Jeannie Yandel


Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways To Connect

Smoking marijuana joint
Flickr Photo/ashton (CC BY)/

Jeannie Yandel talks to Sarah Mirk, online editor for Bitch Media, about Oregon's recreational marijuana law and why it allows Oregonians with marijuana convictions on their record to wipe the slate clean.

Flag of Tibet.
Flickr Photo/Ed Uthman (CC BY SA)/

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Jampa Jorkhang, incoming president of the Tibetan Association of Washington, to discuss why the Tibetan community is protesting Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit.

Chinese President Xi Jinping visits Bali, Indonesia for the 2013  Applied Power Electronics Conference.
Flickr Photo/APEC 2013 (CC BY 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Todd Bishop, co-founder and editor of technology news site GeekWire, about why Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to Seattle is putting U.S. tech leaders on the spot. Bishop wrote a FAQ on President Xi's visit for GeekWire.

Jeannie Yandel talks to Luke Timmerman of the Timmerman Report about Chris Rivera's tenure as President of the Washington Biotechnology And Biomedical Association. 

Jeannie Yandel talks with Crosscut's Knute Berger about his article on Beriah Brown, a mover and shaker in early Seattle who also had a long body of work underlining his pro-slavery, white supremacist beliefs. 

Chef Rachel Yang holds an escarole -- 'Bigger than my head!' -- from the Wallinford Farmers Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with chef and Seattle restaurant owner Rachel Yang about picking the freshest berries, stone fruit, and vegetables for pickles at the Wallingford Farmers' Market.  

Male human head louse
Flickr Photo/Gilles San Martin (CC BY SA 2.0)

When kids in Seattle eventually go to school after the strike, they could find an unfriendly welcoming party: tougher lice.

Washington is among at least 25 states where lice have become highly resistant to conventional treatments, according to a recent study.

The good news: Lice aren’t really much of a health problem and schools are being urged not to ban kids from class just because of a stray nit (the louse’s egg). But there’s still that feeling you get when you talk about them …

The Gates Foundation's headquarters near Seattle Center.
Flickr Photo/ganphotography (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks to former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn about why he is calling on the Gates Foundation to divest from fossil fuel companies. 

Two cookie varieties produced by Jody Hall's new venture, The Goodship Company.
Facebook Photo/The Goodship Company

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Cupcake Royale founder Jody Hall to talk about her new venture, The Goodship Company, which produces edible marijuana products. Hall explains why she got into the pot industry and how she hopes to change the culture of marijuana. 

Holly Smith, Holly's son Oliver, and farmer Bill Davidson at the Ballard Farmers' Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with Cafe Juanita chef Holly Smith about shopping for fresh nectarines at the Ballard Farmers Market. 

Mount Baker glacier as seen from a helicopter in 2009.
Flickr Photo/judy_and_ed (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton about her story on the alarming melting of Northwest glaciers due to hot weather and low snowpack. Scientists say glaciers across the North Cascades could shrink by as much as 10 percent this year.

Mosquito fleet steamers are seen at Houghton, Wash., in 1945.
Courtesy of MOHAI

Jeannie Yandel speaks to Leonard Garfield, director of the Museum of History and Industry, about a time when Seattleites got around on a "swarm of little steamers" known as the Mosquito Fleet.

A Lyft for-hire car rolls down a street in San Francisco.
Flickr Photo/urbanists (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel speaks with financial journalist Felix Salmon about a bill headed to the Seattle City Council that would allow for-hire drivers to unionize. 

Georgie, age 35, wearing her favorite Christmas earrings.
Courtesy Georgie Bright Kunkel

When World War II came, millions of women joined the fight – not on the front lines but doing the vital work of building weapons to defeat the Axis powers. Georgie Bright Kunkel was one of them.

“It was a life-changing event,” she told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel about the experiences that American women had by the time the war formally ended Sept. 2, 1945.

On Memorial Day, May 30, 1948, a dike at Vanport, Ore., broke and the flood engulfed the nearby Portland Air National Guard Base.
Oregon Air National Guard

Jeannie Yandel talks to Shawn Daley, chief innovation officer and assistant professor of education at Concordia University in Oregon, about the lost town of Vanport, Oregon.