Kara McDermott | KUOW News and Information

Kara McDermott

Web Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2013

A former intern of the KUOW web department, Kara was hired as a web producer in 2013. She supports KUOW's web content with graphics, photography and video. 

She is a graduate of the University of Washington where she received a B.A. in English and certificates in editing and data visualization. Kara has worked as a freelance editor, soccer reporter and business office manager.

Ways to Connect

Display at the Valentinetti Puppet Museum in downtown Bremerton, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Starting Monday it will only take half an hour to reach Bremerton if you take Kitsap Transit’s fast ferry. It runs from the King County dock just south of Colman dock – the one used by the water taxis – to a dock close to WSDOT’s car ferry terminal in Bremerton.

Until today, a car trip from downtown Seattle to Snohomish County took less time than a ferry trip to Bremerton. Now, the opposite is true. 

Washington state Rep. Judy Warnick applauds after the capital budget is adopted as the last bill of the 2013 session
Flickr Photo/Washington State House Republicans (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eZUQFW

A quick glance around Lake Union and you can tell there’s a lot of science happening in our state. With the Trump administration threatening cuts to research funding, we examined how much money this could mean for Washington state.

First of all, it’s difficult to lasso all the federal dollars going to science. So we zeroed in on two big agencies to get an overview: the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, looking at their reports for the 2016 fiscal year.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announces a lawsuit against the Trump administration on March 29, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle will not be bullied into helping with federal immigration enforcement, Mayor Murray said on Wednesday. The city is taking the Trump administration to court over what it calls “an unconstitutional order.”


Commander Brian Martinez of the Black Diamond Police Department.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Black Diamond is a small city on the verge of big growth.

It recently came through a budget crisis that threatened to shut down the city – including its police department.

Kara McDermott of KUOW's Region of Boom talked with Commander Brian Martinez about how the city is now moving forward.

For this map, we combined a map from 1919 with Google maps to approximate modern roads and living areas. We then took satellite maps from the City of Black Diamond showing proposed new developments and sketched those out as well.
KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

A mega housing development is going up in Black Diamond outside Seattle, and some of those houses could be built on top of old mine shafts.

Developments are popping up all over Marysville.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marysville is the fastest growing big city in Western Washington.

In part that’s due to people leaving the Seattle housing market to find more affordable housing in a place a commutable distance away.


KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

If you live in Seattle, four democracy vouchers will soon arrive in the mail.

What to do with them? Ideally, you would be inspired by a political candidate and mail them your vouchers in lieu of actual cash.

A Lamborghini at the University of Washington. Nearly 2,000 cars in Seattle are listed as having cost more than $80,349 – the current median household income for Seattle.
Flickr Photo/ericnvntr (CC BY 2.0) http://bit.ly/2dla8Pz

The most expensive car in Seattle is a $653,000 Enzo Ferrari (2003). It is registered to someone who lives somewhere downtown. 

It ties with an Enzo Ferrari in tony Medina for most expensive car in King County, followed by a Ferrari F40 in Bellevue that cost $643,000.

Washington refugees world map
KUOW/Kara McDermott

“Sincerely, if I told you the truth, you cannot achieve or reach your aim if you don’t struggle. So now, I’m struggling.”

Those are the words of Osman Mohamed, a refugee from Somalia who settled in Washington this year with his wife and three children. He grapples with past trauma and with moving forward in a new country.

We followed Mohamed's story and also those of Tu Tu from Myanmar (Burma) and an Iranian couple, Peiman Karimi and Neda Sharifi Khalafabadi, for their first eight months in the U.S.

Perseid meteor shower at Mount Catherine off Snoqualmie Pass near Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The Perseids come in July, but they burn most bright this week in August. 

This sends people into the woods, into the darkness, where they can see these electric meteor showers that, according to people who have seen them, burn into your memory.  

