Emily Fox | KUOW News and Information

Emily Fox

Host, Morning Edition

Year started with KUOW: 2016

Emily comes to KUOW from Michigan Radio, an NPR station that covers the lower half of Michigan’s “mitten”. There she was a producer, reporter and host. She fell in love with radio in college, where she was a talk show host and news director at Michigan State University’s college radio station.

Emily received her undergraduate degree in Music Education and her Master’s in Telecommunication at Michigan State University. 

A large group of mountain goats moves along slope near Mount Baker. The photo was taken from the air in late July by state wildlife researchers.
Courtesy of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

That’s a lot of mountain goats – 90 to be exact. The aerial photo was taken in late July near Mount Baker by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

There's been a recent rebound for a species that was decimated decades ago by hunting, the department’s Rich Harris told KUOW’s Emily Fox.


Heroin needle
Flickr Photo/William Fahrnbach (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qNv4vL

Emily Fox talks with Molly Carney, executive director of Evergreen Treatment Services, about a new opioid treatment clinic opening this week in Renton.

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle joined the protest inside the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle helped shout down former CIA director Leon Panetta at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night – and he's not sorry about it.

There was no script for the protest Tuesday night by Bernie supporters, who walked out after Hillary Clinton's formal nomination and jammed the media center.
KUOW PHOTO/KATE WALTERS

If you compare the tone of the Republican convention with Bill Clinton's speech on Tuesday night and Michelle Obama's two nights ago, you could argue that the Democrats are more positive.

But that’s what you see on stage. These are giant theatrical productions.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Don't count on Charles Adkins, a Sanders delegate from Everett, to get on the Clinton train just yet.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Washington state delegates are split into two camps in Philadelphia this week at the Democratic National Convention.

Nearly three quarters of our state’s delegates are Bernie Sanders supporters. The rest back Hillary Clinton. 

So you’d expect some tension.


J GRGRY, or Joe Gregory, one of the performers at Capitol Hill Block Party.
http://music.lafamos.com/jgrgry

Capitol Hill's Block party is happening this weekend and Joe Gregory, also known as J GRGRY, will be one of many performers.

But this performance is especially important for Gregory. The Capitol Hill neighborhood made an impact on him when he was a teen in the 1990s.


ODESZA is made up of Harrison Mills and Clayton Knight, who met at Western Washington University.
Tonje Thilesen

Capitol Hill Block Party is happening this weekend and Seattle-based electronic duo, ODESZA will be headlining.

The duo is made up of Harrison Mills and Clayton Knight. They met at Western Washington University in 2012 and Knight says they’ve been collaborating ever since.


Washington state delegates who supported Ted Cruz pose in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention.
KUOW PHOTO/MATT MARTIN

Donald Trump officially accepted the Republican nomination for president Thursday night in Cleveland.

That ended what's been a pretty dramatic national convention. KUOW’s David Hyde told host Emily Fox what it’s been like.


Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, at the GOP convention in Cleveland on July 18.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Sen. Ted Cruz spoke at the Republican convention Wednesday night — and got booed.

It wasn't something he said. It was what he didn’t say: He refused to endorse Donald Trump.

And that didn’t sit well with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison.

Lots of members of Washington state's delegation to the GOP convention still back Ted Cruz. They wore these T-shirts Wednesday morning at their hotel in Cleveland.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

In the end, the rebellion was crushed. Donald Trump was nominated as the GOP’s presidential candidate.

All of Washington state’s delegate votes were cast for him Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

“Forty-four votes for Donald J. Trump!” state GOP chair Susan Hutchison said in delivering the delegation on the convention floor.


Washington state delegate Braedon Wilkerson says Donald Trump fails the constitutional test.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Call it the five stages of grief for delegates who oppose Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention.

KUOW’s David Hyde is in Cleveland, and he told host Emily Fox that many in Washington state’s delegation are feeling that.

Jevon Lawson wore a diamond pendant with pale green gems mimicing the OxyContin trail from Los Angeles to Washington state.
(US Marshals Service)

Emily Fox talks with Los Angeles Times reporter Harriet Ryan about how an illegal OxyContin ring in Southern California helped spark an opioid epidemic in Snohomish County.

