Jeannie Yandel | KUOW News and Information

Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Jeannie Yandel talks with Mary Ellen Stone about a new Seattle Police Department policy to conduct DNA testing on all sexual assault evidence kits. Stone is executive director of the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center. Yandel also talks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil about SPD's new policy.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Paul Throne of the Washington State Department of Health about why some groups of Washingtonians decline to vaccinate against measles and what that means for the rest of the state.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Washington political science professor Mark Smith about "dark money" and how that fits into campaign financing. 

A line of Car2Gos in the South Lake Union district of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Susan Shaheen, co-director of the Transportation Sustainability Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, about the expansion of car sharing services like Car2Go in Seattle. The City Council has voted to bump the number of permits for short term rental cars from 500 to 3,000. 

Elephants at Addo Elephant Park in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.
Flickr Photo/Clive Reid (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to University of Washington biology professor Samuel Wasser about how his lab uses elephant DNA to pinpoint where large ivory poaching operations happen in Africa. Representative Eric Pettigrew has sponsored a bill in the Washington state House of Representatives that would ban ivory in the state.

A health care worker gives some much needed maternal care to an infant whose mother died from Ebola.
Courtesy of Karin Huster

Most days, Seattle nurse Karin Huster woke up around 6 a.m. for a quick bucket shower and breakfast before walking over to the Ebola treatment unit in Port Loko, Sierra Leone.

Outside, ambulances would queue up at all times of the day, packed with as many as eight patients at all stages of illness.

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch makes a run against the Baltimore Ravens at CenturyLink Field in 2011.
Flickr Photo/JBLM PAO (CC0-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to John Vidale who explains how local seismologists are harnessing the power of Seahawks fans to test new earthquake sensor technology. Vidale is a professor of earth and space science at University of Washington and the director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, which allows you to track the shaking of CenturyLink Field during the Seahawks game.

A piece of the original Antikythera Mechanism. Divers found the first pieces off the coast of the Greek island Antikythera in 1901.
Wikimedia Commons

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Puget Sound professor James Evans about the Antikythera Mechanism, which is believed to be the world's first computer. Evans and a colleague recently found the mechanism may be as old as 205 BC, which is 50-100 years older than originally thought.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Danny Chapman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with John Marzluff, author of "Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods With Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, And Other Wildlife," about the crow invasion in Sunnyside, Washington.

Via Crosscut

Seattle writer Knute Berger was combing through old articles when he spotted an unusual character: “A woman, dressed as a man, riding a bike recklessly.”

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Jeannie Yandel talks with KUOW's Olympia corespondent, Austin Jenkins, about a few of the biggest stories of the year from the Washington State Legislature

Mural near the Fisherman's Cove Marina and Lummi Island Ferry on Lummi Nation.
KUOW Photo/Jeff Emtman

After a visit to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Nation in North Dakota, President Barack Obama announced an initiative to help Native American youth.

Obama's proposal aims to provide culturally appropriate education at tribal schools, access to mental health providers and peer counseling and better preparation for college and careers. KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel spoke with Gyasi Ross, a writer, attorney and member of the Blackfeet tribe. He lives on the Suquamish reservation north of Seattle.

“You can see it in Obama's face, you can hear it in the words that he speaks -- he actually has a passion for trying to do something proactively for Native people," Ross said. "I knew that it was coming from a good place.”

Jeannie Yandel talks with Marc Solomon, the national campaign director for Freedom To Marry and the author of the book "Winning Marriage," about Washington voters' legalizing gay marriage in November 2012.

Blood drive sticker from the Red Cross.
Flickr Photo/Maia C. (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Randall Russell, CEO of Lifelong, about the FDA's announcement that it will recommend the lifting of a ban on gay and bisexual men who want to donate blood. The decision will be put up for public comment in 2015.

A selection of Cuban cigars.
Flickr Photo/Alex Brown (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Joe Arundel, general manager of Rain City Cigar in Georgetown, about why he won't be stocking Cuban cigars anytime soon -- and why nobody else in the U.S. will be either. 

Couch Fest seeks to bring strangers together for a unique movie watching experience.
Flickr Photo/Mike Harber (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Couch Fest founder Craig Downing about why he thought a film festival where strangers get together in different houses to watch short films could help alleviate the "Seattle freeze."

A sign points towards an exhibit as part of a 2012 art walk on Capitol Hill, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Dave Lichterman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Matthew Richter, Seattle's cultural space liaison, about the recently approved program to create official arts districts around the city. 

Courtesy Shana Greene

Jeannie Yandel talks with Village Volunteers founder Shana Greene about creating biodegradable sanitary pads out of water hyacinth for women who don't have reliable access to menstrual supplies.

Can Microsoft Catch Up?

Nov 17, 2014
Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/6FfQtk

Jeannie Yandel talks with  Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Microsoft's fate in the sea of successful tech giants.

law court crime
Flickr Photo/Joe Gratz (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/bkUna

Jeannie Yandel talks with King County budget director Dwight Dively about proposed layoffs at the Department of Public Defense.

The Puget Sound VA has new initiatives focusing on accessibility and quailty of care for veterans.
Flickr Photo/cursedthing (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Pat Justis, rural health manager at the Washington State Department of Health, about the myriad of health issues facing rural areas.

Facebook and Apple made news with their decision to offer their employees up to $20,000 towards the costs of egg freezing and other reproductive technologies. Jeannie Yandel speaks with Brigid Schulte, reporter for the Washington Post and author of Overwhelmed: Work Love and Play When No One Has the Time, about other ways employers might help their employees attain work-life balance.

Woodland Park Zoo/Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren

The veterinarians at the Woodland Park Zoo had grown increasingly alarmed.

Vip – known also as The Big Guy or Vippers – was an alpha male gorilla with a sinus infection. The vets had given him antibiotics for months, but he remained congested.

Jeannie Yandel talks with writer and journalist Andrew Solomon about what he learned from the parents of the shooters at Sandy Hook and Columbine and whether "bad parenting" is to blame. 

Courtesy of Litsa Dremousis

TJ Langley wished that he had been born a century prior, even if REI didn't exist back then.

Langley loved the outdoors and riding his bike around Seattle, but at his core, Langley was a climber. Five years ago, he died on a trip in the North Cascades.

Jason Fox shaves the Seahawks logo into a loyal 12's hair.
KUOw Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with barber Jason Fox about shaving the Seattle Seahawk into the hair of Seahawks fans outside CenturyLink Field before Seahawks home games. 

Facebook Photo/Save Bristol Bay

Jeannie Yandel talks to Alexandra Gutierrez, state government reporter for Alaska Public Radio, about some of the measures that passed in Alaska after the 2014 mid-term election.

Arm wrestler Stephanie Browner and KUOW's Jeannie Yandel show off their biceps at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Jeannie Yandel talks with Stephanie Browning of Olympia's Collective of Lady Arm Wrestlers, a group that arm wrestles to raise funds for local charities. 

Jeannie Yandel talks with Natalie Snyder, who was wounded in the 1996 shooting at Frontier Middle School in Moses Lake, Wash., about the long process of healing after a trauma.

Flickr Photo/Jess Judge (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dan Pashman, creator and host of the podcast The Sporkful, about his new book: "Eat More Better: How To Make Every Bite More Delicious."

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