Jeannie Yandel | KUOW News and Information

Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Jeannie Yandel speaks with New York Times reporter Kirk Johnson about a new program bringing dental therapists to the Swinomish reservation in Washington. Dental therapists are currently banned from operating in Washington state. 

Forterra/Florangela Davila

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Gene Duvernoy, president and CEO of Forterra, and Estela Ortega, executive director of El Centro de la Raza, about why their organizations are teaming up to create affordable housing and what building apartments has to do with saving the environment.

Ron Thompson, whose home was destroyed in the Oso, Washington, slide, had a full workshop. He continues to carve signs, including these at his new home behind the Oso fire station.
KCTS Photo/Aileen Imperial

Jeannie Yandel speaks with president of the Darrington Historical Society, Scott Morris, who has partnered with a group of students from University of Washington's Master of Library and Information Science program to collect and preserve historical documents and histories from the Oso landslide. 

Soldiers place their hats on rack just inside the mess hall doors before eating breakfast in the controlled monitoring area at JBLM.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Sebastian Junger, author of the new book "TRIBE: On Homecoming and Belonging," about why soldiers long for war and what civilians are missing out on.

Lisa Hallett holding a photo of her husband John
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Mile one: “Oh my God, the babies didn’t stop crying for the last hour and a half.”

Mile two: “I need to buy diapers, what am I going to make for dinner, there’s baby food stuck in the carpet, what am I going to do?”

Mile three and four: “All of a sudden the business and the high energy of that day to day life with young children, it starts to quiet down.”

Mile five: “It’s just quiet, there’s nothing.”

Mile six: “Oh shit, my husband died.”

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle writer Lindy West about her new book, "Shrill: Notes From A Loud Woman." In it West talks about how she found her voice, reclaimed the word "fat" and began fighting misogyny on the internet. 

Lashauwn Beyond, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, a finalist in RuPaul's Drag Race and the face of the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau LGBT campaign, marches in the New York Gay Pride Parade in 2014.
Invision for Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau via AP/Diane Bondareff

Seven years ago, Seattle TV writer Melanie McFarland was depressed.

“It was like being under water,” McFarland said. “Or having an alien be inside my skull and pilot the meat suit.”

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why he disagrees with a U.S. Chamber of Commerce study that ranks Seattle 11 out of 25 American cities in terms of "readiness to capitalize on the inevitable shift to a digital economy."

Woodie Guthrie, 1943
Public Domain

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Greg Vandy about his new book, "26 Songs in 30 Days: Woody Guthrie's Columbia River Songs and the Planned Promise Land in the Pacific Northwest." 

Rebecca Benson, a public health nurse in King County, holds up a box now being given to parents for their babies to sleep in. Benson, who shared a bed with her own babies, now believes that giving babies their own space to sleep is preferable.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

When infants die in King County, the medical examiner investigates.

One hundred babies were found to have died of SUID – sudden unexpected infant death – between 2009 and 2015, according to data obtained by KUOW.


Found photo of an Indiana family.
Flickr Photo/Brent (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8mjHW2

Jeannie Yandel talks with author Stephanie Coontz about her updated and revised book, "The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap." Coontz teaches history and family studies at Evergreen State College in Olympia.

Aji Piper (top row, middle) Adonis Piper (second row, right) and attorney Andrea Rodgers (top row, right) at King County Superior Court, outside the courtroom where they won their case.
Courtesy of Our Children's Trust

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Aji and Adonis Piper, two of eight youth plaintiffs in the case, Zoe and Stella Foster vs. Washington Department of Ecology, and  their attorney Andrea Rodgers.

The kids took the Department of Ecology to court over inaction on curbing carbon emissions in the state. 

Kahlil Joseph. Streetlight, 2014. Motion picture still.
Courtesy Frye Art Museum

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Jen Graves, visual arts writer for The Stranger, about the Frye Art Museum's current exhibition "Young Blood."

The show features the art of two local brothers, Kahlil Joseph and Noah Davis, who made big names for themselves in film and painting, respectively.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker about what happens to plans for a new sports arena in Sodo after the Seattle City Council said no to selling the developer a key public right-of-way.

