Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Officials confirmed this brown bat found in King County, Washington, contracted white-nose-syndrome.
Courtesy of Progressive Animal Welfare Society

Jeannie Yandel talks with Earthfix reporter Jes Burns about a deadly fungus called white nose syndrome that's killed millions of bats on the East coast. In March, a single bat with white nose syndrome was discovered in Washington state. Burns talks about what the spread of this syndrome could do to the state's ecosystem and agriculture. 

File photo of tech computer
Flickr Photo/World Bank Photo Collection (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eUtLoM

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Natasha Lamb, director of equity research and shareholder engagement for Arjuna Capital, about activist investing and the firm's role in pressuring tech companies to close the gender pay gap.   

UW junior #13 Katie Collier, center, was diagnosed and treated for leukemia in 2011 and is now cancer free.
UW Husky Photo

Jeannie Yandel talks with former UW basketball player Elise Woodward about the women's team reaching the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Basketball Tournament. Woodward is a broadcaster with the Washington IMG Sports Network and the Pac-12 Network.

Twitter

Seattleite Amelia Bonow is not the type to whisper about anything. But her abortion was something she kept to herself – until a few days ago.

Kim and Brad Lancaster and their dog, Sofie.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Brad Lancaster is an attorney. His wife Kim is a paralegal. They live in a small 770-square-foot house with their dog Sofie in Shoreline, Washington. 

When KUOW visited recently, 16 homeless people had also set up their tents in the backyard. That makes 18 people sharing one bathroom, one small kitchen and one washer/dryer.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the affordable housing levy and why he believes it is an important for voters to pass. For the last five years, Seattle voters have taxed homeowners to pay for affordable housing. Murray wants to effectively double the amount of money homeowners pay. 

A homeless camp beneath an Interstate 5 off-ramp in Seattle's SODO district.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about how he'd like to deal with the homelessness problem in the Jungle -- a notorious encampment along a green belt near I-5 -- and throughout the city. 

Diane Rehm in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel talks with longtime show host Diane Rehm about having to learn who she is without her husband, John Rehm. After 54 years of marriage, John Rehm chose to end his own life after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. Diane Rehm writes about how his illness and death changed her in her book, "On My Own." 

Bill Radke talks with Jade Gee, a trans woman who invited anybody to come have coffee with "a real, live trans person" in Tacoma over the weekend and ask questions about being transgender.

More Hall Annex on UW campus. The building is an example of brutalism architecture.
Courtesy of Washington Trust for Historic Preservation/Jennifer Mortensen

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Chris Moore from the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation about the recent decision by the University of Washington's Board of Regents to replace More Hall Annex, a historic nuclear reactor on campus, with a new computer science building.

Moore is involved with an effort to add More Hall to Seattle's list of historic places, which could save it from demolition. The University of Washington has sued the city to stop that effort. A ruling is expected April 1.

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dona Ponepinto, president and CEO of United Way of Pierce County about a new study commissioned by United Way that found one in three Northwest households are living just above or below the poverty line. 

Yakima City Council (clockwise from top left): Mayor Avina Gutierrez, Holly Cousens, Carmen Mendez, Dulce Gutierrez, Maureen Adkison, Bill Lover, and Kathy Coffey.
Yakima City Council

Jeannie Yandel speaks with newly appointed Yakima City Mayor Avina Gutierrez about the City Council supporting the Voting Rights Act in Olympia.

Danni Askini, the executive director of the Gender Justice League.
Courtesy of Danielle Askini

Rep. Graham Hunt of Orting doesn’t want to see a naked lady in the locker room.

“If I'm in the restroom, or I'm in the locker room, and I'm changing, and I turn around and there's a woman standing there completely naked, and she has different parts than I do – how is that OK?” he told KUOW’s Bill Radke.

In this photo taken Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, Sgt. Rick Nelson works on locating information on a hard drive with Det. Caitlin Rebe at the Internet Crimes Against Children unit in Manchester, N.H.
AP Photo/Jim Cole

17,000.

That’s the number of seats in the Key Arena – and the number of people believed to be trading child porn right now in Washington state.

Prosecutors say it’s so tough to keep up with technology – and then build successful cases – that they’re always playing defense.

Shilo Murphy at the People's Harm Reduction Alliance in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Shilo Murphy, executive director of the People's Harm Reduction Alliance, about his plan to start a safe consumption site for drug users in Seattle.  

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