Jeannie Yandel | KUOW News and Information

Jeannie Yandel

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2001

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/Daniel Hartwig/(CC BY 2.0)https://flic.kr/p/6eDGEA

Jeannie Yandel speaks with NPR music critic Ann Powers about her most recent book, "Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music."

Coast Guard Petty Officers 3rd Class Eric Gordon and Gavin Kershaw pilot a 16-foot flood punt boat and join good Samaritans in patrolling a flooded neighborhood in Friendswood, Texas, Aug. 29, 2017. The flood punt team from Marine Safety Unit Paducah, Ken
Flickr Photo/Coast Guard News/(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/WZGrcJ

Bill Radke speaks with Amy Costello, founder and managing editor of the Tiny Spark podcast, about why you need to be careful with the donations that you send to help with the flooding in Houston. 

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times report Mike Rosenberg about his article that shows how Seattle has become a company town for Amazon.

Crosscut Columnist Knute Berger also joins the conversation to talk about how he has seen this same pattern with Boeing and Microsoft before.

We also hear from listener on how this change has impacted them.

A sketch of The Emerald, a 40-foot condominium tower planned at 2nd and Stewart near Pike Place Market in downtown Seattle. Chinese investors helped make the project possible.
Hewitt Seattle

Seattleites love to blame outsiders for skyrocketing housing prices.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with CBC host Stephen Quinn about British Columbia's attempts to slow their escalating housing market. Quinn explains that there has been no relief after a year of a tax on foreign buyers, and attempts to charge people for housing that is left intentionally vacant has also not chipped away at skyrocketing prices. Quinn also explains loopholes that wealthy residents have found to buy up larger tracts of land and turn them into spots for giant mansions.

A wild Pacific salmon, left, next to an escaped farm-raised Atlantic salmon, right, on Aug. 22 at Home Port Seafoods in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Jeannie Yandel talks to Renee Erickson, Seattle chef, author and owner of The Walrus and The Carpenter, and Barton Seaver, author, chef and the director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at Harvard University, about farming seafood and the future of salmon consumption. 

Courtesy of WSDOT/Ally Barrera

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ally Barrera and Mike Allende, the minds behind two of Washington Department of Transportation's Twitter accounts, @wsdot and @wsdot_traffic. They are known for posting gifs, memes and hand drawn maps to make Seattle area traffic just a little less awful. 

Wallingford is one of several Seattle neighborhoods that will see an increase in affordable housing under the citywide rezone
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9jiSQm

Jeannie Yandel talks to Becco Zou, a realtor with Berkshire Hathaway in Bellevue, and Marc Stiles, a real estate reporter with the Puget Sound Business Journal, about how foreign buyers impact the local housing market. 

Highway sign on a road entering the Hanford Site
Wikipedia Photo/Ellery (CC BY SA 3.0)/http://bit.ly/1LnhFqH

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Northwest News Network reporter Anna King about the continued problem of cleaning up the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Eastern Washington. The topic was in the news because John Oliver talked about the contaminated site on his satirical HBO show. 

The statue of Vladimir Lenin in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood.
Flickr Photo/Martin Deutsch (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o6EKZs

Jeannie Yandel speaks with multiple people about the statue of Vladimir Lenin in the Fremont neighborhood. 

Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jeannie Yandel talks to University of Washington associate professor Joe Janes about the Golden Records, a NASA project that compiled sounds and images from earth to send up with NASA's Voyager spacecraft in the hopes of it reaching extraterrestrial life.

Jeannie Yandel talks to Ron Warren, head of the fish program for the Washington State Fish and Wildlife Department, about non-native salmon swimming in Washington water after they escaped from pens at a fish farm off the coast of Cypress Island near Anacortes.  

Confederate flag
Flickr Photo/pixxiestails (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Melanie McFarland, T.V. critic for Salon, and Mike Pesca, host of The Gist, about a proposed HBO show called Confederate. The show imagines a world where the South won the Civil War, slavery still exists in parts of the United States and the country is on the brink of it's third civil war. 

Museum goers test out their eclipse glasses on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Pacific Science Center before the start of the solar eclipse, in Seattle. KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Jeannie Yandel talks to KUOW producer Matt Martin about his experience viewing the total solar eclipse in Oregon. We also hear from Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA's chief scientist, about what it was like to view the eclipse from the air in a plane. 

From left, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, former Gov. Chris Gregoire and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray at the back of a helicopter overlooking a flood zone in Washington state. Story goes that only the women in the WA delegation were brave enough to scoot this far.
Courtesy of Maria Cantwell's office

"There's never a time when a woman really wins anything," says political strategist Cathy Allen.

