a man sitting outside her neighborhood QFC. She and her mom brought him food. But there were others.

“Ever since I can remember, I've been seeing homeless people asking for money or just sitting in the streets being cold,” she said.


Recology employee Zakarya Sales works at the final quality control station, removing any visibly obvious contaminants from sorted bales, at the Recology Materials Recovery Facility on Tuesday, October 31, 2017, on S. Idaho St., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Have you wondered where your recycling goes once it's picked up? A KUOW listener was curious about that, so we asked Hans Van Dusen, the solid waste contracts manager at Seattle Public Utilities.

He tells Kim Malcolm about the journey our cans and paper takes. 


A Red-tailed hawk
Flickr photo/Tom Murray (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/245dfsx

Gaby Spadafora of Edmonds was curious about something recently:

“What species of bird sits on the light posts above our highways? And why does this one type of bird hang out up there?”

Art in the halls at Marysville-Pilchuck High School following the mass shooting in October 2014.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Last month a teen stormed into his former high school in Florida and killed 17 people. Teenagers from the school are demanding that the federal government ban assault-style guns like the one used there. 

The incident prompted a question to KUOW about counseling for school-age children. So we talked to David Bilides. He's the head counselor at Jane Addams Middle School in Seattle.

Bilides is worried about how students there are handling this latest news.

Jimi Hendrix in Seattle, February 12, 1968
Ulvis Alberts / Museum of Pop Culture permanent collection

Poor, neglected, carrying around a broom as substitute for the guitar he didn't have.  These are images of Jimi Hendrix growing up in Seattle.

And Hendrix biographer Charles R. Cross says that even when Hendrix returned to the city as a superstar to play a concert 50 years ago, on Feb. 12, 1968, he was heckled by students at his old high school. Cross says Hendrix always had a complicated relationship with Seattle, but the city should use this anniversary to do more to honor him.


Elle Christensen watches the crowd for Seattle's women's march past her perch at Seventh and Jackson on Jan. 21.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Thousands of people – maybe tens of thousands, according to the city of Seattle — are expected at the second Women’s March in Seattle this Saturday.


Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Douglas Chin says there’s a lot at stake in the legal argument over the latest version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban.

Like Hawaii’s “aloha spirit,” said Chin, the state’s attorney general.


Damon Bomar, owner/operator of That Brown Girl Cooks!
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

We don't need statistics to see that Seattle is growing at an unprecedented rate. One neighborhood where the change is most noticeable is the Central District.


Dr. Lois James, Assistant Professor at Washington State University
Courtesy of Washington State University/Cori Medeiros

After a white police officer killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, there were months of protest across the country, including Seattle. New attention focused on how the police interact with black people.

Now, police departments are considering whether special training can help their officers overcome their own biases.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

Many white Americans believe that black Americans earn close to what their own families make. The truth is far different.

Blacks, on average, earn half of what whites do in this country.

Dr. Sapna Cheryan, Psychology Professor at the University of Washington
Courtesy of Nikki Ritcher

People who are chubby or fat often experience prejudice. 

But a recent study out of the University of Washington found that for Asian Americans, being fat correlates with being viewed as belonging in the U.S. Dr. Sapna Cheryan is a psychology professor at the UW. She talked to Kim Malcolm about the study's results.  


Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Washington state and federal officials want to make it easier for you to access the state's many parks and recreation areas.

Right now, there are about 20 different kinds of passes, leading to a lot of confusion for park goers. 

Marty Jackson
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Marty Jackson runs the Southeast Area Network of the Seattle Youth Violence Prevention Initiative. For years, she had worked with Stephan Stewart, trying to keep him off the streets.

And her efforts appeared to be working.


Kendra Roberson, lecturer at the University of Washington School of Social Work.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

When 30-year-old Charleena Lyles was shot and killed by Seattle Police, her death became part of a legacy of trauma absorbed by the black community. Brain scientists are only now researching impacts this kind of violence has on the psyche of African-Americans and their involvement in the criminal justice system.  

Kendra Roberson, a lecturer at the University of Washington School of Social Work, provides therapy services for black school-age girls. She told reporter Patricia Murphy that young people experiencing long-term trauma can begin to believe that bad things will happen to them.

Stephan Blanford, former Seattle School Board member
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

When Stephan Blanford ran for Seattle school board four years ago, he won 89 percent of the vote.

But he often felt stuck as a member of that board and now says he won’t run again.


