Jeannie Yandel | KUOW News and Information

Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

 Bill Radke talks with Seattle-based author Lindy West about why she still believes Twitter can be a great democratizing force, even while she's decided not to be part of the social media platform anymore.

KUOW general manager Caryn Mathes
KUOW Photo

Journalism is so white.

That’s a criticism of newsrooms in America, and the numbers show that it’s true: In radio, just 9.4 percent of journalists are people of color.

Dixy Lee Ray, Washington state's first female governor. She was a Democrat who wore knee-high white socks and men's shirts and who refused to pull punches.
Washington State Archives/Harold (Scotty) Sapiro

Dixy Lee Ray wore white knee-high socks and men's shirts.

And when she ran for governor of Washington state, her motto was "Little lady takes on big boys."

She was blunt and brash, an outsider who didn't play well with others, but there was never any doubt where she stood. Seattle historian Knute Berger spoke with KUOW's Bill Radke  that Dixy Lee Ray was a little like President-elect Donald Trump.

Blues singer Courtney Weaver performs in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kenneth Fiaui had always been jealous of his girlfriend. He was even jealous of her 4-month-old cat.

On the night he shot her, Courtney Weaver was preparing to go out with some friends for the evening. Fiaui didn’t want her to go.

The bag Rose, a slave and mother, gave to her 9-year-old daughter the day she was sold away. They never saw each other again.
Courtesy of Middleton Place Foundation

For about $300, a 9-year-old girl named Ashley was sold as a slave.

Her mother, Rose, remained a house slave at a mansion in South Carolina.


Nooksack tribal police stand outside the courthouse during a disenrollment hearing in 2013.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

"Brother, brother, I need your help." 

That was the first thing Gabe Galanda heard when he picked up his phone four years ago. The women on the other end was a member of the Nooksack 306, a group the Nooksack Tribe has been working to disenroll.

Jeannie Yandel talks to KUOW's Amanda Wilde about three local musicians from the 20th century who changed their industry through technology and innovation. 

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle P-I reporter Levi Pulkkinen about his story that looked into the treatment of mentally ill inmates in Washington state jails.  

Shell Oil's Polar Pioneer sits at anchor aboard the Blue Marlin in Port Angeles.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a move by President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to make oil and gas development off limits in Arctic waters.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Jessica Bennett, author of "Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual For A Sexist Workplace," about dealing with sexism at work, and why men need to be members of the Feminist Fight Club, too. 

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Kirby Wilbur and John Nichols about whether or not the Electoral College should be abolished. Wilbur is the former chair of the Washington state Republican party and a host on KVI talk radio. Nichols is the national affairs correspondent for The Nation. 

Suzanne Gwynn
YouTube

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Suzanne Gwynn about her idea to create the Ladybug House. Gwynn has been a nurse for 33 years, working mostly with children here in Seattle. She says hospitals do a great job at providing medicine and treatment. But for terminally ill kids, there comes a time when medicine can no longer help. And for a long time, Gwynn had an idea to make end of life care for kids better: a hospice just for them and their families.

Musician Adra Boo is sticking it out in Seattle, but Jennifer Peterson has decided to leave the city for Mexico.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Jennifer Peterson and Adra Boo, two women of color, about Peterson's decision to leave Seattle (and the United States) and Boo's decision to stay. 

Patricia Murphy speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist John Talton about how President-elect Donald Trump's economic polices will affect the Puget Sound region. 

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel talks to Xochitl Maykovich, an organizer with the Washington Community Action Network, and Brian Robinson, a Seattle landlord who's on the board of directors at the Rental Housing Association, about the pros and cons of the Seattle City Council legislation that would put a cap on move-in fees. 

Dana and Dave Verellen fled Seattle for Tacoma.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Bill Radke talks to Dave and Dana Verellen, owners of Zodiac Supper Club in Tacoma, about why they decided to move from Seattle. 

