Kara McDermott

Web Producer

Kara McDermott is a graduate of the University of Washington where she received a B.A. in English and a certificate in editing. A former intern of the KUOW web department, she brings her experience in fixing web-breaking em dashes to the role of web producer. Kara has worked as a freelance editor and business office manager to develop her skills in web maintenance, marketing and communication.

In 2011, she parlayed her passion for journalism and sport by becoming the women’s soccer editor for Prost Amerika. She covers the top local leagues as well as the US National Team, traveling recently to Portugal for the Algarve Cup and to Vancouver to cover the Olympic Qualifying Tournament. Kara has been an active volunteer for the American Cancer Society as event chair for the Green Lake Relay for Life since 2010.

Though now retired from contact sports, Kara continues to play flag football on the weekends and is a member and instructor for the Bollywood Seattle Performers, a local professional dance troupe. She is also an avid ballroom dancer.

Ways To Connect

Glaciers set the North Cascades apart. Their runoff allows fish to navigate streams when rainfall is scarce. Their trickle gathers in rivers with currents powerful enough to generate hydroelectricity for millions of residents. But they're not powerful enough to withstand climate change.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

When asked to describe South Lake Union in a word, KUOW’s Bill Radke chose “treacherous.”

“I rarely go to SLU so I forget it’s no longer deserted. Intersections that used to be a rolling stop now have cyclists and dogs and cycling dogs and chatting friends who just go!” he explained.

FIFA, the international soccer federation, has released its official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup.

It’s an artistic rendering of a woman looking up serenely as her long flowing locks are swept away from her face in graceful curves.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

In a unanimous vote, to a standing ovation, the Seattle City Council approved a bill to increase the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.

The crowd cheered “We made 15 possible!” after the reading of the vote tally in a meeting marked with passionate pleas for its passage from the public as well as council members.

Failed Amendments

The packed crowd of vocal proponents for the passage of the bill, many of whom gave their personal stories during the section of public comment, booed the failure of four amendments to the City Council’s plan.

Flickr Photo/PJMixer (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Affordable housing means spending 30 percent or less of household income on housing, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Kathleen O’Toole, formerly the Boston police commissioner and Ireland’s chief inspector, has been selected as Mayor Ed Murray's nominee as Seattle's top cop.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Seattle’s minimum wage could increase to $18.13 an hour within the next decade, according to Mayor Ed Murray's office.

Speaking at Town Hall on Thursday, Murray said that large businesses would have to pay their employees $15 an hour in three years.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and his Income Inequaltiy Committee have not yet reached an agreement in raising the minimum wage.

Murray was expected to announce an initial proposal for the City Council at a press conference Thursday afternoon, but said that though the committee had reached an agreement in principle, there was not yet a viable proposal.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

As the local community held Sunday church services a week after the devastating Oso mudslide, searchers continued their work in the sodden destruction zone.

The Snohomish County Medical Examiner confirmed on Sunday evening that 21 people have died in the mudslide. Of these, only 15 have been officially identified.

Flickr Photo/GovInslee (National Guard) (CC-BY-NC-ND)

With 100 percent chance of rain in the forecast for Friday, Snohomish County Fire District 21 Chief Travis Hots held a brief conference in the morning to update on the progress of the Oso mudslide.

Hots said the rain makes the efforts of the workers in the debris field, now in their seventh day of search operations, slow and complicated. “We’ve got a hard day ahead of us,” Hots said.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Snohomish County Fire District 21 Chief Travis Hots was not at the press conferences on Wednesday after he was urged to get some rest in the wake of the ongoing response to the fatal Oso mudslide.

Instead, Hots said he headed to the site of the slide to survey the area and interact with the volunteers who continue to dig through the swampy conditions with bulldozers, shovels and their hands in an attempt to find people believed to be buried in the mud.

Salman Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton."

It was Valentine’s Day 1989 when Salman Rushdie got a call from a BBC reporter. She asked him how it felt to be sentenced to death by the Ayatollah Khomeini. He thought, “I’m a dead man.”

Starting at the age of 41, Rushdie spent almost 10 years living under the threat of murder because of a book he’d written, "The Satanic Verses."

Bertha's Progress

Mar 21, 2014
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bertha, the world's biggest tunneling machine, is a five-story-tall monstrosity of drilling tasked with digging out the tunnel for State Route 99 to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Courtesy of Steven J Pickens

In 1948, at the height of discontent over a Puget Sound transportation controversy, a group of agitated locals, nicknamed the “Vashon vigilantes,” prevented the ferry Illahee from docking.

A local business man, two candidates for governor and a network of traversing boats came to a head over a seemingly simple issue: how much to charge to cross the waterways between cities and islands.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Cherie LaMaine is a ferry walker on the Edmonds-Kingston line: She makes laps around the deck as the boat glides from port to port.

The habit started with her husband when he needed to make frequent trips to Swedish Hospital. “We would still walk, holding hands,” LaMaine said. “He couldn't walk too fast, but it was great.”

Pages