Jeannie Yandel | KUOW News and Information

Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Homeless Camp Evictions On The Rise In Seattle

Dec 21, 2015
A Seattle homeless camp's eviction notice, taken in January 2015.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Jeannie Yandel talks to Jason Johnson, deputy director of Seattle's Department of Human Services, about the rise in city 'clean ups' of unauthorized homeless tent encampments on public lands.

Scott Bonjukian

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Scott Bonjukian about his proposal before the Seattle City Council to build a lid over the downtown Interstate 5 corridor to create a new central park for the city.

Joby Shimomura's stained glass work at Alki Beach in West Seattle.
Courtesy of Joby Shimomura

Joby Shimomura says working for Gov. Jay Inslee “is like working for the mob.”

“You never leave the family,” said Shimomura, who recently stepped down as Inslee’s chief of staff after a 20-year career in politics. “They totally suck you back in.”

Josephine Howell of Seattle band Radio Raheem .
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Josephine Howell used to find it too painful to talk to her eldest son.

Charles is in prison on the East Coast, serving to two life sentences for second-degree murder. He was convicted at the age of 17 and has been locked up since 1999.

Howell fronts Seattle band Radio Raheem. They’ve written a new song about her son called, “Dear Charles.”

Howell told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel that the song is a way that she attempts to express depths of her feeling in grappling with Charles’ situation.

Marijuana plants growing at Seattle's first legal pot farm, Sea of Green.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Rick Steves doesn’t think Big Marijuana should control your pot. That’s one reason people in Washington state should be able to grow their own weed, Steves told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel.

KEXP DJ John Richards began the 'Mom Show' a decade ago after his mother died of cancer.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

When KEXP DJ John Richards lost his mom to lung cancer, he went on the air, played songs that he played at her funeral and talked about what he was going through.

A decade later, Richards still does that on the anniversary of his mom's death. But now listeners get involved too.

Rosa Parks on a Montgomery bus on December 21, 1956, the day Montgomery's public transportation system was legally integrated.
Wikipedia Photo

Bill Radke talks to Carla Saulter, writer of the blog Bus Chick, about how Rosa Parks' legacy has impacted her life. 

T-Mobile employees protest outside the company's headquarters in Bellevue.
Courtesy of Communication Workers of America

Jeannie Yandel speaks to Angela Agganis about her lawsuit against T-Mobile. She says the company forced her to sign a nondisclosure agreement after she reported being sexually harassed by her supervisor.  

'Sesame Street' has included children and a new character with autism.
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dr. Wendy Stone is a professor of psychology and director of the READi lab at the University of Washington. Dr. Stone was a consultant for Sesame Street as they created their first character with autism, Julia. Julia is also a character in their digital storybook, "We're Amazing, 1,2,3!"  

Sesame seared Ahi tuna at Elliot's in Seattle. This was taken in 2011, how has the city's food evolved?
Flickr Photo/Mubnii M. (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1kdJiMj

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle restaurateur Rachel Yang about how the tech industry and increased diversity are changing the cuisine of the city.  

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Avina Gutierrez, one of the first two Latinos elected to the Yakima City Council. The historic election comes after the ACLU sued the city for disenfranchising Hispanic voters. 

birds
Flickr Photo/disordered eyes gave me this photographs (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1H4R2tQ

Sometimes, birds get divorced.

“If you've had poor reproductive success with a particular mate, maybe it's better for both members of that pair to seek new mates or new territories with new mates,” said John Marzluff, a professor of forest sciences at the University of Washington. He’s the author of “Welcome to Subirdia.”

Brown marmorated stink bug
Wikipedia Photo/Yerpo (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iezQGF

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Washington State University entomologist Elizabeth Beers about a newly discovered parasitic wasp that is preying on an invasive stinkbug. 

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Jeannie Yandel sits down with security professional Scott McArthur to discuss the rise of threat assessment teams across the county that work to intervene and prevent violent incidents like mass shootings. McArthur is president of the Northwest chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals. 

Garfield High School in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1GgN2Xe

Jeannie Yandel talks to KUOW education reporter Ann Dornfeld about why the Seattle Public School District is considering changes to when the school day starts for the high schools.

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