Brettler Family Place, part of the complex at Sand Point Housing.
Solid Ground

Charleena Lyles lived in housing owned and operated by Solid Ground in Seattle's Magnuson Park. The nonprofit organization manages a campus with 175 housing units for people who have come through the experience of being homeless. Mike Buchman is the communications director at Solid Ground. He told Kim Malcolm that a neighborhood has been created at Sand Point for hundreds of people. 

Jenny Henderson, Seattle mental health counselor
KUOW: Kara McDermott

The African American community in Seattle is in shock after city police shot and killed 30-year-old Charleena Lyles. Jenny Henderson is a therapist in Seattle whose clientele is mostly black. She tells Kim Malcolm that Lyles' mental illness was not taken into account. 

Filiberto Barajas-Lopez, Education professor at the University of Washington
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Chief Sealth International High School in West Seattle is among the most diverse schools in the city. Seventy-five percent of the students are black, Latino, Asian or Native. But a lot of its students of color felt that the teachers tended to pay more attention to the white kids.


La TaSha Levy, assistant professor of American ethnic studies at the University of Washington.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

La TaSha Levy is an assistant professor of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington. Patricia Murphy talks to her about the intersection between Black Lives Matter and the Black Panther Party and how the two movements have more in common that we may realize. 


Dr. Ralina Joseph and Sade Britt
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Is it OK to call someone of color ethnic? What does half-white mean? 


Toyia Taylor, founder of Young Artists Academy, says this was a dream of hers
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Staff at Southern Heights Elementary School were concerned about an 11-year-old boy. He wouldn't make eye contact with people and was disengaged from those around him.

Then the Young Artists Academy came to the Highline school. The class helps kids in 4th through 10th grades find their voices.


Zakary Fike and William Hughes
KUOW: Isolde Raftery

"I had NEVER hugged a white man in my whole life. And now I'm like hugging these guys and saying 'I love you, brother.'"  

Mary Jean Ryan, executive director of the Road Map Project
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

If you're a kid of color living in poverty in our region, getting to college can be tough. The Road Map Project has been trying to help for seven years. Its goal was, by 2020, to double the rate at which students in South Seattle and South King County finish college.

But with growth changing the region so quickly, people at the project reassessed that time frame. The new goal: Raise the college graduation rate to 70 percent by the year 2030.

An EnergyGuide sticker on a television includes the EnergyStar seal, meaning it's an efficient set.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

The Trump administration wants to end the EnergyStar program – you might know it from labels that mark the most energy-efficient appliances when you shop for a TV, refrigerator or computer.

Nives Dolsak and Aseem Prakash of the University of Washington told KUOW’s Emily Fox that ending the program doesn’t make sense, for a number of reasons.


surgery
Flickr Photo/Army Medicine

Information was released this week about how the Republican health plan would affect people in Washington. UW associate law professor Sallie Sanford spoke with Kim Malcolm about who loses the most.

Seattle Times FYI Guy Gene Balk
Ken Lambert

Seattle sees itself as a progressive city. Then there are those taxes ...

A nationwide study of 51 cities says Seattle is the fourth worst for taxes if you’re poor. But if you’re rich, it’s the fourth best.

Gene Balk, the data-reporting FYI Guy of the Seattle Times, wrote about the study and told KUOW's Kim Malcolm about the disparity for the poor (defined as a family of three earning $25,000).


James Gregory, history professor at the University of Washington.
KUOW/Kara McDermott

Recent hate crimes prompted President Donald Trump to condemn such acts in a speech to Congress. Some of those incidents have been in the Pacific Northwest, and now the shooting of a Sikh man in Kent is being investigated as a possible federal civil rights violation. 

UW history professor James Gregory told KUOW's Kim Malcolm about the prevalence of hate crimes in the Pacific Northwest. 


UW assistant professor of education Holly Schindler
University of Washington

Kim Malcolm talks with Holly Schindler, University of Washington assistant professor of education, about her study of low income dads of color. She wants to help them understand how they can more actively support their young children.

Chris Porter
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

During his "State of the City" address, Seattle mayor Ed Murray announced a new initiative called Our Best. It focuses on improving the lives of young black men in the city.

Chris Porter is part of the African American Male Advisory Committee for Seattle Public Schools. Kim Malcolm talks to him about his thoughts on the announcement.

Assistant Chief Perry Tarrant of the Seattle Police Department.
City of Seattle

Perry Tarrant wants young African Americans to know their rights in interactions with police.

But Tarrant, assistant chief at the Seattle Police Department, told KUOW’s Emily Fox that just as important is knowing what to do if you think you’ve been wronged by the police.


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