Kate Walters | KUOW News and Information

Kate Walters

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2015

Kate is a daily news reporter at KUOW. Originally from Australia, Kate studied journalism at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology before coming to work in public radio. Kate began her career as a reporter with WXXI Public Radio in Rochester, NY, where she worked as part of a Local Journalism Center (LJC) called the Innovation Trail. At KUOW, she started as a producer on The Record before joining the news desk.

Alan Sugiyama in an interview on CityStream in 2016. He dedicated his life and career to social justice. He died January 2, 2017.
City of Seattle

Local civil rights leader Alan Sugiyama died Monday at the age of 67 after a two-year battle with cancer.

He emerged as a leader in the Asian-American rights movement at a young age, co-founding the Oriental Student Union at Seattle Central Community College.

President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

University of Washington law students will keep a close watch on President-elect Donald Trump during his first months in office.

The law school is offering a brand-new course on presidential power.


Canadian flag
Flickr Photo/Alex Indigo (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4eDBug

Patricia Murphy speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the big stories in Canada in 2016. Many Canadians are glad to see the year come to a close; a poll shows most people think 2016 brought more bad than good for their country, the U.S. and the world as a whole.

File: King County, Wash. Sheriff John Urquhart testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013, before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

A lawsuit has brought to light allegations that King County sheriff John Urquhart tried to quash a rape accusation against him.

Shell Oil's Polar Pioneer sits at anchor aboard the Blue Marlin in Port Angeles.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a move by President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to make oil and gas development off limits in Arctic waters.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Kirby Wilbur and John Nichols about whether or not the Electoral College should be abolished. Wilbur is the former chair of the Washington state Republican party and a host on KVI talk radio. Nichols is the national affairs correspondent for The Nation. 

Hand prints at the base of the new sign outside the Muslim Association of Puget Sound
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The largest mosque in the Northwest put up an unexpected sign on Friday: Not a promotional banner, but a response to what the community calls an act of hate.

Just a couple of weeks ago, Mahmood Khadeer arrived at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound to see their granite sign cracked and damaged. It had been vandalized overnight.

Braedon Wilkerson, Olga Farnam and Manis Pierre were all involved with the state GOP this year. Their views on Trump differ widely
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Deborah Wang speaks with Washington State Republican Party chair Susan Hutchison. She also speaks with Olga Farnam, Manis Pierre and Braedon Wilkerson. 

Photo taken from a Japanese plane during the Pearl Harbor attack
Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy

Fujiko Tamura Gardner was 9 years old when Pearl Harbor was attacked. She remembers hearing about it on the radio at her parents’ farm in Fife, Washington.

“I just remember the horror and not really understanding what was going on and what was going to happen,” Gardner said.

State Democratic Party Chair Jaxon Ravens predicts strong caucus turnout, but shy of the record set in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Deborah Wang speaks with Washington state Democratic Party chairman Jaxon Ravens about the future of the party. She also speaks with Jessa Lewis, Alec Stephens and Tamborine Borrelli. 

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Deborah Wang speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a changing of the guard in the White House and what Canada is doing to prepare for the Trump administration. 

Amazon released an online ad for their convenience store, Amazon Go.
Screenshot from YouTube

Bill Radke speaks with Forbes staff writer Ryan Mac about Amazon's announcement that they'll open a convenience store with no checkout. Mac says to check your excitement and take the announcement with a grain of salt. 

Carlos Rodriguez has come out as undocumented after keeping his immigration status a secret for most of his life
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

For most of his life, Carlos Rodriguez had a secret.

But after this year's presidential election, he decided the time for silence was over. So, on November 18, he wrote a letter to his fellow students at Seattle University. 

President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke speaks with Wall Street Journal White House reporter Damian Paletta about Donald Trump's announcement that he'll leave his global business empire. 

Crosscut reporter David Kroman.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Crosscut reporter David Kroman about why voters in Ritzville, Washington went for Donald Trump. Kroman says their reasons don't follow the post-election narrative about poor, white middle-class voters who are experiencing economic anxiety. 

