Kara McDermott

Web Producer

Kara McDermott is a graduate of the University of Washington where she received a B.A. in English and a certificate in editing. A former intern of the KUOW web department, she brings her experience in fixing web-breaking em dashes to the role of web producer. Kara has worked as a freelance editor and business office manager to develop her skills in web maintenance, marketing and communication.

In 2011, she parlayed her passion for journalism and sport by becoming the women’s soccer editor for Prost Amerika. She covers the top local leagues as well as the US National Team, traveling recently to Portugal for the Algarve Cup and to Vancouver to cover the Olympic Qualifying Tournament. Kara has been an active volunteer for the American Cancer Society as event chair for the Green Lake Relay for Life since 2010.

Though now retired from contact sports, Kara continues to play flag football on the weekends and is a member and instructor for the Bollywood Seattle Performers, a local professional dance troupe. She is also an avid ballroom dancer.

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Bertha's Progress

Mar 21, 2014
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bertha, the world's biggest tunneling machine, is a five-story-tall monstrosity of drilling tasked with digging out the tunnel for State Route 99 to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Courtesy of Steven J Pickens

In 1948, at the height of discontent over a Puget Sound transportation controversy, a group of agitated locals, nicknamed the “Vashon vigilantes,” prevented the ferry Illahee from docking.

A local business man, two candidates for governor and a network of traversing boats came to a head over a seemingly simple issue: how much to charge to cross the waterways between cities and islands.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Cherie LaMaine is a ferry walker on the Edmonds-Kingston line: She makes laps around the deck as the boat glides from port to port.

The habit started with her husband when he needed to make frequent trips to Swedish Hospital. “We would still walk, holding hands,” LaMaine said. “He couldn't walk too fast, but it was great.”

Jay Inslee's Facebook page.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee issued a moratorium Tuesday on the use of the death penalty in Washington state during his term.

Courtesy of mikerussellfoto.com/Mike Russell

When US Soccer announced last year where national team members would play in the inaugural season of the National Women’s Soccer League, Seattle Reign FC scored offensive powerhouse Amy Rodriguez.

But Rodriguez, 26, would never play a single game for Seattle.

After the teams were set, Rodriguez found out that she was pregnant and unavailable for the season. “We were quite surprised. We weren’t planning on starting a family this year,” Rodriguez told KUOW.

A tradition in Europe since World War II, "adventure playgrounds" look like junkyards and may be just as dangerous. Adults watch from a distance, making gentle suggestions like "perhaps you might try putting the fire out this way?" The link below will take you to a fascinating radio documentary that calls into questions all our assumptions about childhood risks - and what kids might miss out on when we eliminate all those risks. Warning to parents: this piece may cause you to ache with a vague sense of unease.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Below are the results of the Nov. 5 elections. Results are as of 11/5/2013 at 9:21 p.m. Please be aware that due to write-ins, percentages might not add up to 100 percent.

  • Ed Murray: 56%
  • Mike McGinn: 43%

Related Content: KUOW's Coverage Of The Seattle Mayor's Race

Counties Reporting: 39/39

Initiative 517: Concerning Protections For Initiative Signature Gatherers

Once a symbol of freedom from the city, now despised amongst urban hipsters. Why have culs-de-sac fallen out of favor? Because they don't work very well, but also because wealth has shifted away from suburbs and into cities.

English is not necessary if you speak baseball.

Kenya had a lot of press coverage during the attack on the Westgate mall last month. The stories revealed deep class divisions in East Africa. Some entrepreneurs from Nairobi's thriving startup economy are using technology to bridge that divide between rich and poor.

National anthems often celebrate a country's triumph over its former oppressors, like the US national anthem. But in South Africa, the national anthem very consciously combines the music of the African National Congress with the anthem of Afrikaaner apartheid. Call it reconciliation through mashup.

From the Stand With Our Checkers Facebook page.

With just two hours left on the strike countdown clock, a tentative agreement was reached on Monday night between grocery workers and four major chains: Safeway, Fred Meyer, QFC and Albertson’s.

For Tom Jenkins, a senior at the University of Washington and a veteran of the Air Force, the partial government shutdown has caused double stress: He has been furloughed from his part-time job as a reservist, and he may not receive veteran’s benefits.

Golden Dawn party members are on trial today in Greece. Golden Dawn is an anti-immigrant party on the rise there. The government cracked down on the group over the weekend. They're responding to a toxic stew of racism and poverty reminiscent of pre-WW2 Germany.

At Columbia University in New York, a historian named Mathew Connelly is working with computer scientists and statisticians on a “declassification engine.” It’s a project that will not just archive millions of declassified government documents, but also mine them for hidden patterns that reveal what the US government chooses to keep secret and why. This story was featured in the pilot episode of the new public radio series focusing on investigative journalism called "Reveal."

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