Katherine Banwell | KUOW News and Information

Katherine Banwell

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2014

Katherine started working at KUOW in February 2014 as the audio engineer for the afternoon news magazine. Currently she's the producer for the Race and Equity team.

Prior to coming to KUOW, she worked at KPLU ("the other public radio station in the city") as a fill-in host on All Things Considered and host of Weekend Morning Edition. She's also the voice of many telephone on-hold messages for businesses across the country.

Originally from Canada, she began her broadcasting career as a news and arts reporter for, among other places, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). 

Kendra Roberson, lecturer at the University of Washington School of Social Work.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

When 30-year-old Charleena Lyles was shot and killed by Seattle Police, her death became part of a legacy of trauma absorbed by the black community. Brain scientists are only now researching impacts this kind of violence has on the psyche of African-Americans and their involvement in the criminal justice system.  

Kendra Roberson, a lecturer at the University of Washington School of Social Work, provides therapy services for black school-age girls. She told reporter Patricia Murphy that young people experiencing long-term trauma can begin to believe that bad things will happen to them.

Stephan Blanford, Seattle School Board member
KUOW: Megan Farmer

When Stephan Blanford ran for Seattle school board four years ago, he won 89 percent of the vote.

But he often felt stuck as a member of that board and now says he won’t run again.


Brettler Family Place, part of the complex at Sand Point Housing
Solid Ground

Charleena Lyles lived in housing owned and operated by Solid Ground in Seattle's Magnuson Park. The nonprofit organization manages a campus with 175 housing units for people who have come through the experience of being homeless. Mike Buchman is the communications director at Solid Ground. He told Kim Malcolm that a neighborhood has been created at Sand Point for hundreds of people. 

Jenny Henderson, Seattle mental health counselor
KUOW: Kara McDermott

The African American community in Seattle is in shock after city police shot and killed 30-year-old Charleena Lyles. Jenny Henderson is a therapist in Seattle whose clientele is mostly black. She tells Kim Malcolm that Lyles' mental illness was not taken into account. 

Filiberto Barajas-Lopez, Education professor at the University of Washington
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Chief Sealth International High School in West Seattle is among the most diverse schools in the city. Seventy-five percent of the students are black, Latino, Asian or Native. But a lot of its students of color felt that the teachers tended to pay more attention to the white kids.


La TaSha Levy, assistant professor of American ethnic studies at the University of Washington.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

La TaSha Levy is an assistant professor of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington. Patricia Murphy talks to her about the intersection between Black Lives Matter and the Black Panther Party and how the two movements have more in common that we may realize. 


Dr. Ralina Joseph and Sade Britt
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Is it OK to call someone of color ethnic? What does half-white mean? 


Zakary Fike and William Hughes
KUOW: Isolde Raftery

"I had NEVER hugged a white man in my whole life. And now I'm like hugging these guys and saying 'I love you, brother.'"  

Mary Jean Ryan, executive director of the Road Map Project
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

If you're a kid of color living in poverty in our region, getting to college can be tough. The Road Map Project has been trying to help for seven years. Its goal was, by 2020, to double the rate at which students in South Seattle and South King County finish college.

But with growth changing the region so quickly, people at the project reassessed that time frame. The new goal: Raise the college graduation rate to 70 percent by the year 2030.

An EnergyGuide sticker on a television includes the EnergyStar seal, meaning it's an efficient set.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

The Trump administration wants to end the EnergyStar program – you might know it from labels that mark the most energy-efficient appliances when you shop for a TV, refrigerator or computer.

Nives Dolsak and Aseem Prakash of the University of Washington told KUOW’s Emily Fox that ending the program doesn’t make sense, for a number of reasons.


surgery
Flickr Photo/Army Medicine

Information was released this week about how the Republican health plan would affect people in Washington. UW associate law professor Sallie Sanford spoke with Kim Malcolm about who loses the most.

Seattle Times FYI Guy Gene Balk
Ken Lambert

Seattle sees itself as a progressive city. Then there are those taxes ...

A nationwide study of 51 cities says Seattle is the fourth worst for taxes if you’re poor. But if you’re rich, it’s the fourth best.

Gene Balk, the data-reporting FYI Guy of the Seattle Times, wrote about the study and told KUOW's Kim Malcolm about the disparity for the poor (defined as a family of three earning $25,000).


James Gregory, history professor at the University of Washington.
KUOW/Kara McDermott

Recent hate crimes prompted President Donald Trump to condemn such acts in a speech to Congress. Some of those incidents have been in the Pacific Northwest, and now the shooting of a Sikh man in Kent is being investigated as a possible federal civil rights violation. 

UW history professor James Gregory told KUOW's Kim Malcolm about the prevalence of hate crimes in the Pacific Northwest. 


UW assistant professor of education Holly Schindler
University of Washington

Kim Malcolm talks with Holly Schindler, University of Washington assistant professor of education, about her study of low income dads of color. She wants to help them understand how they can more actively support their young children.

