Jeannie Yandel

Producer, KUOW Presents

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways To Connect

File photo. apartment housing apt door
Flickr Photo/Matthew Piatt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Sahra Muhumed, who made it onto the wait list for King County Housing Authority's Section 8 Program. When the wait list opened earlier this year 22,5000 people applied for only 2,500 spots. Sahra made the cut but she'll have to wait for years before she gets assistance. 

Mount Rainier seen from the town of Orting, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Neil Hodges (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Washington Post reporter Eli Saslow about his coverage of the small town of Orting, Washington and what happened after they hired their first black police officer. Hint: it went terribly.

Editor's note: This story contains some offensive language.

Some of the microaggressions noted by KUOW listeners.
KUOW Illustration

When Dr. Derald Wing Sue gives presentations around the country, people often compliment him on his good English speaking.

His response? “Thank you. I hope so, I was born here.”

The University of Washington's Intellectual House.
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks with Ross Braine, the University of Washington's tribal liaison, about his big dreams for the University's brand new Intellectual House, a space for Native Americans on campus.

Washington King County ballot election
Flickr Photo/Brian Daniel Eisenberg (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Everett Herald columnist Jerry Cornfield about the likely cancelation of the 2016 presidential primaries in Washington. 

The only surviving photo of the Cambodian genocide from Charles Som Nguyen's family. Pictured are his aunt and uncle.
Courtesy of Charles Som Nguyen

When Charles Som Nguyen was a kid in Oregon, his mom would occasionally tell stories over dinner about her home country of Cambodia.  More often than not, she wouldn’t recount happy memories.

Instead, she would tell stories about living in labor camps, of running away while bodies fell and bullets whizzed past her ears, of finding her own sister dead.

Katherine Switz, founder of the Stability Network.
Courtesy of Katherine Switz

When a GermanWings passenger jet slammed into the French Alps last month, killing all aboard, attention focused on the co-pilot’s treatment for severe depression – and how he hid his illness.

An estimated 58 percent of Americans don’t want people with mental health issues in their workplace, even though a vast majority of people with such illnesses can work just fine.

Reinier Valdes, owner of the dance studio La Clave Cubana.
Courtesy of Reinier Valdes

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Reinier Valdes, owner of the dance studio La Clave Cubana, about his effort to bring Cuban dance to Seattle.

Ralph Munro, Washington's former secretary of state, blows bubbles with Vietnamese refugees. Gov. Dan Evans asked Munro to find out more about the refugees, so he went to Camp Pendleton in California in 1975.
Courtesy of Ralph Munro

Dan Evans was furious.

So furious he cursed (and he was not someone who swore).

It was 1975 and the Washington state governor had picked up the morning paper and read that Gov. Jerry Brown of California had said Vietnamese refugees wouldn’t be welcome in his state.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Kim Ward, the dean of communication and transitional studies at Tacoma Community College, about High School 21+, the state's new GED alternative program.

Lisa Pauley was a volunteer at an Adventist hospital in Hong Kong. Joyce Wertz Harrington, a fellow nurse, photographed their 30-hour journey.
Courtesy of Joyce Wertz Harrington

Jeannie Yandel talked with historian Jeremi Suri about Operation Babylift, the U.S. government's program to airlift as many South Vietnamese babies -- orphans in addition to other babies -- out of South Vietnam as possible before the North Vietnamese troops arrived. 

Cat and dog
Flickr Photo/Asaf Antman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Rupert Giles, executive director of the Phew Research Center, about how Western Washington residents responded to a central question of American life: dogs vs. cats. 

File photo of a gun show.
Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with the founder and CEO of the QPR Institute, Paul Quinnett, about the role of guns in rising suicide rates in rural areas. 

Goats graze near Interstate 5 in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/cleverclevergirl (CC-BY-NC-ND)

When Amazon launched its Amazon Home Services this week, the stars of the new initiative were …

Goats.

Seattle goats, specifically, ready to trim back your pesky shrubbery.

The Companion Athletics program aims to get children off the streets.
Courtesy Companion Athletics

KUOW's Jeannie Yandel talks to Ayanle Ismail, co-founder and president of Companion Athletics, about how the weekend youth mentorship program brings together East African kids from around the South Puget Sound to play basketball and learn. 

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