Kara McDermott | KUOW News and Information

Kara McDermott

Web Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2013

A former intern of the KUOW web department, Kara was hired as a web producer in 2013. She supports KUOW's web content with graphics, photography and video. 

She is a graduate of the University of Washington where she received a B.A. in English and certificates in editing and data visualization. Kara has worked as a freelance editor, soccer reporter and business office manager.

Ways to Connect

A quick glance around Lake Union and you can tell there’s a lot of science happening in our state. With the Trump administration threatening cuts to research funding, we examined how much money this could mean for Washington state.

First of all, it’s difficult to lasso all the federal dollars going to science. So we zeroed in on two big agencies to get an overview: the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, looking at their reports for the 2016 fiscal year.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announces a lawsuit against the Trump administration on March 29, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle will not be bullied into helping with federal immigration enforcement, Mayor Murray said on Wednesday. The city is taking the Trump administration to court over what it calls “an unconstitutional order.”


Commander Brian Martinez of the Black Diamond Police Department.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Black Diamond is a small city on the verge of big growth.

It recently came through a budget crisis that threatened to shut down the city – including its police department.

Kara McDermott of KUOW's Region of Boom talked with Commander Brian Martinez about how the city is now moving forward.

For this map, we combined a map from 1919 with Google maps to approximate modern roads and living areas. We then took satellite maps from the City of Black Diamond showing proposed new developments and sketched those out as well.
KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

A mega housing development is going up in Black Diamond outside Seattle, and some of those houses could be built on top of old mine shafts.

Developments are popping up all over Marysville.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marysville is the fastest growing big city in Western Washington.

In part that’s due to people leaving the Seattle housing market to find more affordable housing in a place a commutable distance away.


KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

If you live in Seattle, four democracy vouchers will soon arrive in the mail.

What to do with them? Ideally, you would be inspired by a political candidate and mail them your vouchers in lieu of actual cash.

A Lamborghini at the University of Washington. Nearly 2,000 cars in Seattle are listed as having cost more than $80,349 – the current median household income for Seattle.
Flickr Photo/ericnvntr (CC BY 2.0) http://bit.ly/2dla8Pz

The most expensive car in Seattle is a $653,000 Enzo Ferrari (2003). It is registered to someone who lives somewhere downtown. 

It ties with an Enzo Ferrari in tony Medina for most expensive car in King County, followed by a Ferrari F40 in Bellevue that cost $643,000.

Washington refugees world map
KUOW/Kara McDermott

“Sincerely, if I told you the truth, you cannot achieve or reach your aim if you don’t struggle. So now, I’m struggling.”

Those are the words of Osman Mohamed, a refugee from Somalia who settled in Washington this year with his wife and three children. He grapples with past trauma and with moving forward in a new country.

We followed Mohamed's story and also those of Tu Tu from Myanmar (Burma) and an Iranian couple, Peiman Karimi and Neda Sharifi Khalafabadi, for their first eight months in the U.S.

Perseid meteor shower at Mount Catherine off Snoqualmie Pass near Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The Perseids come in July, but they burn most bright this week in August. 

This sends people into the woods, into the darkness, where they can see these electric meteor showers that, according to people who have seen them, burn into your memory.  

Bernie Sanders addresses the Washington state delegates at breakfast Wednesday morning.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night as the first woman to receive the presidential nomination from a major political party. Not everyone was jovial about it, though. 

Some of Washington's delegates who support Bernie Sanders left the convention hall to stage a protest in the media area.

Bill Tytus took over Pocock Racing Shells in 1985 from Stan Pocock, the son of founder George Pocock.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

It takes about six minutes for the University of Washington’s top men’s rowing team to power the latest model Pocock racing shell on their home course through the Montlake Cut. 

But it took the factory in Everett, Washington, 260 work hours to get the boat to that point.

The University of Washington Men's Rowing team prepares for an early morning practice.
KUOW Photo/Matt Mills McKnight

The early morning water is usually calm in Seattle. That makes it the preferred time for rowers.

It’s beautiful as the sun rises over the water as the University of Washington’s rowing team heads out for practice.

But the peace doesn’t last.

Kim and Brad Lancaster and their dog, Sofie.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Brad Lancaster is an attorney. His wife Kim is a paralegal. They live in a small 770-square-foot house with their dog Sofie in Shoreline, Washington. 

When KUOW visited recently, 16 homeless people had also set up their tents in the backyard. That makes 18 people sharing one bathroom, one small kitchen and one washer/dryer.

In this Feb. 10, 2015, photo, Seattle's Space Needle and several construction cranes are shown from the operating cab of a 238-foot high construction crane working on a new building in Seattle's South Lake Union neighborhood.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

We have been collecting audience responses about changes they are seeing in the Seattle region as part of our Region of Boom project.  

You sent us hundreds of responses detailing the frustrations of a booming city and how the physical shifts in and around Seattle are affecting your life in the region.

Seattle City Council District 2 candidates Tammy Morales and Bruce Harrell.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Under the pressure of a mic test at the KUOW studios, Bruce Harrell could not remember the recitation, “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,” so Tammy Morales, his Seattle City Council District 2 opponent, stepped in, noting with a laugh that she has a 5-year-old.

Pages