Kate Walters | KUOW News and Information

Kate Walters

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2015

Kate is a daily news reporter at KUOW. Originally from Australia, Kate studied journalism at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology before coming to work in public radio. Kate began her career as a reporter with WXXI Public Radio in Rochester, NY, where she worked as part of a Local Journalism Center (LJC) called the Innovation Trail. At KUOW, she started as a producer on The Record before joining the news desk.

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Deborah Wang speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a changing of the guard in the White House and what Canada is doing to prepare for the Trump administration. 

Amazon released an online ad for their convenience store, Amazon Go.
Screenshot from YouTube

Bill Radke speaks with Forbes staff writer Ryan Mac about Amazon's announcement that they'll open a convenience store with no checkout. Mac says to check your excitement and take the announcement with a grain of salt. 

Carlos Rodriguez has come out as undocumented after keeping his immigration status a secret for most of his life
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

For most of his life, Carlos Rodriguez had a secret.

But after this year's presidential election, he decided the time for silence was over. So, on November 18, he wrote a letter to his fellow students at Seattle University. 

President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke speaks with Wall Street Journal White House reporter Damian Paletta about Donald Trump's announcement that he'll leave his global business empire. 

Crosscut reporter David Kroman.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Crosscut reporter David Kroman about why voters in Ritzville, Washington went for Donald Trump. Kroman says their reasons don't follow the post-election narrative about poor, white middle-class voters who are experiencing economic anxiety. 

Kids are writing letters to president-elect Trump
Facebook Photo/Dear President Trump: Letters From Kids About Kindness

Any way you dice it, the election of Donald Trump has brought on a lot of feelings. 

Many adults have expressed those feelings online, on social media and through taking to the streets. But what about our kids?

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about what a Trump administration could mean for the city of Seattle. 

Washington state elector Bret Chiafalo
Courtesy of Bret Chiafalo

Thousands of Americans have protested the Trump presidency. But the election isn't completely over.

Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke speaks with Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about what a Donald Trump administration means for local businesses. 

Wikimedia commons

Bill Radke speaks with Jim Walsh, chairman of the Grays Harbor County Republican party, about why Grays Harbor county voted for Donald Trump this election. Grays Harbor was one of four western Washington counties that flipped from blue to red this election. It was the first time the county had voted Republican in 90 years. 

Seattle police shut down Third Avenue after five people were shot.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Five people were shot in downtown Seattle Wednesday night, with the shooter still at large late in the evening.

The shooting happened outside a convenience store at Third Avenue and Pine Street, near the site of an anti-Trump protest.

Crowds of people turned out across Seattle to protest against president elect Donald Trump. But Seattle Police Department spokesman Sean Whitcomb said the shooting was not related.  

Robert Satiacum, a member of Washington's Puyallup Tribe and a Washington state elector, poses for a photo, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Washington state elector Robert Satiacum, a Puyallup tribe elder, about his decision to go against the popular vote if Hillary Clinton wins the state. Satiacum, who spoke from Standing Rock where he was protesting the oil pipeline, said Clinton does not represent his America. 

Wikimedia Commons

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC radio's On The Coast, about the presidential election and how much attention Canadians are paying to it. The answer is a lot. 

Lloyd McClendon, right, was fired from the Seattle Mariners after two seasons.
Flickr Photo/Dinur (CC BY NC ND 2.0) /http://bit.ly/1VJNyhS

Bill Radke speaks with writer and radio host John Moe about the next team to take up the mantle of loveable losers in Major League Baseball. The Chicago Cubs gave up the title Wednesday night after winning the World Series. They ended a 108 year drought when they defeated the Cleveland Indians in Game 7.   


Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times health reporter JoNel Aleccia about a mysterious illness that's caused the hospitalization of nine children in Washington state this fall. One child has died so far.  

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes Thursday morning about the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Mapes is on the scene in North Dakota where the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and hundreds of supporters are continuing a months-long protest against the construction of a pipeline. 

Police moved in on Thursday to disperse protesters who have moved the front line of their demonstration onto private land. 