After Seattle's 2017 mayoral race primary, Allen and University of Washington professor Cate Goethals discussed gender equity in politics and business on KUOW's The Record. 

Parking in Seattle could become a thing of the past.
Flickr Photo/James Callan (CC BY NC SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4mBfBq

Bill Radke talks with Donald Shoup, a UCLA professor and urban planner who studies parking. A new study says that drivers in Seattle spend an average of 58 hours a year looking for parking, and Shoup explains some of the ways the city could cut those hours down. He also tells a story of how he found out that Pike Place Market is ground zero for Seattle's parking problem.

Bill Radke talks to Anna King, a journalist with the Northwest News Network, about her reporting on the Hanford tunnel collapse, including why it happened and what it means for other nuclear waste storage sites at Hanford. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Ijeoma Oluo, editor at large of The Establishment, and Eula Scott Bynoe, co-host of HellaBlackHellaSeattle, about the conversations they've been having in the wake of the shooting of Charleena Lyles. 

Megan Farmer / KUOW

Bill Radke talks with Dr. Willie Parker about how to have an honest disagreement about abortion.

Ariana Grande has canceled shows in London and put her tour on hold following Monday's bombing at a concert in Manchester that killed 22 people and injured dozens more.

Yesterday Britain's prime minister Theresa May put the country on high alert, deploying the military to help guard against another attack while police investigate whether more people were involved in Monday's bombing.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield about the latest news from the Washington State Legislature.

Lorena Gonzalez at her election night party on Nov. 3, 2015, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle City Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez about the legislation the City Council passed that will increase civilian oversight of the Seattle Police Department. 

Photos courtesy of John Nowak/CNN

W. Kamau Bell remembers the first time he encountered blatant racism — which until then seemed like an outdated concept his mom talked about. He was 15 years old and shopping at Rose Records in Chicago when a store security officer threw him (literally) out into the street.

alcohol beer taps
Flickr Photo/Arvind Grover (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SmmftY

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Kendall Jones, from the Washington Beer Blog, and Robyn Schumacher, co-owner and brewer at Stoup Brewing in Ballard, about Washington's longstanding love story with beer. We have more craft beer makers here than any other region in America — 174 of in the Seattle-Tacoma area, according to market researcher Datafiniti. 

Mackenzie Tolliver and Elisha Edlen, players on the Seattle Majestics.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel speaks with two members of the undefeated women’s tackle football team the Seattle Majestics. Elisha Edlen and Mackenzie Tolliver discuss the difficulties in playing and promoting football for women while being overshadowed by the Seahawks (and the local lingerie football league). They also talk about how far the sport has come in recent years and encouraging signs that more and more women are learning that they too can play tackle football.

Dan Charles

Jeannie Yandel speaks with NPR food reporter Dan Charles about a new apple variety coming to Washington state known as the Cosmic Crisp. Washington grows 70 percent of the apples in the United States, and Red Delicious is the largest single variety grow in the state.

But Americans don't really buy Red Delicious apples anymore. Only half of the 2016 crop has been sold. And the majority of those have gone overseas. Most American shoppers like other varieties - the Honeycrisp, the Gala, the Pink Lady. So apple growers are changing things up. They're hoping Cosmic Crisp will be a big hit among apple lovers. 

Having a phone in your hand while driving could cost you $136 under the new law.
Flickr Photo/Intel Free Press

Jeannie Yandel talks to Austin Jenkins, KUOW's Olympia correspondent, about the distracted driving bill that lawmakers have been working on this session and how it would change the current law. 

FLICKR PHOTO/Ed Suominen(CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/hTZt4V

Jeannie Yandel speaks with KUOW's Morning Edition host Emily Fox about a question she is trying to answer as part of our Local Wonder series. The question was posted by listener Tom Donnelly. He asked, "How far and in what direction do you have to travel away from Seattle to get a full day of sunshine?" Yandel also speaks with State Climatologist Nick Bond about where to find sunshine in the state.

Are you a fan or a superfan?

Apr 13, 2017

Jeannie Yandel talks with Zoe Fraade-Blanar and Aaron Glazer about what it takes to be a superfan. Zoe Fraade-Blanar and Aaron Glazer are co-authors of the book "Superfandom: How our Obsessions Are Changing What We Buy and Who We Are."

Jeff Bezos speaks at the Apollo rocket engine unveiling at The Museum of Flight, showing the injector plate from an F-1 rocket used on Apollo 12.
Courtesy of The Museum of Flight/Ted Huetter

Jeannie Yandel talks to Alan Boyle of Geekwire about the possibility of taking a hybrid, electric plane for short regional trips and Jeff Bezos' dream of people in space. 

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