Jason Pagano | KUOW News and Information

Jason Pagano

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2012

Jason Pagano is a producer at KUOW, where he works behind the scenes to bring you interviews, news coverage and KUOW’s Week in Review. He’s also worked on KUOW’s Weekday and The Conversation. Before radio, he covered A&E at Seattle alternative weekly The Stranger, polished copy at a Philadelphia ad agency and hung about in a TV studio as much as he could at Seattle’s PBS station. Happy to be from New Jersey but living in Seattle, Jason is a graduate of Rutgers University.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/Still Burning (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1Svg0qt

Bill Radke talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the latest in the investigation just launched by Gov. Jay Inslee into how the state mistakenly released thousands of prisoners early for more than a decade. Some Republican state lawmakers say that's not enough: They want subpoena power. 

Paul Guppy, Bill Radke, Erica Barnett and John Roderick.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Why would lottery riches ruin other people's lives, but not yours? Is President Barack Obama right that we’re too partisan?

Farewell, tipping. Farewell, David Bowie. Hello, The Long Winters' John Roderick,  journalist Erica “Crank” Barnett, Washington Policy Center's Paul Guppy and host Bill Radke on Week In Review.

A view from inside a Boeing factory
Courtesy of Boeing

Bill Radke talks with Wall Street Journal aerospace reporter Jon Ostrower about surprising news this week from Boeing and its engineering union: They agree. They've announced a deal on a new contract that would give 20,000 engineers and technical workers a six-year contract extension. 

Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about how much partisan dysfunction exists in the Washington State Legislature, where there is a Republican Senate and a Democratic house. In his final State of the Union Address Tuesday, President Obama said "Democracy grinds to a halt without a willingness to compromise." 

Ken Griffey, Jr. uniform
Flickr Photo/hj_west (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SAIEpn

Bill Radke talks with Mike Pesca of Slate's The Gist podcast about Ken Griffey, Jr.'s chances to make baseball's Hall of Fame.

In this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Bill Radke speaks with Joanna Paul, of the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility, and Dave Workman with the Second Amendment Foundation, about their reaction to President Obama's executive action on gun control. 

SPU shooting: Seattle Pacific University students pray and comfort each other the day after a campus shooting on Thursday, June 4, 2014.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke talks with Seattle attorney Eric Stahl of Davis Wright Tremaine about the ruling by a Washington state court that says the public can see surveillance video of the June 2014 fatal shooting at Seattle Pacific University. The Court of Appeals ruled that state public disclosure law requires the videos to be released to local media organizations, with partial editing to protect some identities. 

Bill Radke talks with state representative Matt Manweller (R-Ellensburg) about a proposal to protect controversial speech on college campuses in Washington.

Flickr Photo/Keith Allison (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1k3J8Gt

Seahawks QB Russell Wilson was so good for two years. Then, he was kind of mediocre for a while. He's back to throwing touchdowns now, but was his slump really his girlfriend's fault? Bill Radke talks with writer Danielle Campoamor.

Washington state auditor Troy Kelley arrives at the federal courthouse in Tacoma, Wash., for a hearing Monday, May 11, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley surprised his colleagues this week – by showing up for work. He's been on unpaid leave since last spring while awaiting trial on federal money laundering and tax evasion charges relating to his private real estate business. Bill Radke talks about the latest turn in the Kelley saga with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins.

Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. at KUOW Public Radio on Tuesday.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A large statue of George Washington, the first U.S. president, looms large over the University of Washington’s main campus.

Should the statue’s inscription read “slave owner”? Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. believes so.

The Alhamdan family -- two parents and six children -- arrived recently in Seattle from Syria. They are joining a tiny community of 25 recent Syrian refugees.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The Washington State Republican Party is accusing Governor Jay Inslee of distorting history when it comes to his open-door policy toward Syrian refugees following the Paris terror attacks.

Inslee has said we should continue slowly resettling Syrian refugees into the U.S. and Washington. To bolster his case, Inslee used the example of Vietnamese refugees who were welcomed here in the 1970s by then-governor Dan Evans.

How right is that comparison? And how should we balance American values in a time of fear?

Bill Radke talks these issues over with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison, former Washington Governor Dan Evans and Democratic Congressman Jim McDermott.

The French flag flies over the Space needle on Saturday Nov. 14. It was one of several displays of solidarity with France in Seattle after the terrorist attacks on Nov. 13.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Does the Space Needle flying the French flag in solidarity with victims of the Paris terror attacks represent a racist monopoly on grief? Bill Radke talks with The Stranger's Charles Mudede.