Cheryl Paysen looks at a screen displaying election results during the Washington State Republicans watch party Tuesday in Bellevue.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

It’s being called the most stunning victory in modern American history.

In January Donald J. Trump will take office as president of the United States. 

We’ve heard plenty from the politicians and the pundits. Now what do you have to say?

A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, N.D.
AP Photo/James MacPherson

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes to talk about the latest in the standoff over the construction of a proposed oil pipeline in North Dakota. 

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Microsoft and Apple's recent back-to-back hardware release events and why some tech watchers were surprised to discover they liked Microsoft's products better.

Mark Frost is the co-creator of 'Twin Peaks' filmed in North Bend, Washington.
Courtesy photos

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Mark Frost, co-creator of the 90s television show Twin Peaks, about his new book "The Secret History of Twin Peaks" and the upcoming revival of the show on Showtime next year. Frost will be holding an event at the Elliot Bay Book Company on October 29.

Amy Pittman received a box with sample formula from a company that got her information from a pregnancy app. Pittman had already miscarried when the box arrived.
Courtesy of Amy Pittman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Amy Pittman about her miscarriage and how the internet missed one of the biggest moments in her life. Pittman wrote an essay for the New York Times' Modern Love column about her experience. She tells Yandel what reaction she's received and how she thinks differently about big data. 

Gayle Nowicki of Gargoyles Statuary says growth is coming, so why fight it? She just hopes there will be a place in the future U-District for small, funky businesses like hers
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's plan to allow taller buildings in areas of the University District. 

The tent city where Jungle residents are being encouraged to move.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Kate Walters about the way unauthorized homeless camps around Seattle are being cleared out. While a lot of care is being taken to provide outreach to residents of the encampment under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle, outreach and services have not been uniformly made available during sweeps of other homeless camps. 

Simone Biles, a 4'8" package of muscle, performs at an Olympic exhibition gala after having won four gold medals and one bronze in the 2016 Games. What she is wearing is not relevant.
AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky

It's heartbreaking to Lindy West that young women work hard, become the best in the world at a difficult sport, and their moment of triumph turns into: "Man's sex companion does something, I guess." 

West laughed as she said this. But it's not really a joke. In fact, she's incensed by the way female Olympians have been talked about during the Rio Olympics. 

Bill Radke talks with KUOW reporter Paige Browning about a recent hearing to determine whether the Seattle Police Department is making progress in its federally-mandated reform efforts and the timeline for next steps. 

Pastor Drew Yoos is tired of white Christian congregations perpetuating systemic racism.
Flickr Photo/Mars Hill Church (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Drew Yoos is tired of hearing this:

“We’re all a gift from god.”
“Skin color doesn’t matter.”
“Diversity is a gift.”

He’s a pastor in the Bothell-Mill Creek area who believes that many white Christian churches are complicit in perpetuating racism.


Independent radio producer Brie Ripley.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Bill Radke asks independent radio producer and millennial Brie Ripley for help deciphering a slang-heavy invite from a Microsoft recruiter calling interns 'bae" for an event involving 'hella noms' and 'getting lit on a Monday night'. 

Author Peggy Orenstein
Courtesy Photo/Michael Todd

Girls want to be hot.

They want to look good – not because they want to feel good, but because they’re thinking about how others are thinking about them.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with writer Peggy Orenstein about her new book, "Girls and Sex: Navigating The Complicated New Landscape." Orenstein talked with 70 high-school and college-aged girls while researching the book and says she was shocked to hear what she called "garden-variety stories about coercion" from nearly all the girls.   

Baby gorilla Yola and mother Nadiri at the Woodland Park Zoo.
Courtesy of Woodland Park Zoo/Jeremy Dwyer

Last November, Woodland Park Zoo was excited to announce the birth of gorilla Yola.

The birth was natural, as zookeepers had hoped – they didn’t intervene. But then Nadiri walked away from her baby.


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