Jeannie Yandel

Producer, KUOW Presents

Jeannie Yandel has always been a sucker for a good story.  And she had an epiphany one morning listening to Morning Edition – the consistently best stories out there were coming from NPR.  So in 2001, she started as an intern here at KUOW, working for Weekday.

Since then, Jeannie's produced nearly every show out of KUOW, from Morning Edition to Rewind to The Conversation.  Now she's a producer for The Record.  Her job is to help the people who live in the Puget Sound area tell their own amazing stories on the radio.  It's a pretty perfect job.

Ways To Connect

The Selma to Montgomery March in 1965. Martin Luther King, Jr. is at center.
Public Domain

In March 1965, Steven Graves was studying in a Unitarian seminary in Chicago when he learned Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was asking people from around the country to gather in Selma, Alabama, to march for voting rights for black people.

Graves asked himself an important question that would change his life path.

Jimi Hendrix in 1967.
Wikipedia Photo

Jeannie Yandel talks with music historian and Jimi Hendrix biographer Charles Cross about a collection of early songs featuring Hendrix getting an official re-release.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Derek Orbiso Dizon, vigil coordinator for domestic violence organization, API Chaya, about how his mother inspires him to fight domestic violence and honor victims of domestic abuse. 

Jessica and Blakely Tossey walk along Kent-Des Moines Road. The busy highway does not have sidewalks so Jessica wears a bright-colored sweatshirt.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jessica Tossey is in the living room of her condo, getting herself and young son Blakely ready for their mile-long walk to church, where he goes to preschool.

Jessica puts on a bright orange sweatshirt, shoulders a backpack, grabs Blakely’s hand, and heads out the door.  

Jay Julius is a member of the Lummi Tribe and an outspoken defender of his people's fishing rights
EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Jeannie Yandel talks with Bob Anderson, director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington, about a dispute over fishing rights which went to the federal court in Seattle Monday.

The Makah, the Quileute, and the Quinault Nations disagree over who has the right to fish in territories off the west coast of Washington.

Seattle's city hall was a mishmash of additions, including a basement where some prisoners were sent and brutally treated, fed a minimal diet of bread and water.
Seattle.gov

Little surprises Knute Berger, writer and local historian, when it comes to Seattle history.

So when he discovered that Seattle had used chain gangs – ball and chain style – into the 1900s, he thought, “Chain gangs? That’s a Southern thing.”

Former Rep. Joe McDermott, Rep. Eric Pettigrew and former Rep. Lynn Kessler at an event in 2006.`
Flickr Photo/The Children's Alliance (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with state Rep. Eric Pettigrew, D-Seattle, about the "open-door policy" he's developed for police and why he thinks police don't get enough recognition for the work they do. Pettigrew was recently awarded Legislator of the Year by the Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Marty Hartman about the challenges faced by homeless students in Washington state. Hartman is executive director of Mary's Place, a Seattle nonprofit that provides shelter and resources for homeless women and children.

Seattle gets more clouds than blue sky, so do we really buy that many sunglasses?
Flickr Photo/Phil Buckley

Do Seattleites buy more sunglasses than residents of other cities?

Was there really a dead horse in Ballard’s water supply in the early 1900s?

And did prostitutes start the Seattle School District?

Listener Kristie Fisher of Belltown asked about Seattle’s urban myths as part of our Local Wonder project. So we asked our Facebook friends to share their favorites and chose a few for KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel to investigate.

blind justice law court
Flickr Photo/Scott* (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with  Susan Craighead, King County Superior Court presiding judge, about why she's pushing to eliminate racial disparities in King County's juvenile justice system.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Jennifer Shaw, deputy director of the ACLU of Washington, about the ACLU's independent investigation of the Pasco Police Department's use of force trainings and policies after the shooting of an unarmed man last week.

File photo of Seattle Police at Greenwood Parade in 2008.
Flickr Photo/Natalie Wilkie (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Sue Rahr, executive director of the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, about a  police training program called Blue Courage. Rahr hopes this program will be a step toward changing police culture.

law court crime
Flickr Photo/Joe Gratz (CC BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Judge Veronica Alicea Galvan about her Spanish-only traffic court in Des Moines, Washington.

The organization United4Iran displayed this billboard in Washington, D.C., in 2012 to protest the treatment of Baha'is in Iran.
Flickr Photo/United4Iran (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Mitra Zarakani, an employment specialist at Jewish Family Service's Eastside location, about her immigration to the U.S. and attending a secret university in Iran.

Cameras on the Highway 520 bridge take pictures of license plates as vehicles pass to assess tolls.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times columnist Danny Westneat about the latest issues concerning tolling on the 520 bridge. 

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