Kate Walters | KUOW News and Information

Kate Walters

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2015

Kate is a daily news reporter at KUOW. Originally from Australia, Kate studied journalism at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology before coming to work in public radio. Kate began her career as a reporter with WXXI Public Radio in Rochester, NY, where she worked as part of a Local Journalism Center (LJC) called the Innovation Trail. At KUOW, she started as a producer on The Record before joining the news desk.

Seattle resident Amanda Knox on the roof of the KUOW parking garage in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

When Amanda Knox enters a coffee shop in Seattle, she just wants a cup of coffee.

Sometimes that’s what happens.

John Henry Browne, attorney for Raymond Fryberg, father of the Washington state teenager who fatally shot four classmates and himself at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle defense attorney John Henry Browne about his career and what it's like defending killers like Ted Bundy. 

Tents lined up in the Jungle, which extends north and south under Seattle's Interstate 5 corridor.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle's largest homeless camp will be shut down.

The Seattle City Council voted Monday to allow state crews to clear the area under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle.

Community members light candles for the victims of the Cascade mall shooting
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

As the suspect in a mall shooting in Burlington, Washington appeared in court Monday, the community continued to grieve for the victims. 

Bill Radke speaks with Subway franchisee owner David Jones about secure scheduling rules passed by the city of Seattle on Monday. Jones says the new rules will make things much harder for businesses like his. 

Amy Pittman received a box with sample formula from a company that got her information from a pregnancy app. Pittman had already miscarried when the box arrived.
Courtesy of Amy Pittman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Amy Pittman about her miscarriage and how the internet missed one of the biggest moments in her life. Pittman wrote an essay for the New York Times' Modern Love column about her experience. She tells Yandel what reaction she's received and how she thinks differently about big data. 

Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at Carl Hayden High School in Phoenix, Arizona in March 2016.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/FpiUUf

Bill Radke speaks with Kristen Rowe-Finkbeiner, executive director of Mom's Rising and an advocate for paid sick and family leave, about the attention being placed on Hillary Clinton's illness. Rowe-Finkbeiner says Clinton is just a symptom of a bigger problem in American workplace culture. 

Carmen and Robert Patterson have lived in the Jungle, a homeless encampment in Seattle, on and off since 2011. They and several others who live in the Jungle shared photos, stories and text messages with us.
Courtesy of Robert Patterson

Thousands of people in Seattle won’t have shelter tonight.

The problem isn’t that Seattle isn’t spending enough, according to two national experts.


Homeless families outside a shelter in downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about the city's plan to change the way it fights homelessness. A new report from national experts suggests it's time for Seattle to overhaul the service system.

A homeless encampment in what the city calls the I-5 East Duwamish Greenbelt. It's unofficially known as The Jungle. But officials say they are preparing to move the people who live here.
City of Seattle Photo

Bill Radke speaks with Josh Feit, politics editor at Seattle Met and editor of the Met's politics blog Publicola, about proposed legislation that would make it harder for the city to sweep homeless encampments. 

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC Radio's On The Coast, about a complaint filed on behalf of Vancouver animation workers. Animators claim they worked in terrible conditions and weren't paid for overtime during the creation of the Seth Rogan film, "Sausage Party."

Kim Malcolm speaks with University of Washington professor Ali Mokdad about a study he led which shows the conflict in Syria has shaved years off the life expectancy of people in that country. 

Amber Tuccaro was killed in 2010.
Courtesy of CBC.ca

Bill Radke speaks with CBC reporter Connie Walker about the many missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada and what the government is doing to address the issue. 

Between 1980 and 2012, more than a thousand indigenous Canadian women went missing or were murdered. CBC has been doing extensive reporting on these women.

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC radio's On The Coast, about a cool down of the Vancouver housing market. 

This cartoon by Kevin Siers of The Charlotte Observer, following the police shootings in Dallas, Texas, is part of Suzzallo Library’s Editorial Cartoons exhibit.
Courtesy of Kevin Siers, The Charlotte Observer

Audio Pending...

