Jamala Henderson | KUOW News and Information

Jamala Henderson

Newscaster/ Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Jamala has been with KUOW since July 2004. She graduated from The Evergreen State college in Washington, where she focused on film, video and media studies. After several years working in video production, she began to pursue radio while working for the University of Washington's television station, UWTV. After a short stint as a volunteer radio host at KBCS public radio in Bellevue, she took the position of Broadcaster at the Evergreen Radio Reading Service, a radio reading service for the blind. 

Ways to Connect

Faith leaders meet with U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell at the Jewish Federation of Seattle on Friday to discuss recent hate crimes.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Seattle police are investigating after a Capitol Hill synagogue was vandalized with anti-Semitic, Holocaust-denying graffiti.

In a message posted on the Facebook of Temple De Hirsch Sinai, Rabbi Daniel Weiner said the graffiti was spray-painted on the facade of the temple's Old Sanctuary and discovered Friday morning.

Seattle Times writer Tyrone Beason has an essay about race in the Pacific Northwest Magazine.
KUOW photo/Katherine Banwell

When Tyrone Beason called his father after Donald Trump was elected, the conversation didn’t start in the turmoil of the present.

“He started to talk about segregation, those ugly times in his formative years that shaped his understanding not only of what it was to be black but what it was to be white,” Beason told KUOW’s Jamala Henderson. 


A panel at Garfield High School on Monday discusses the NAACP's proposal to require ethnic studies.
Jamala Henderson

Seattle’s NAACP chapter and some Seattle educators want ethnic studies to become required learning in the city's public schools.

On Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, teachers, students and parents crowded into a medium-sized Garfield High School classroom to hear speakers talk about the proposal.

Quinton Morris, violin professor.
Courtesy of Quinton Morris

Quinton Morris is a violin virtuoso who wants to give back. The Seattle University teacher grew up in Renton and fondly remembers the support he got from the community. He says that encouragement is important for people of color who want to be classical musicians. Morris told Jamala Henderson how he was often discouraged.  

KUOW general manager Caryn Mathes
KUOW Photo

Journalism is so white.

That’s a criticism of newsrooms in America, and the numbers show that it’s true: In radio, just 9.4 percent of journalists are people of color.

The old Liberty Bank building in Seattle's Central Area before it was demolished. Affordable housing will go up in its place.
Google Maps

There's a new building going up in the heart of Seattle's Central District.

It's a project that could help bring back renters who've been priced out of the neighborhood.


An artist's rendition of a 130,000-square-foot computer science building that the University of Washington is preparing to build.
LMN Architects

A $10 million gift from tech giant Amazon.com will help the University of Washington complete a second building on the Seattle campus dedicated to computer science and engineering.

Adrienne Bailey, 62, recalls when black people in Seattle had to buy or rent homes with the help of benevolent whites, who were known as shields.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

When you drive to north Seattle from south Seattle, you may notice that the city becomes a lot more white. That’s because north Seattle is 69 percent white, according to Census data. South Seattle is just 28 percent white. Of non-whites in the south end, Asians make up the majority at 36 percent.

Listener David Newman asked the Local Wonder team to look into why Seattle seems so segregated. Our first stop was the Ship Canal, that skinny waterway near Husky Stadium that connects Lake Washington with Puget Sound.

A water fountain at the UW Medical Center is off limits after the discovery of the Legionnaires' disease bacteria in part of the hospital.
KUOW PHOTO/MATT MARTIN

The bacteria that causes deadly Legionnaires’ disease has been found in the water supply in part of the UW Medical Center, health officials said Wednesday.

The disease has killed at least one patient at the hospital, and another patient was sickened but recovered.

A pedestrian crosses Lake City Way near Northeast 125th Street in Seattle's City Council District 5.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

The city of Seattle wants drivers to slow down.

On Tuesday officials announced a plan to reduce the speed limit on all streets without posted signs.

There won't be as many happy test-takers in the new future, predicts the Washington State Department of Licensing. That's because a new test replaces the old one on Monday, and there will be more questions.
Flickr Photo/John Meehan CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 http://bit.ly/2boP91R

A new Washington state driver's test debuted on Monday.

The number of questions has been upped to 40, and there are some new topics.

Sunset on Sept. 13, 2012 in Seatac. The deep red color was caused by smoke from numerous forest fires buring in the Cascade Mountains.
Flickr Photo/Brett Curtiss CC BY 2.0 http://bit.ly/2au4fiI

It wasn’t the aroma of Tacoma on Tuesday.

It was the smoky smell of Seattle.

Not like barbecue, though. More like a light tree fumée.

As the car's bumper breaks the laser curtains, cameras capture the front and back license plates and a sensor pings for any Good To Go transponders.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The pause on Interstate 405 tolls during nights and weekends could be made permanent. The state's transportation commission is set to finalize the change in rules this week.

After many complaints from drivers about congested commutes through the corridor, the commission in March adopted a temporary change that stopped tolling during off hours.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee wants to recognize the LGBTQ community for more than just one month out of the year. 

So he's issued a directive to promote LGBTQ inclusion practices and policies into state government. 


A stairway descends into Capitol Hill’s light rail station.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It’s been three months since two light rail stations opened in Seattle, bringing tens of thousands of riders to the system. 

But if you've had trouble with your cell phone down in those tunnels, here's why: There's no working network there yet.

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