Seattle/King County Clinic at Key Arena will offer free health care to thousands of patients for four days.
Seattle Center Photo/Auston James

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Center's John Merner about a huge free health care clinic that's open in Seattle from Thursday, October 27, to Sunday, October 30. The clinic is set up in Key Arena and is expected to serve more than 4,000 patients who need medical, dental and vision care. 

The clinic is first come, first served with admission tickets handed out beginning at 5 a.m. each day. No ID or proof of residence is required for a patient to receive care. 

Kara Bernstine, who is homeless, said she knows the Jungle homeless encampment isn't perfectly safe, but it felt safer than other places in the city. Click on this photo to see more images of the Jungle.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Jungle has been Seattle’s largest and most persistent homeless camp. Its origins can be traced back to the 1930s.

Earlier this year, about 400 people were living in tents under the three mile stretch of Interstate 5.


Bill Radke speaks with Kyle Murphy and Ellicott Dandy about Initiative 732, which will appear on the November ballot. The initiative would introduce a carbon tax with the goal of reducing carbon emissions.

Murphy is with the Yes on 732 campaign and he wants you to vote for the initiative. Dandy is the economic and environmental justice manager for progressive group OneAmerica, she wants you to vote no. 

Kevin Boggs in his tent in the Jungle. He moved into the Jungle on Dec. 1 last winter after moving down from Lake City where his tent had been repeatedly ransacked.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Kevin Boggs is trying to find a way out of the Jungle, the large homeless camp under Interstate 5 in Seattle. But it's not that easy. Listen to some of his story to hear what he's doing in his search for stable housing. 

Seattle resident Amanda Knox on the roof of the KUOW parking garage in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

When Amanda Knox enters a coffee shop in Seattle, she just wants a cup of coffee.

Sometimes that’s what happens.

John Henry Browne, attorney for Raymond Fryberg, father of the Washington state teenager who fatally shot four classmates and himself at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle defense attorney John Henry Browne about his career and what it's like defending killers like Ted Bundy. 

Tents lined up in the Jungle, which extends north and south under Seattle's Interstate 5 corridor.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle's largest homeless camp will be shut down.

The Seattle City Council voted Monday to allow state crews to clear the area under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle.

Community members light candles for the victims of the Cascade mall shooting
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

As the suspect in a mall shooting in Burlington, Washington appeared in court Monday, the community continued to grieve for the victims. 

Bill Radke speaks with Subway franchisee owner David Jones about secure scheduling rules passed by the city of Seattle on Monday. Jones says the new rules will make things much harder for businesses like his. 

Amy Pittman received a box with sample formula from a company that got her information from a pregnancy app. Pittman had already miscarried when the box arrived.
Courtesy of Amy Pittman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Amy Pittman about her miscarriage and how the internet missed one of the biggest moments in her life. Pittman wrote an essay for the New York Times' Modern Love column about her experience. She tells Yandel what reaction she's received and how she thinks differently about big data. 

Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at Carl Hayden High School in Phoenix, Arizona in March 2016.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/FpiUUf

Bill Radke speaks with Kristen Rowe-Finkbeiner, executive director of Mom's Rising and an advocate for paid sick and family leave, about the attention being placed on Hillary Clinton's illness. Rowe-Finkbeiner says Clinton is just a symptom of a bigger problem in American workplace culture. 

Carmen and Robert Patterson have lived in the Jungle, a homeless encampment in Seattle, on and off since 2011. They and several others who live in the Jungle shared photos, stories and text messages with us.
Courtesy of Robert Patterson

Thousands of people in Seattle won’t have shelter tonight.

The problem isn’t that Seattle isn’t spending enough, according to two national experts.


Homeless families outside a shelter in downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about the city's plan to change the way it fights homelessness. A new report from national experts suggests it's time for Seattle to overhaul the service system.

A homeless encampment in what the city calls the I-5 East Duwamish Greenbelt. It's unofficially known as The Jungle. But officials say they are preparing to move the people who live here.
City of Seattle Photo

Bill Radke speaks with Josh Feit, politics editor at Seattle Met and editor of the Met's politics blog Publicola, about proposed legislation that would make it harder for the city to sweep homeless encampments. 

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