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington librarian Jessica Albano about their political cartoon display. The display at the Suzzallo Library showcases cartoons from across the U.S. concerning 2016 election cycle and other top-of-mind issues.

The tent city where Jungle residents are being encouraged to move.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Kate Walters about the way unauthorized homeless camps around Seattle are being cleared out. While a lot of care is being taken to provide outreach to residents of the encampment under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle, outreach and services have not been uniformly made available during sweeps of other homeless camps. 

An artist's rendering of the proposed new North Precinct station for the Seattle Police Department.
City of Seattle

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Weekly reporter Casey Jaywork about the new police station planned in North Seattle and how it became a symbol of race and police violence. 

Simone Biles, a 4'8" package of muscle, performs at an Olympic exhibition gala after having won four gold medals and one bronze in the 2016 Games. What she is wearing is not relevant.
AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky

It's heartbreaking to Lindy West that young women work hard, become the best in the world at a difficult sport, and their moment of triumph turns into: "Man's sex companion does something, I guess." 

West laughed as she said this. But it's not really a joke. In fact, she's incensed by the way female Olympians have been talked about during the Rio Olympics. 

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a rise in birth tourism in Canada. Anyone born in Canada is automatically a citizen. This is prompting women from other countries to fly to Canada to have their children and give them the opportunity for dual citizenship.

Courtesy of David Moskowitz

Bill Radke speaks with biologist and conservationist David Moskowitz about the dwindling herd of mountain caribou in Washington state and what that tells us about the state of conservation efforts today. 

Derek Micheau (bottom) competes in e-sports. He received a scholarship from Robert Morris University for online gaming.
Courtesy of Derek Micheau

Derek Micheau grew up playing baseball in Olympia, Washington. He recently got a sports scholarship to Robert Morris University in Chicago, but not for America’s favorite pastime.

Instead, Derek will be the first student in America to graduate with a  scholarship in e-sports.

Bill Radke speaks with Dylan Orr, director of Seattle's Office of Labor Standards, about the new secure scheduling rules proposed by the city and what they would mean for local businesses and workers. 

The tent city where Jungle residents are being encouraged to move.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle is taking new action to move homeless people out of the Jungle, a greenbelt under Interstate 5 near downtown.

Once people are out, the state plans to clear out garbage and improve access roads.

U.S. swimmer Wendy Boglioli dives in to the pool to begin the second heat in the women's 100 meter butterfly competition at the Olympic pool in Montreal, Canada, July 21, 1976.
AP Photo/Harry Cabluck

At the summer Olympics, 19-year-old American swimmer Lilly King is making headlines – and not just for winning gold.

After beating Russian swimmer Yulia Efimova, King openly condemned the Russian swim team for doping.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about how Canadians are reacting to Trump's run for the presidency. One worry is that if Trump wins the White House it will mean an end to NAFTA. 

AR-15 rifle with a Stag lower receiver California legal (only with fixed 10-round magazine)
Wikimedia Commons

The day after the Orlando nightclub shooting, Tami Michaels, a Seattle talk show host, took to Facebook.

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jerry Large about a group of white Seattleites who have been going door-to-door asking neighbors to put Black Lives Matter signs in their yards. Hear about the reactions they got and how Large's readers reacted to his coverage. 

The Japanese Garden in the Washington Park Arboretum, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/GD Taber (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8s5xjo

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes about Seattle trees, why they're dying and what that tells us about the state of the environment. 

Scan from professor Adam Summers' project.
Courtesy of Adam Summers

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington professor Adam Summers about his project that aims to scan all the species of fish in the world. Summers is a biomechanist and provided technical advice for the movies "Finding Nemo" and "Finding Dory." 

Amber Hayward and her sons
Courtesy of Amber Hayward

Amber Hayward's kids weren't sold when she started speaking Lushootseed at home. It sounded different and some of the words were hard to say. 

But Hayward kept at it. She made her bathroom, where she gets ready, an English-free zone. From there she hollered at her kids in Lushootseed to guide them through their morning routine: Brush your teeth, get dressed, wash your face. And in time, her kids got on board. 

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