Jamala Henderson

Morning Newscaster/ Reporter

Jamala has been with KUOW since July 2004. She graduated from The Evergreen State college in Washington, where she focused on film, video and media studies. After several years working in video production, she began to pursue radio while working for the University of Washington's television station, UWTV. After a short stint as a volunteer radio host at KBCS public radio in Bellevue, she took the position of Broadcaster at the Evergreen Radio Reading Service, a radio reading service for the blind. 

Ways To Connect

KUOW's Jamala Henderson attended a conference about encouraging young women to pursue careers in tech on Wednesday. Below are a collection of tweets -- many of them from Jamala -- that emerged from the conference. 

Courtesy of Megan Fu

It’s summertime in Seattle, and deep inside a basement classroom of the Paul Allen computer science building at the University of Washington, Justin Bieber is being deconstructed.

AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili

Days after Boeing said it would look outside the Puget Sound area to build the 777X, the aerospace giant formally introduced the jetliner at the Dubai Airshow this weekend.

KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

One reason the Puget Sound region stayed stronger than some surrounding areas during the economic downturn is because of its tech industry. A particular bright spot is the computer gaming and interactive media industry.

Twitter Photo/@acmyscp

Fast food workers have begun striking in Seattle this morning. According to organizers, strike lines will take place at several coffee spots around the downtown area.

Flickr Photo/jseattle

Former Washington State Republican Party Chairman Kirby Wilbur surprised many of his colleagues when he resigned close to a month ago. Wilbur went to work for Young America’s Foundation, a conservative organization with a mission to train young people for jobs in the media.

Flickr Photo/Matt Biddolph

People in the City of SeaTac could vote this November on an initiative that would create a $15 an hour hour minimum wage for thousands of workers at Sea-Tac airport and other places. The so-called “Good Jobs Initiative” would apply to about 6,500 workers in transportation and hospitality jobs in the City of SeaTac. Tuesday night, the SeaTac City Council decided to allow the measure to go before voters.

Oregon Public Broadcasting Photo/April Baer

Voters in Portland, Oregon have decide not to add fluoride to their municipal drinking water. Seattle and most other large cities in the US added the chemical decades ago to prevent cavities in children.

John Cook

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn announced a new start-up business initiative Thursday May 9  to support and boost technology business start-ups in Seattle. Technology reporter and GeekWire co-founder John Cook was part of the advisory group that aided the city’s process.

A new bill will be proposed this week in the Washington state Legislature that aims to limit access to the criminal records of juvenile offenders.

A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer
Photo: caraballo-farman

The pink ribbon has been an incredibly successful piece of marketing for breast cancer research. But for new media artist and cancer survivor Leonor Caraballo, that pink ribbon is supremely annoying. She always hated the color pink, and Caraballo wanted to come up with a symbol that she didn't find infantilizing.

As an artist, Caraballo collaborates with her husband, Abou Farman, under the name caraballo-farman. And the couple came up with a new approach to representing breast cancer that's very different from pink ribbons. They started making bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that you can wear around your neck or put on your desk.

In his story, Object Breast Cancer, Independent Producer Eric Molinsky also discovered that this artwork is creating buzz among cancer researchers.

Other stories from KUOW Presents:

"The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show" debuted on television screens in 1959. The cartoon featured an all-American squirrel and his pal the moose hotly pursued by Boris and Natasha — the Russian-accented spies with a knack for falling on their own grenades. "The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show" parodied the space race, the arms race between the US and the Soviets, and also took its share of digs at the American government and military. In an era when Yogi Bear was stealing pies off window sills — never before had an animated cartoon carried such political currency. And as Studio 360’s Julia Wetherell reports in Rocky and Bullwinkle and the Cuban Missile Crisis, it just might have predicted the fall of communism.

Other stories from KUOW Presents:

In 2003, Noel worked at an ad agency. Like everyone else at the agency, Noel wanted to work with high-profile, flashy clients like Apple. Then an insurance company hired the ad agency, and everyone, including Noel, hoped to avoid what looked like a boring job for a boring client. Of course, Noel got stuck working with the insurance company, trying to help them explain how simple it was to sign up for their insurance online. That insurance company was GEICO. And Noel’s work led to GEICO’s well-known caveman ads. In an interview titled "What Gave You That Idea?" with producer Starlee Kine, we're guided back through Noel's surprising, culturally rich path of inspiration. 

Other stories from KUOW Presents

Idaho is considering whether to keep three education laws that overhaul everything from how teachers are paid to how kids learn in the classroom.

Other stories from KUOW Presents

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