Joshua McNichols | KUOW News and Information

Joshua McNichols

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2007

Joshua has been the "growing pains" reporter since 2015, documenting the region's growth and change. 

Joshua “took the long way” to radio, working in architecture firms for over a decade before pursuing his passion for public radio in 2007.

By "long way," he means he's also been a writer, bicycle courier, commercial fisherman, bed-and-breakfast cook, carpenter, landscaper and stained glass salesman. He’s detailed animal enclosures to prevent jaguars from escaping the Miami Zoo. Once, while managing a construction site in Athens, Greece, he was given a noogie by an Albanian civil war refugee in his employ. “You do not tell those guys how to place stucco,” he said.

All of which has no doubt made him the story-teller he is today.  

Ways to Connect

A transport vehicle carries the new front end of the bearing block for Bertha. First though, the machine has to be dug out from beneath Pioneer Square.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

They were not reassuring words.

Engineers hired to rescue Bertha, the deep boring machine stalled under downtown Seattle, wrote to state officials: “If we continue the current ‘repair as we go’ method of excavation, we significantly increase the risk of a catastrophic failure.”

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It’s late afternoon at the Issaquah Highlands, where a thick fog has engulfed the park and ride here.

Buses pull up to drop off a dozen people at a time. They’re arriving at one of the most walkable suburbs in the region, with densely clustered housing and front porches instead of garage doors facing the street. 

A small gathering at Red Square to discuss the events that have unfolded in Paris.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Several dozen students and Francophiles gathered in Red Square on the University of Washington campus on Friday in light of the tragic events that unfolded this week in Paris.

They formed a loose circle and discussed freedom of expression, what they love about France and how they were handling the news that two gunman had entered the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine and killed 12 staffers. The gunmen died Friday after a standoff with police. 

Zachary Gian, an exchange student from France, said it has been hard to watch the news.

Matthew Rutledge via Flickr

David Starkey of Scotland traveled to Seattle this week for an astronomy convention, and he learned something that blew his mind. 

"If you’re a non-astronomer it won’t mean anything," he says, "but you can find mini-black holes inside the accretion disks of big black holes. And I didn’t know you could do that.

Justin Ingram ate two heaping bowls of cereal, a bowl of oatmeal, two pieces of toast with butter and a rare pint of ice cream for breakfast at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Ballard on Tuesday morning. Still, he says he's lost 50 pounds while homeless
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

A facility in Ballard where homeless men and women can wash their clothes and take a shower has received the city's blessing, but the process has been stalled by a legal complaint filed by concerned neighbors.

Final permits for the Urban Rest Stop can't be issued until it's resolved. The delay is felt hardest by those struggling to enter the job market and be a part of society. 

Cass Turnbull, open space advocate, says the 6th Avenue Pocket Park in Greenwood shows how a former substation can make a great park.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle City Light is selling off a bunch of obsolete substations. Some open space activists want to nab that land for parks or other open space, but it turns out it’s not so easy to transfer land from one department to another.

Amber Larkins and Terry Jaeger of the Pierce County Medical Examiner's office hold up vessels containing unclaimed cremated remains.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

When the nameless die, they often end up in a potter’s field, a common grave. In Pierce County, unclaimed remains or bodies get cremated and placed up on a shelf in the medical examiner’s office. 

But that shelf has gotten crowded lately. So medical examiner Thomas Clark decided to give those unclaimed ashes a respectable burial – at sea.

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