Kids are writing letters to president-elect Trump
Facebook Photo/Dear President Trump: Letters From Kids About Kindness

Any way you dice it, the election of Donald Trump has brought on a lot of feelings. 

Many adults have expressed those feelings online, on social media and through taking to the streets. But what about our kids?

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about what a Trump administration could mean for the city of Seattle. 

Washington state elector Bret Chiafalo
Courtesy of Bret Chiafalo

Thousands of Americans have protested the Trump presidency. But the election isn't completely over.

Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke speaks with Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about what a Donald Trump administration means for local businesses. 

Wikimedia commons

Bill Radke speaks with Jim Walsh, chairman of the Grays Harbor County Republican party, about why Grays Harbor county voted for Donald Trump this election. Grays Harbor was one of four western Washington counties that flipped from blue to red this election. It was the first time the county had voted Republican in 90 years. 

Seattle police shut down Third Avenue after five people were shot.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Five people were shot in downtown Seattle Wednesday night, with the shooter still at large late in the evening.

The shooting happened outside a convenience store at Third Avenue and Pine Street, near the site of an anti-Trump protest.

Crowds of people turned out across Seattle to protest against president elect Donald Trump. But Seattle Police Department spokesman Sean Whitcomb said the shooting was not related.  

Robert Satiacum, a member of Washington's Puyallup Tribe and a Washington state elector, poses for a photo, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Washington state elector Robert Satiacum, a Puyallup tribe elder, about his decision to go against the popular vote if Hillary Clinton wins the state. Satiacum, who spoke from Standing Rock where he was protesting the oil pipeline, said Clinton does not represent his America. 

Wikimedia Commons

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC radio's On The Coast, about the presidential election and how much attention Canadians are paying to it. The answer is a lot. 

Lloyd McClendon, right, was fired from the Seattle Mariners after two seasons.
Flickr Photo/Dinur (CC BY NC ND 2.0) /http://bit.ly/1VJNyhS

Bill Radke speaks with writer and radio host John Moe about the next team to take up the mantle of loveable losers in Major League Baseball. The Chicago Cubs gave up the title Wednesday night after winning the World Series. They ended a 108 year drought when they defeated the Cleveland Indians in Game 7.   


Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times health reporter JoNel Aleccia about a mysterious illness that's caused the hospitalization of nine children in Washington state this fall. One child has died so far.  

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes Thursday morning about the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Mapes is on the scene in North Dakota where the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and hundreds of supporters are continuing a months-long protest against the construction of a pipeline. 

Police moved in on Thursday to disperse protesters who have moved the front line of their demonstration onto private land. 

Seattle/King County Clinic at Key Arena will offer free health care to thousands of patients for four days.
Seattle Center Photo/Auston James

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Center's John Merner about a huge free health care clinic that's open in Seattle from Thursday, October 27, to Sunday, October 30. The clinic is set up in Key Arena and is expected to serve more than 4,000 patients who need medical, dental and vision care. 

The clinic is first come, first served with admission tickets handed out beginning at 5 a.m. each day. No ID or proof of residence is required for a patient to receive care. 

Kara Bernstine, who is homeless, said she knows the Jungle homeless encampment isn't perfectly safe, but it felt safer than other places in the city. Click on this photo to see more images of the Jungle.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Jungle has been Seattle’s largest and most persistent homeless camp. Its origins can be traced back to the 1930s.

Earlier this year, about 400 people were living in tents under the three mile stretch of Interstate 5.


Bill Radke speaks with Kyle Murphy and Ellicott Dandy about Initiative 732, which will appear on the November ballot. The initiative would introduce a carbon tax with the goal of reducing carbon emissions.

Murphy is with the Yes on 732 campaign and he wants you to vote for the initiative. Dandy is the economic and environmental justice manager for progressive group OneAmerica, she wants you to vote no. 

Kevin Boggs in his tent in the Jungle. He moved into the Jungle on Dec. 1 last winter after moving down from Lake City where his tent had been repeatedly ransacked.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Kevin Boggs is trying to find a way out of the Jungle, the large homeless camp under Interstate 5 in Seattle. But it's not that easy. Listen to some of his story to hear what he's doing in his search for stable housing. 

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