Kate Walters | KUOW News and Information

Kate Walters

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2015

Kate is a daily news reporter at KUOW. Originally from Australia, Kate studied journalism at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology before coming to work in public radio. Kate began her career as a reporter with WXXI Public Radio in Rochester, NY, where she worked as part of a Local Journalism Center (LJC) called the Innovation Trail. At KUOW, she started as a producer on The Record before joining the news desk.

Football
Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Ok5MYl

After Odell Beckham hit Carolina Panthers cornerback Josh Norman with fists and helmet in December, the NFL suspended him for a game.

But what had angered the Giants’ star wide receiver? Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, says homophobic slurs allegedly had been hurled at Beckham.

Canadian dollar, or 'loonie'
Flickr Photo/Jackman Chiu (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1ZpVqsL

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn about the plunging Canadian dollar and a new study that proves Canadians are more polite than Americans. Quinn hosts On the Coast on CBC Radio One in Vancouver. He also writes a weekly column for the Globe and Mail.  

Bill Radke speaks with Globe and Mail national correspondent Justine Hunter about a tent camp in Victoria, B.C. that's moving inside. 

City Councilmember Jean Godden at Bulldog News in the University District.
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Seattle city government changed on Monday when three new members were sworn in to the Seattle City Council. Lisa Herbold, Rob Johnson and Debora Juarez join the ranks of the new, majority female council.

As the city greets its new officials, we also say goodbye to some council members. Jean Godden has been on the Seattle City Council for more than a decade. Bill Radke speaks with her about Now returning to life outside city hall.

Ammon Bundy, center, one of the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, walks off after speaking with reporters during a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters Monday, Jan. 4, 2016, near Burns, Ore.
AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Bill Radke speaks with Oregonian reporter Les Zaits about armed protesters occupying a federal building in rural Oregon. The issue: management of public land in the rural northwest. 

David Hyde also speaks with reporter Anna King about the tension over public land management in rural Washington. King says people in rural Washington sympathize with the complaints from the self-styled militia in Oregon, but they don't agree with the tactics. 

Bill Radke talks to biotech reporter Luke Timmerman about CRISPR/Cas9, a technology that lets scientist quickly and easily edit DNA. 

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

You know a major earthquake in Seattle is possible – there was that scary New Yorker article this year with the headline: "The Really Big One."

Now you’ve got a new online tool to help you prepare.

Traffic on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1irsJLd

You drive from Seattle, over the Cascades, through Yakima, then down into eastern Oregon. And the government knows where you are all along the way.

Privacy is just one concern with a proposal for a pay-by-mile system to fund roadwork, said Mark Hallenbeck, director of the Washington State Transportation Center at the University of Washington.

Mike DiCecco carrying a Christmas tree
Courtesy of MJD Distributors Garden Center

Have you ever heard of the Chubby and Tubby variety stores? Back in the day they were a Seattle institution. They were known for cheap Converse shoes, cheap fishing supplies, cheap everything. 

It's been about 12 years since the Chubby and Tubby stores shut down, but it turns out their cheap Christmas tree tradition lives on.

Canadian dollar, or 'loonie'
Flickr Photo/Jackman Chiu (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1ZpVqsL

David Hyde speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the continued fall of the Canadian dollar. Palmer also gives an update on plans for a sewage treatment plant in Victoria, B.C.

A motel room on Aurora. There are about 50 to 60 women who work as prostitutes on Aurora. Many are addicts, and many have pimps who control their every move. Those without pimps are often homeless and struggle to pay for a night at a cheap motel.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Solving America’s prostitution problem starts with boys in middle school.

That’s how Peter Qualliotine, who runs a treatment program for johns through the Organization for Prostitution Survivors, sees it.

car keys
Flickr Photo/walknboston (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1O4LD7v

Seattleite Else Driflot kind of knew when it was time to give up her keys. Her eyesight had declined and she was having trouble seeing. It made sense to give up her keys, but that doesn't mean she liked it. 

"It was totally miserable. You know, because I lived alone, I had a good car, I loved my car. So it was hard," Driflot said.

In some ways, Driflot was lucky because giving up driving was a pretty cut-and-dried decision. That's not the case for many seniors and that can lead to some tough conversations.

KUOW's Bill Radke spoke with Laura Fraade-Blanar, a graduate student at the University of Washington studying the link between aging and crash risks, about when and how to have those tough conversations. 

Bill Radke speaks with Luis Ceze about why we should store digital data in DNA and how it can be done. Ceze is a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Washington. He's working with Microsoft researchers on this project. 

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the impact of indigenous boarding schools. Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission has released their final report and recommendations on the issue and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised a blueprint for national reconciliation. 

Bill Radke speaks with Dawn Gearhart and Paul Guppy about whether or not for-hire drivers should be allowed to unionize in Seattle. If the Seattle City Council votes to approve legislation allowing unionization, Seattle would be the first city in the country to take this step. 