Washington State University cheer squad advice graphic
Facebook Photo/Washington State University Cheer

The University of Washington cheerleading team took some flak for an image they posted on Facebook showing the dos and don’ts for the right tryout look: athletic physique, false lashes, but not too much makeup.

The graphic was intended to give advice to aspiring cheerleaders, but others called the image offensive, exclusionary and ignorant.

A frequent sight in our newsroom: Business reporter Carolyn Adolph arguing with Siri, the iPhone personal assistant.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Jeannie Yandel talks with Geekwire's Monica Nickelsburg about why virtual assistants like Siri typically have female sounding voices.

Chipping paint is a lead poisoning danger to kids.
Flickr Photo/Nancy Waldman (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/2Unkx2

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle Times health reporter JoNel Aleccia about lead risks in Washington state. Children in the state have low risks of lead poisoning, but health officials say the biggest lead risks are not in the water; they exist in lead paint in old houses and other environments like some construction sites. 

Jeannie Yandel talks to Mukilteo's Mayor Jennifer Gregerson about the reaction to a proposal to build a mosque in the city. 

What Song Changed Your Life?

Apr 18, 2016
Bob Boilen, Host of NPR's 'All Songs Considered'
Courtesy of NPR/Maggie Starbard

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Bob Boilen, host and creator of NPR's All Songs Considered, about his new book, "Your Song Changed My Life."

Officials confirmed this brown bat found in King County, Washington, contracted white-nose-syndrome.
Courtesy of Progressive Animal Welfare Society

Jeannie Yandel talks with Earthfix reporter Jes Burns about a deadly fungus called white nose syndrome that's killed millions of bats on the East coast. In March, a single bat with white nose syndrome was discovered in Washington state. Burns talks about what the spread of this syndrome could do to the state's ecosystem and agriculture. 

File photo of tech computer
Flickr Photo/World Bank Photo Collection (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eUtLoM

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Natasha Lamb, director of equity research and shareholder engagement for Arjuna Capital, about activist investing and the firm's role in pressuring tech companies to close the gender pay gap.   

UW junior #13 Katie Collier, center, was diagnosed and treated for leukemia in 2011 and is now cancer free.
UW Husky Photo

Jeannie Yandel talks with former UW basketball player Elise Woodward about the women's team reaching the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Basketball Tournament. Woodward is a broadcaster with the Washington IMG Sports Network and the Pac-12 Network.

Twitter

Seattleite Amelia Bonow is not the type to whisper about anything. But her abortion was something she kept to herself – until a few days ago.

Kim and Brad Lancaster and their dog, Sofie.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Brad Lancaster is an attorney. His wife Kim is a paralegal. They live in a small 770-square-foot house with their dog Sofie in Shoreline, Washington. 

When KUOW visited recently, 16 homeless people had also set up their tents in the backyard. That makes 18 people sharing one bathroom, one small kitchen and one washer/dryer.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the affordable housing levy and why he believes it is an important for voters to pass. For the last five years, Seattle voters have taxed homeowners to pay for affordable housing. Murray wants to effectively double the amount of money homeowners pay. 

A homeless camp beneath an Interstate 5 off-ramp in Seattle's SODO district.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about how he'd like to deal with the homelessness problem in the Jungle -- a notorious encampment along a green belt near I-5 -- and throughout the city. 

Diane Rehm in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel talks with longtime show host Diane Rehm about having to learn who she is without her husband, John Rehm. After 54 years of marriage, John Rehm chose to end his own life after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. Diane Rehm writes about how his illness and death changed her in her book, "On My Own." 

Bill Radke talks with Jade Gee, a trans woman who invited anybody to come have coffee with "a real, live trans person" in Tacoma over the weekend and ask questions about being transgender.

More Hall Annex on UW campus. The building is an example of brutalism architecture.
Courtesy of Washington Trust for Historic Preservation/Jennifer Mortensen

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Chris Moore from the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation about the recent decision by the University of Washington's Board of Regents to replace More Hall Annex, a historic nuclear reactor on campus, with a new computer science building.

Moore is involved with an effort to add More Hall to Seattle's list of historic places, which could save it from demolition. The University of Washington has sued the city to stop that effort. A ruling is expected April 1.

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dona Ponepinto, president and CEO of United Way of Pierce County about a new study commissioned by United Way that found one in three Northwest households are living just above or below the poverty line. 

Pages