This Capitol Hill, Seattle home could be bought on a single middle class income for a family of six for $16,000 in 1957.
KUOW Photo/Emily Fox

When I thought about moving to Seattle a few months ago, I was shocked at how expensive everything was.

I grew up in a Michigan town where the average house is worth about $125,000 today, and rent goes for about half of what it is in Seattle.

Knowing the lifestyle that my middle class grandparents were able to have here 60 years ago, I wondered if that Seattle will ever be able to be achievable again for middle class folks like me.

Sixgill shark in the waters around Seattle.
Screenshot from YouTube

Emily Fox talks with filmmaker Michael Werner about his new documentary, "Mystery Sharks of Seattle." It airs on Wednesday at 9 p.m. on KCTS.

Prison bars file photo.
Flickr Photo/Neil Conway (CC BY2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6NUT6x

Emily Fox talks with Karen Lee, CEO of Pioneer Human Services, about how to disrupt the cycle of convicted criminals returning to prison after they're released. This week, Lee was appointed to Governor Jay Inslee's Statewide Reentry Council.

Aishah Jilani, left, wrote the hashtag #notinmyname in Arabic during a vigil at Cal Anderson Park for the victims of the Orlando shooting.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Emily Fox talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the mass shooting in Orlando and how Seattle is stepping up safety efforts for the Pride Parade later this month.

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

Emily Fox talks with Lt. Col. Clayton Braun about Cascadia Rising, a four-day exercise to test the emergency response to a 9.0 magnitude earthquake along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Braun is a member of the Washington State National Guard.

Seattle Municipal Archives

Emily Fox talks with Crosscut's Knute Berger about the rental crisis that affected Seattle in the early 1960's. In anticipation of visitors for the Seattle World's Fair, some Seattle landlords evicted tenants, jacked up rents, and turned their apartments into short-term rentals.


FLICKR PHOTO/JEFF GUNN (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/cK6v3o

Emily Fox talks with Washington state climatologist Nick Bond about what recent warm weather in the Puget Sound region means for temperatures, drought and wildfires this summer.


Naomi Wachira performs her song 'African Girl' at the Northwest Folklife Festival at Seattle Center on Sunday, May 29, 2016.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Naomi Wachira writes in one of her songs that she’s “trying to defy everything they said of us, we who have chocolate skin.”

Those words in “African Girl” speak to the clash of culture and identity that Wachira experienced after she moved to the U.S. at age 19.


Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who is running for president in 2016.
Flickr Photo/Brookings Institution (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Washington state’s presidential primary shows why Hillary Clinton is beating Bernie Sanders nationally, says one political analyst.

The reason can be found in a tale of two western Washingtons, said Reid Wilson, chief political correspondent with Morning Consult, a Washington D.C.-based publication.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Emily Fox talks with reporter Reid Wilson about the national impact of Washington's presidential primary. Reid is chief political correspondent with Morning Consult, a Washington, D.C. based publication.

Climbers descend Mount Everest in good weather.
Courtesy Madison Mountaineering

Death again has marked the climbing season on Mount Everest: four climbers died last week and two more are missing.

Seattle-based guide Garrett Madison’s team was hit by tragedy last year. But he told KUOW’s Emily Fox there was no doubt that he would return to the world’s tallest mountain.

Len Liendsley gets his space set up outside the TRAC Convention Center in Pasco, site of the state Republican convention. 'I just love the party. ... not totally in love with it this year,' he says.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Emily Fox talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about what happened at the Washington state GOP convention in Pasco over the weekend.

Troy Evans preaches at Edge Urban Fellowship in a rundown Grand Rapids, Mich., neighborhood known for prostitution. Inside what looks like an abandoned office building are walls covered by graffiti. There are tattooed people wearing baseball caps and jeans. Three 20-year-old men holding mics get ready to bust out some elaborate dance moves.

It may seem like a hip-hop show, but it's actually church.

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