Gearhart is a union representative from Teamsters 117. Guppy is the vice president for research at the Washington Policy Center. 

Lisa Herbold at the former Linda Manor Apartments in West Seattle’s Gatewood neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Bill Radke talks to new Seattle City Councilmember Lisa Herbold, who represents West Seattle and South Park, about her top three priorities for Seattle. 

Earlier this fall, I-405 was reduced to two lanes in order to allow crews to complete final striping for the new express toll lanes. After opening, they're still causing consternation for some drivers.
Flickr Photo/WDOT (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1TFOTpT

The price of the new Interstate 405 toll lanes between Bellevue and Lynnwood hit an all-time high Thursday at $10 a trip.

The lane opened in September, for carpools or people willing to pay to use it. And it has angered some drivers.

A view from the Columbia Tower in downtown Seattle. Sheriff John Urquhart offered three tips on what to do if a shooter enters a building: run, hide or fight like hell -- in that order.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Three things you can do when a mean-mugging man with an assault rifle blazes into your office, according to King County Sheriff John Urquhart:

“The first is run,” Urquhart said. “Go out a back door, go out the front door if you can, break out a window, climb out a window.”

Plan B: Hide. Go into an office, barricade the door and keep quiet until you’re sure police are on the other side of that door.

Your third option is to be fierce.

Bill Radke speaks with Jody McVittie, head of Seattle-based nonprofit Sound Discipline, about how to change the disparity in the discipline of students of color in Seattle Public Schools. 

State legislator Brady Walkinshaw represents Washington State's 43rd District.
Courtesy of Ann Norton

David Hyde talks to Brady Walkinshaw, the young progressive candidate challenging fellow Democrat and longtime Washington congressman Jim McDermott for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. 

Larry and Mary-Jeanne Smith have been foster parents for 20 years. Mary-Jeanne Smith was also in the foster system as a child.
Courtesy of Mary-Jeanne Smith

Mary-Jeanne Smith was 13 when she ran away from home. She said she left to avoid an abusive environment.

“My parents had joined sort of a religious cult and there was a lot of physical, sexual and mental abuse,” she said.

Bill Radke speaks with Paul Guppy, vice president of research at the Washington Policy Center, and John Burbank, executive director of the Economic Opportunity Institute, about the tax breaks given to Boeing in Washington state. 

KUOW photo/Kate Walters

There was that time with the bleeding box. The one that smelled bad, really bad.

"It stunk up the entire floor," said Veta Hernandez, manager of the lost and found office at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

Seattle Seahawks photo

Running back Fred Jackson spent eight seasons with the Buffalo Bills before coming to the Seahawks at the beginning of this season. His wife and four children have stayed back East for the school year. He talked to KUOW about what Thanksgiving means to him and how he'll celebrate the holiday this year in a new city.

Lorena Gonzalez at her election night party on Nov. 3, 2015, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

David Hyde speaks with Lorena Gonzalez, the first Latina ever to be elected to the Seattle City Council, about her top priorities for her first months in office. 

Parental Leave: Is It Fair To Employees Without Kids?

Nov 23, 2015
Baby kid mom parent
Flickr Photo/DonkerDink (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/21d0GBQ

The Seattle City Council on Monday rejected another attempt to increase paid family leave for city workers from four weeks to 12. Estimated cost: $1.5 million a year.

On The Record earlier, Bill Radke heard about the pros and cons of paid parental leave from Kristen Rowe-Finkbeiner, executive director of MomsRising, and Paul Guppy, vice president of research for the Washington Policy Center.

A homeless camp beneath an Interstate 5 off-ramp in Seattle's SODO district.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The number of homeless people in Washington state is rising.

According to new numbers released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Thursday, more than 19,400 people in Washington lived in shelters or on the streets in January this year.

People gather Saturday at La Parisienne bakery in Seattle's Belltown to show support after the terrorist attacks in Paris.
KUOW photo/Kate Walters

The French anthem and cries of "Vive la France" swelled in Seattle's Belltown after a minute of silence Saturday for those killed and injured in the Paris attacks.

Mark Kopczak from Spirit Airlines shakes hands with Port of Seattle CEO Ted Fick during the announcement Thursday of Spirit's service to Sea-Tac Airport.
KUOW photo/Kate Walters

A seat: That's all you get when you buy a ticket with low-cost carrier Spirit Airlines. If you want more than that, you pay for it.

Spirit is bringing its bare-bones business model to the Seattle Tacoma International Airport, beginning service there in March.

Salmon in the Ballard Locks, Seattle, Washington.
Flickr Photo/goodmami (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MdxksX

The Wild Fish Conservancy sued federal environmental and fisheries agencies Wednesday, saying they inadequately monitor the impact of commercial salmon farms in Puget Sound.

The lawsuit says commercial farms pose many risks to wild salmon.

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