Bernie Sanders addresses the Washington state delegates at breakfast Wednesday morning.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night as the first woman to receive the presidential nomination from a major political party. Not everyone was jovial about it, though. 

Some of Washington's delegates who support Bernie Sanders left the convention hall to stage a protest in the media area.

Bill Tytus took over Pocock Racing Shells in 1985 from Stan Pocock, the son of founder George Pocock.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

It takes about six minutes for the University of Washington’s top men’s rowing team to power the latest model Pocock racing shell on their home course through the Montlake Cut. 

But it took the factory in Everett, Washington, 260 work hours to get the boat to that point.

The University of Washington Men's Rowing team prepares for an early morning practice.
KUOW Photo/Matt Mills McKnight

The early morning water is usually calm in Seattle. That makes it the preferred time for rowers.

It’s beautiful as the sun rises over the water as the University of Washington’s rowing team heads out for practice.

But the peace doesn’t last.

Kim and Brad Lancaster and their dog, Sofie.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Brad Lancaster is an attorney. His wife Kim is a paralegal. They live in a small 770-square-foot house with their dog Sofie in Shoreline, Washington. 

When KUOW visited recently, 16 homeless people had also set up their tents in the backyard. That makes 18 people sharing one bathroom, one small kitchen and one washer/dryer.

A view of Seattle's future: Income tax and apartment construction?
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

We have been collecting audience responses about changes they are seeing in the Seattle region as part of our Region of Boom project.  

You sent us hundreds of responses detailing the frustrations of a booming city and how the physical shifts in and around Seattle are affecting your life in the region.

Seattle City Council District 2 candidates Tammy Morales and Bruce Harrell.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Under the pressure of a mic test at the KUOW studios, Bruce Harrell could not remember the recitation, “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,” so Tammy Morales, his Seattle City Council District 2 opponent, stepped in, noting with a laugh that she has a 5-year-old.

Kim Little (left) of Seattle Reign FC plays at Memorial Stadium in Seattle during an 2015 NWSL match/
Courtesy of Seattle Reign FC

This morning, NPR listeners heard Frank Deford’s take on why women’s sports get so little attention:

There aren’t that many women’s team sports. You look at the Women’s World Cup in soccer, it got tremendous coverage. Good grief, it really led coverage for a week or so. But once it was over, there was no carry over -- there was no women’s soccer league to go on and to pick up that attention.

Northwest soccer fans took to social media to point out that, um, what about Seattle Reign FC? A team that, by the way, will play Kansas City FC in the National Women’s Soccer League championship on Thursday. 

The super blood moon over Seattle on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015.
Flickr Photo/David Lee (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1FwX1qZ

The Northwest was was treated with a spectacular sky show Sunday night as a lunar eclipse coincided with a supermoon -- a full moon when it's at its closest to Earth on its orbit. Clear autumn skies allowed for prime viewing.

The phenomenon hasn't happened in 33 years, and we'll have to wait another 18 to see it again in 2033 (we however do not yet have a forecast on what the weather will be like that day).

A hard-working border collie competes at the 2015 Vashon Sheepdog Classic.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

You have to feel for sheepdogs.

Sheep get cranky in the sun, they’re afraid of being penned and they don’t always like to stay together. And just when a dog has them in the right direction, they veer off at the last possible moment. They’re the worst.

KUOW Illustration

How well do you know the Seattle City Council district you live in? In 2013, Seattle voted to split the city into seven districts to elect council members with two more members elected at-large. This year will be the first election under that system.

The crowd warms up before a live broadcast Friday of KUOW's Week in Review at the Leif Erikson Lodge in Ballard.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ballard residents and locals from surrounding areas (and two from Clinton, Whidbey Island) crowded into the Leif Erikson Lodge in the heart of the neighborhood for KUOW's Week in Review summer tour stop. 

Based on their reaction to the panel's discussion, most share concerns of the new normal in Ballard: development, and the aches that come with it, like transportation, parking and housing affordability. 