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of Escherichia coli, grown in culture and adhered to a cover slip.
Flickr Photo/NIAID (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MtIngO

The sleuthing is under way to figure out what has sickened at least 22 people in an E. coli outbreak linked to Chipotle restaurants.

Health officials said Monday that they’re still unsure which food is responsible, but the number of cases is expected to rise beyond the 19 in Washington and three in Oregon reported so far. Seven people have been hospitalized in Washington, one in Oregon.

Seattle City Council position 8 candidates Jon Grant and Tim Burgess.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Standing outside the KUOW station, we asked Seattle City Council candidate Jon Grant what he would do if he lost.

He would pay off his debt, he said. Then he paused.

Did we know that 54 percent of the city voted against his opponent in the primary? (Grant got 31 percent in the primary.)

A traffic camera on Mercer Street
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds weighs the costs and benefits of the Move Seattle levy with Eugene Wasserman, of Keep Seattle Affordable: No on Prop 1, and Shefali Ranganathan with Transportation Choices Coalition. City leaders are asking Seattle voters to approve the nine-year, $930 million property tax for transportation projects they say will make it safer and easier to get around.

Daniel Bagley Elementary School in north Seattle.
Joe Wolf/Flickr Photo (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Bill Radke talks with Seattle school board member Harium Martin-Morris about a new policy to stop suspending elementary students for nonviolent misbehavior.

Ross Reynolds talks with Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz about why President Xi Jinping is putting meetings with tech and business leaders in Seattle ahead of a trip to the White House.

Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)/ http://bit.ly/1QiDCKB

Ross Reynolds talks with state Representatives Matt Manweller (R-Ellensburg) and Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) about a proposed initiative that would make state Supreme Court justices recuse themselves from cases involving donors who've given them more than $1,000.

Mount Baker glacier as seen from a helicopter in 2009.
Flickr Photo/judy_and_ed (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton about her story on the alarming melting of Northwest glaciers due to hot weather and low snowpack. Scientists say glaciers across the North Cascades could shrink by as much as 10 percent this year.

Ross Reynolds talks with Kelly McBride, media ethicist at the Poynter Institute, about the backlash from the New York Times' story "Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace." The paper's public editor Margaret Sullivan has weighed in, saying the story was "driven less by irrefutable proof than by generalization and anecdote." Was the story fair? 

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

It’s a bruising, even brutal, workplace where an employee caring for a dying parent is seen as “a problem” and people cry at their desks. Or it’s an exhilarating place where even lower-level workers can change the way business gets done in America.

Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop and the Seattle Times’ Jon Talton told KUOW's Ross Reynolds that a New York Times story over the weekend and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ passionate response to it provide an intriguing, complex look inside a company that has remade retail and the city it calls home.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Parks and Recreation superintendent Jesús Aguirre about how the city is cutting back on water use to help head off a water shortage.

Activists from the Seattle chapter of Black Lives Matter took over the stage at a rally for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sat., Aug 8, 2015. They called for four minutes of silence, and Sanders left the stage to greet those who had come to see him.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

How Seattle reacted to the disruption of Bernie Sanders’ appearance at a rally this weekend reveals the city is still unwilling to honestly talk about race, an NAACP leader said Monday.

Gerald Hankerson, president of Seattle-King County NAACP, told KUOW’s Todd Mundt that the incident shows that’s “a difficult conversation to have, even with your allies.”

King County primary ballot.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks with Todd Donovan, professor at Western Washington University, about why more people won't be voting in Tuesday's primary election.

Take us somewhere special. 

That’s what we asked the 47 candidates running for the new City Council districts in Seattle.

Claudia Castro Luna
Courtesy Claudia Castro Luna

Seattle’s first-ever civic poet sees fertile ground for verse in this city’s “time of transition” amid rapid growth.

Claudia Castro Luna, appointed Monday by Mayor Ed Murray, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds that something specific about the role called to her.  

A photo of Ann Rule in 1976 from her official website. Rule was the author, most famously, of The Stranger Beside Me, about her personal relationship with serial killer Ted Bundy before he was caught.
Leslie Rule/AuthorAnnRule.com

Marcie Sillman talks with The Stranger's Eli Sanders about bestselling true-crime writer Ann Rule, who died on Sunday at age 83. Sanders wrote an in-depth profile about Rule for The Seattle Times.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata and Roger Valdez of Smart Growth Seattle about whether or not it is time for the city to intervene in rent prices, which have climbed faster here than anywhere in the country.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district. In District 4, which includes Northeast Seattle up to Northeast 85th Street, there are five candidates running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

Pages