Jason Pagano | KUOW News and Information

Jason Pagano

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2012

Jason Pagano is a producer at KUOW, where he works behind the scenes to bring you interviews, news coverage and KUOW’s Week in Review. He’s also worked on KUOW’s Weekday and The Conversation. Before radio, he covered A&E at Seattle alternative weekly The Stranger, polished copy at a Philadelphia ad agency and hung about in a TV studio as much as he could at Seattle’s PBS station. Happy to be from New Jersey but living in Seattle, Jason is a graduate of Rutgers University.

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Bill Radke talks with monologuist Mike Daisey about how Donald Trump has mastered performance to upend politics and hack journalism. It's the subject of his new one-man show, "The Trump Card."

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

UPDATE: Seahawks' wide receiver Doug Baldwin says the Seahawks will interlock arms at Sunday's game against the Miami Dolphins, which falls on the 15th anniversary of 9/11.  

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the former NBA superstar and now cultural icon, made a public statement about inequality in 1968 when he boycotted the Olympics.

But decades later, Abdul-Jabbar doesn’t believe that NFL player Colin Kaepernick should refuse to stand for the national anthem.

Bill Radke talks with former Seattle police chief Norm Stamper about his new book, "To Protect And Serve: How To Fix America's Police."

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about “She Poured Out Her Heart,” by Jean Thompson.

Bill Radke talks with Ben and Emily Huh about why, after 11 years and one internet cat picture empire in Seattle, they're splitting town for good and moving to the Bay Area.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about "The Last Samurai" by Helen DeWitt.

Reagan Jackson, an artist and teacher, didn't think she would participate in a 'Reparations' experiment that started in Seattle.
Michael Maine

Artist Reagan Jackson submitted a request to Seattle’s Reparations project. She explained why in this transcribed interview with KUOW's Bill Radke: 

Our country is like a war-torn nation.


Bill Radke talks with former sportscaster Tony Ventrella, Democratic candidate for Congress in Washington's 8th Congressional District. Ventrella made it through Tuesday's top-two primary election despite abandoning his campaign at the beginning of July.

flossing teeth tooth
Flickr Photo/BGeoFoto (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dM5JKK

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle dentist Dr. George Knutzen about whether or not people should floss. It's one of the most universal public health recommendations and yet the most recent dietary guidelines from the federal government have removed the recommendation to floss. The government says the efficacy of flossing has never been researched. 

Bill Radke talks with Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield about a new push for state lawmakers to pass an assault weapons ban in Washington.

Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens at a pre-convention event on July 24.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens about leaked DNC emails that many Bernie Sanders supporters say prove the party's primary contest was stacked against him.

Alaskan Way viaduct, Seattle waterfront, downtown
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Deborah Wang talks with Initiative 123 backer Kate Martin and opponent Patrick Gordon about whether Seattle should build a waterfront view park along Alaskan Way — and potentially scrap its existing waterfront plans in the process.

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about why Silicon Valley is wading into presidential politics with an open letter to Donald Trump.

Bill Radke talks with comedian Jessi Klein about her memoir, "You'll Grow Out Of It," and why we love tomboys but don't quite know what to do with tom-men.

Bill Radke talks with KUOW health reporter Ruby de Luna about Seattle's new mobile clinic that will provide homeless people around the city with basic medical and mental health care, free of charge.

Bill Radke talks with "Sonicsgate" filmmaker Jason Reid about why Kevin Durant's decision to leave the Oklahoma City Thunder and play for the Golden State Warriors is one of the best moments in the past decade for no-team-having Seattle fans.

Dan Savage and husband Terry Miller are seen in a 2011 photo.
Flickr photo/Chris Tse (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/a69LS4

Bill Radke talks with The Stranger's Dan Savage about why gay clubs and bars haven't faded into the past for the LGBTQ community.

Adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which can carry the Zika virus.
Flickr Photo/NIAID (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/GhRvGn

Bill Radke talks with Dr. David Fleming of Seattle-based global health organization PATH about the public health response to the Zika virus.

A Banksy piece in Boston. Photo taken in 2010.
FLICKR PHOTO/CHRIS DEVERS HTTP://BIT.LY/1SIPWMB (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

It started with a woman named Deja Stwalley, who claimed to be a porn recruiter. 

This recruiter reached out to young women, ages 19 and 20.  

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about Katie Roiphe's "The Violet Hour."

Flickr Photo/Vox Efx (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Princeton University political science professor Christopher Achen about his research into how Americans make up their minds when casting a ballot.

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about the novel "Imagine Me Gone" by Adam Haslett.

Bill Radke talks with former Seattle Supersonic Spencer Haywood about his legal battle with the National Basketball Association and how his Supreme Court case paved the way for a generation of NBA stars.

film movie
Flickr Photo/StudioTempura (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/64xwT6

Bill Radke talks with Seattle Times columnist Nicole Brodeur and The Stranger's Sean Nelson about Seattle International Film Festival's choice to open this year's festival with the new Woody Allen film.

Kenneth Bae spent two years in a North Korean prison
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

After a year in the North Korean prison, Kenneth Bae softened toward his guards.


Deborah Wang speaks with Saru Jayaraman, author of "FORKED: A New Standard for American Dining," about why restaurant-goers should ask not only "Is the fish sustainably sourced?" but also "How much do you pay your dishwasher?" and "Why do you have an all-white wait staff?" Her book calls out restaurants who treat their workers poorly, and praises those who take what she calls the "high road" to profitability.

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about "The Color of Lightning" by Paulette Jiles.

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, addressing the Chicago Green Festival in 2010.
Chris Eaves/Wikimedia Commons CC by 2.0

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now! on activist power: 

Bernie Sanders did not start a movement; he tapped into a movement.

The Occupy movement, which never really ended, even though people thought that didn't amount to a hill of beans.

Oh, that's not true.

You say the 1 percent today. And the 99 percent. Everyone knows what you mean. They occupied the language. The word “occupy” was the most looked-up for use word of 2011.

(You change the language, you change the world.)

Bill Radke talks with Washington Republican Chris Vance, who is running for U.S. Senate, about why he'll be writing in John Kasich instead of voting for his party's likely presidential nominee.

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about the novel "Vexation Lullaby" by Justin Tussing.

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