We grabbed three from the audience to help us understand a little more about the flavor and trials of the historically "Norswegian" part of Seattle. 

Darwin is an Airedale Terrier from West Seattle. This photo was taken at Rock Away Beach in Oregon. There are 96 other licensed Airedale terriers in Seattle and 22 dogs named Darwin.
Courtesy of Kylie Della

There is a cat in Seattle named Schrodinger. We don't know if it is alive or dead, but the point is that Seattleites get creative when naming their pets.

Nerdy creative.

American fans march fill the street as they march to the final match at BC Place.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

VANCOUVER, B.C. -- The streets of Vancouver were abuzz this weekend as U.S. soccer fans poured into the city to watch the showdown between the U.S. Women’s National Team and Japan in the final of the World Cup.

With the final game just over the border at BC Place, fans from Washington state made their way north.

The U.S. played against Nigeria in their final group match of the World Cup at BC Place, Vancouver, BC. Their 1-0 win allowed them to win their group before going into the knockout stage.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW web producer and freelance soccer reporter Kara McDermott about the progress of the U.S. women's national soccer team in this year's World Cup in Canada. The U.S. survived group play in the group of death and will play for a quarterfinal position Monday night against Colombia.

Stackhouse Apartments, South Lake Union
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Rents across Seattle have risen dramatically in the past 16 years, according to a KUOW analysis of housing data.

Since 1998, the average cost of a one-bedroom apartment has risen 38 percent, measured in 2014 dollars. That’s pushed the average cost to $1,412 per month. 

Melinda Jankord-Steedman and Phyllis Jantz at the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center for the 'Week in Review' summer tour stop on Friday, May 29.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Affordable housing – that issue is atop the minds of a lot of people in West Seattle and beyond.

KUOW's Week in Review broadcast live Friday from Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle's Delridge area to kick off the show's summer tour through all of the newly formed Seattle City Council districts (find yours on our district map). 

Michelle, 26, and Benjamin, 27, spend time together on their bed at the back of their school bus. Michelle works as a janitor and Benjamin is employed as a dishwasher. They shower at community centers or at friend's homes.  Both of them consider themselve
KUOW Photo/Suzanne Tennant

Smoke rises from an old school bus parked in the Interbay area of Seattle – but it’s not coming from the tailpipe. Inside, Michelle, 26, is adding fuel to the wood-burning stove.

She lives in it with her boyfriend, Benjamin, 27. The couple prefer to call their lifestyle “houseless” instead of “homeless.” They consider themselves a part of a growing community of people getting by in vehicles across Seattle — some by choice, others as a last option.

KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

In 2002, when the Bush administration started pushing cities to adopt 10-year plans to reduce homelessness, Seattle/King County was already on board.

The feds suggested targeting chronic homelessness – typically the most visibly homeless people. But Seattle was ambitious and promised to end all homelessness by 2015.  

It’s been 10 years since the Seattle plan was launched, and the number of homeless people here has surged. This isn’t a national trend – across the county, homelessness has dropped by nearly a quarter.

Jessica Cote picks up her daughter, Anna Cote, at the Spartan Recreation Center in Shoreline after students were moved to that location for reunification Wednesday morning, Jan.7.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Updated at 4:11 p.m., 1/7/2015:

Reports of an armed male on school grounds sent Shoreline schools into lockdown on Wednesday morning, said Sergeant DB Gates of the King County Sheriff's Office.

Lockdown was lifted at 10:15 a.m., and students were sent home. Police stayed at schools until all students were safely released.

An armed male was reportedly seen at Meridian Park Elementary at Meridian Avenue North and North 175th. Police released a limited description of the man on Twitter: "Only suspect is a male, camo pants, dark hoodie. Unknown race, unknown age. Had a firearm."

A food service employee spotted the man; staff at the elementary school called 911 at 7:50 a.m. Children had been at the school as early as 6:30 a.m. for child care.

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