Jeannie Yandel

Producer, KUOW Presents

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways To Connect

Scandal hit the AFC title game when it was discovered that the New England Patriots used underinflated footballs.
Flickr Photo/frankieleon (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to David Callahan, author of "The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong To Get Ahead,"  about why we cheat and why there is so much cheating in professional sports.

KUOW's David Hyde caught this little beauty while jigging in Puget Sound.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Jeannie Yandel talks with Elaina Jorgensen, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's cephalopod expert, about squidding as a new hobby and what we know about the squid in Puget Sound. 

Ivy Huang and Terry Weng host a show on a recent
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

When Yunfei Zhao first arrived at the University of Washington, he felt like he was mostly prepared.

“I learned how to check out a book in the library in my English class back in China,” he said. “I learned how to greet people; I learned how to find my way someplace.”

Then he got hungry.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Mary Ellen Stone about a new Seattle Police Department policy to conduct DNA testing on all sexual assault evidence kits. Stone is executive director of the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center. Yandel also talks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil about SPD's new policy.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Paul Throne of the Washington State Department of Health about why some groups of Washingtonians decline to vaccinate against measles and what that means for the rest of the state.

Washington State Legislature in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Washington political science professor Mark Smith about "dark money" and how that fits into campaign financing. 

A line of Car2Gos in the South Lake Union district of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Susan Shaheen, co-director of the Transportation Sustainability Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, about the expansion of car sharing services like Car2Go in Seattle. The City Council has voted to bump the number of permits for short term rental cars from 500 to 3,000. 

Elephants at Addo Elephant Park in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.
Flickr Photo/Clive Reid (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to University of Washington biology professor Samuel Wasser about how his lab uses elephant DNA to pinpoint where large ivory poaching operations happen in Africa. Representative Eric Pettigrew has sponsored a bill in the Washington state House of Representatives that would ban ivory in the state.

A health care worker gives some much needed maternal care to an infant whose mother died from Ebola.
Courtesy of Karin Huster

Most days, Seattle nurse Karin Huster woke up around 6 a.m. for a quick bucket shower and breakfast before walking over to the Ebola treatment unit in Port Loko, Sierra Leone.

Outside, ambulances would queue up at all times of the day, packed with as many as eight patients at all stages of illness.

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch makes a run against the Baltimore Ravens at CenturyLink Field in 2011.
Flickr Photo/JBLM PAO (CC0-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to John Vidale who explains how local seismologists are harnessing the power of Seahawks fans to test new earthquake sensor technology. Vidale is a professor of earth and space science at University of Washington and the director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, which allows you to track the shaking of CenturyLink Field during the Seahawks game.

A piece of the original Antikythera Mechanism. Divers found the first pieces off the coast of the Greek island Antikythera in 1901.
Wikimedia Commons

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Puget Sound professor James Evans about the Antikythera Mechanism, which is believed to be the world's first computer. Evans and a colleague recently found the mechanism may be as old as 205 BC, which is 50-100 years older than originally thought.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Danny Chapman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with John Marzluff, author of "Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods With Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, And Other Wildlife," about the crow invasion in Sunnyside, Washington.

Via Crosscut

Seattle writer Knute Berger was combing through old articles when he spotted an unusual character: “A woman, dressed as a man, riding a bike recklessly.”

Washington State Legislature in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with KUOW's Olympia corespondent, Austin Jenkins, about a few of the biggest stories of the year from the Washington State Legislature

Mural near the Fisherman's Cove Marina and Lummi Island Ferry on Lummi Nation.
KUOW Photo/Jeff Emtman

After a visit to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Nation in North Dakota, President Barack Obama announced an initiative to help Native American youth.

Obama's proposal aims to provide culturally appropriate education at tribal schools, access to mental health providers and peer counseling and better preparation for college and careers. KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel spoke with Gyasi Ross, a writer, attorney and member of the Blackfeet tribe. He lives on the Suquamish reservation north of Seattle.

“You can see it in Obama's face, you can hear it in the words that he speaks -- he actually has a passion for trying to do something proactively for Native people," Ross said. "I knew that it was coming from a good place.”

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