Jeannie Yandel


Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

'Sesame Street' has included children and a new character with autism.
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dr. Wendy Stone is a professor of psychology and director of the READi lab at the University of Washington. Dr. Stone was a consultant for Sesame Street as they created their first character with autism, Julia. Julia is also a character in their digital storybook, "We're Amazing, 1,2,3!"  

Sesame seared Ahi tuna at Elliot's in Seattle. This was taken in 2011, how has the city's food evolved?
Flickr Photo/Mubnii M. (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle restaurateur Rachel Yang about how the tech industry and increased diversity are changing the cuisine of the city.  

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Avina Gutierrez, one of the first two Latinos elected to the Yakima City Council. The historic election comes after the ACLU sued the city for disenfranchising Hispanic voters. 

Flickr Photo/disordered eyes gave me this photographs (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Sometimes, birds get divorced.

“If you've had poor reproductive success with a particular mate, maybe it's better for both members of that pair to seek new mates or new territories with new mates,” said John Marzluff, a professor of forest sciences at the University of Washington. He’s the author of “Welcome to Subirdia.”

Brown marmorated stink bug
Wikipedia Photo/Yerpo (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Washington State University entomologist Elizabeth Beers about a newly discovered parasitic wasp that is preying on an invasive stinkbug. 

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Jeannie Yandel sits down with security professional Scott McArthur to discuss the rise of threat assessment teams across the county that work to intervene and prevent violent incidents like mass shootings. McArthur is president of the Northwest chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals. 

Garfield High School in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel talks to KUOW education reporter Ann Dornfeld about why the Seattle Public School District is considering changes to when the school day starts for the high schools.

Justin Trudeau.
Flickr Photo/John McCallum (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the results of Canada's federal election. Justin Trudeau led the Liberal Party to a majority government win on Monday.

2005 Gay Pride Parade in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Andrew Hitchcock (CC BY 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen, lead author of a study which shows older LGBTQ adults in King County are more at risk of poor health and mental distress than other seniors in the county. 

Teal Victoria reads to her 3-year-old daughter Kai at their northeast Seattle home. Kai is on a ventilator and is cared for around the clock at home by her mother and her nurses.
Courtesy of Trujillo

Dozens of young Washington children who are dependent on ventilators could be living at home, but are stuck in expensive hospitals instead.

That's because Medicaid pay for nurses to care for them at home is so low -- about $10 an hour less than the market rate, reporter Levi Pulkkinen told KUOW's Jeannie Yandel on The Record.

Matt Remle drafted the resolution adopted by the Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing negative consequences of the American Indian boarding schools
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Matt Remle about the continued impact of American Indian boarding schools on Native American communities. Remle, a member of the Lakota tribe, drafted the resolution adopted by Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing trauma these boarding schools caused in Washington and across the U.S. is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel talks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about why Amazon responded to the New York Times' piece about its work culture two months after the fact, why the video messaging app Snapchat secretly opened a Seattle engineering office, and what the closure of the Urbanspoon office says about the Seattle tech landscape.  

Jeannie Yandel talks with Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about the role of professional sports in conversations about race, gender and social justice.

Jonathan Grant, Jon Grant
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Jeannie Yandel speaks with political reporter Josh Feit about how a downtown land deal was felled by a text message. Feit is the politics editor at Seattle Met magazine and founder/editor of their politics blog PubliCola.

New University of Washington president Ana Marie Cauce in the KUOW greenroom.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ana Marie Cauce, newly selected president of the University of Washington, about her commitment to the school and her plans as its new leader.