Chris Porter
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

During his "State of the City" address, Seattle mayor Ed Murray announced a new initiative called Our Best. It focuses on improving the lives of young black men in the city.

Chris Porter is part of the African American Male Advisory Committee for Seattle Public Schools. Kim Malcolm talks to him about his thoughts on the announcement.

Assistant Chief Perry Tarrant of the Seattle Police Department.
City of Seattle

Perry Tarrant wants young African Americans to know their rights in interactions with police.

But Tarrant, assistant chief at the Seattle Police Department, told KUOW’s Emily Fox that just as important is knowing what to do if you think you’ve been wronged by the police.


Seattle & King County Public Health Officer Dr. Jeff Duchin
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Emily Fox speaks with Dr. Jeff Duchin, public health officer for Public Health-Seattle and King County, about how ending the Affordable Care Act will impact people of color.

Carl Livingston, a professor at Seattle Central College and a pastor at Kingdom Christian Center in Federal Way.
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Carl Livingston sees the troubles facing African American churches in Seattle as a test.

Livingston told KUOW’s Kim Malcolm that as the city has grown more expensive, congregations are surviving in part by cutting costs and seeking innovative ways to find income.


Seattle Times writer Tyrone Beason has an essay about race in the Pacific Northwest Magazine.
KUOW photo/Katherine Banwell

When Tyrone Beason called his father after Donald Trump was elected, the conversation didn’t start in the turmoil of the present.

“He started to talk about segregation, those ugly times in his formative years that shaped his understanding not only of what it was to be black but what it was to be white,” Beason told KUOW’s Jamala Henderson. 


Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Twitter

If you’re a person of color in this country, every day you might encounter oppression that remains from systems set in motion hundreds of years ago.

The inequity that results affects everything from jobs to education to housing to health care. Given our history, what would it take to really bring racial equity?


Quinton Morris, violin professor.
Courtesy of Quinton Morris

Quinton Morris is a violin virtuoso who wants to give back. The Seattle University teacher grew up in Renton and fondly remembers the support he got from the community. He says that encouragement is important for people of color who want to be classical musicians. Morris told Jamala Henderson how he was often discouraged.  

Dr. Pedro Noguera, educator and sociologist
gseis.ucla.edu

Dr. Pedro Noguera is a UCLA sociologist and an expert in urban education. He was in Seattle Tuesday night to speak about the ways educators and administrators can improve student achievement and get them more engaged in school. He told Patricia Murphy many Seattle-area suburban schools are struggling with that balance, but many are doing it right. 

Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state lawmkers are back at the state Capitol for this year’s legislative session with one of the biggest spending questions looming over their heads in recent years.

That's how to comply with a 2012 court order to fully pay for K-12 education. KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins told Kim Malcolm that lawmakers are facing tough deadlines.


Educator Jasen Frelot
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Many white parents have difficulty finding the right words to use when talking to their kids about racism. Preschool director Jasen Frelot runs workshops for white parents. He starts by telling those parents to sit with their discomfort.

Professor Ralina Joseph at the University of Washington says to just start talking about race.
University of Washington

Why is race so hard to discuss? Ralina Joseph, founding director of the University of Washington’s Center for Communication, Difference, and Equity, talked about coded racial language, from Seattle liberals to Trump. This is a transcript from her interview, lightly edited for clarity.


KUOW general manager Caryn Mathes
KUOW Photo

Journalism is so white.

That’s a criticism of newsrooms in America, and the numbers show that it’s true: In radio, just 9.4 percent of journalists are people of color.

Rita Zawaideh of Salaam Cultural Museum
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Bill Radke talks with Rita Zawaideh, who runs the humanitarian nonprofit Salaam Cultural Museum in Seattle, about the current struggles of Syrian people in Aleppo. 

U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington state's 2nd District.
U.S. government

U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen speaks with KUOW's Kim Malcolm about Donald Trump's choice of Breitbart chief Steve Bannon as a key strategist in the White House.


Judge Judith Hightower, far left, is retiring after 25 years at Seattle Municipal Court.
Seattle.gov

The woman had been booked into King County Jail for driving with a suspended license.

When she appeared between Judge Judith Hightower, she asked her to be released because she had to get home in time for her 10-year-old boy.


Gabriella Garrett, Colleen Andersonn Marci Oliveri went for a ride on the earthquake simulator Tuesday afternoon.
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

The city of Seattle invited the public to a "Big Shaker" event Tuesday at Westlake Park to be part of an earthquake simulation and nudge people to prepare for the inevitable.

KUOW's Katherine Banwell went along for the ride and sent us this audio postcard featuring Dean Reese, CEO of Ready America; simulator participants Gabriella Garrett, Colleen Anderson and Marci Oliveri; and Matt Auflick of the Seattle Office of Emergency Management.

Pages