Emily Fox | KUOW News and Information

Emily Fox

Host, Morning Edition

Year started with KUOW: 2016

Emily comes to KUOW from Michigan Radio, an NPR station that covers the lower half of Michigan’s “mitten”. There she was a producer, reporter and host. She fell in love with radio in college, where she was a talk show host and news director at Michigan State University’s college radio station.

Emily received her undergraduate degree in Music Education and her Master’s in Telecommunication at Michigan State University. 

Deborah Alexander, one of the many people who were tribally disenrolled from the Nooksack tribe, looks out of the window of a safety boat during the first leg of a canoe journey on Thursday, July 27, 2017, in Point Roberts.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The #stopdisenrollment campaign is re-launching today, aimed at getting Native American tribes to stop kicking out members.

Roughly 80 federally recognized tribes in the US have disenrolled members, usually citing reasons such as criminal activity, an error in enrollment, or not having enough native blood.

Flickr Photo/Third Way Think Tank (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/WFNxkD

President Donald Trump talked a lot about immigration in his State of the Union address last night. He said the immigration package in Congress right now would give a path to citizenship for Dreamers, fully secure the border, end the visa lottery and “chain migration.”


Amazon employees walk in front of a map highlighting 238 cities that submitted bids for Amazon's second headquarters in the lobby of the Day 1 building on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Amazon announced the 20 cities it's now considering to be the company's next headquarters. Carolyn Adolf, co-host of KUOW's podcast, Prime(d) talks us through the choices. 


Elle Christensen watches the crowd for Seattle's women's march past her perch at Seventh and Jackson on Jan. 21.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Thousands of people – maybe tens of thousands, according to the city of Seattle — are expected at the second Women’s March in Seattle this Saturday.


Activist group Backbone Campaign hung this banner in September 2015. Chief Seattle is often quoted by environmental groups.
Flickr Photo/Backbone Campaign (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/yJnSzW

“The earth does not belong to us. We belong to the earth.”

These words are from an 1854 speech that made Chief Seattle famous, inspiring environmental movements in the city that bears his name and beyond.

Except, he never really said that.


Julia Yesler, pictured, is the offspring of a Duwamish woman and white settler Henry Yesler.
Courtesy of Kathie Zetterberg

Chief Seattle was the leader of the Duwamish tribe in the days when white settlers were entering the region that would eventually bear his name.

The chief had an unusual way of brokering peace: encouraging his family members to marry the settlers.


Members of the 'Emma canoe' arrive on the shore of the Tsawwassen Indian Reserve after the first leg of their multi-day canoe journey on Thursday, July 27, 2017, in Tsawwassen, British Columbia.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Some are claiming voter fraud in a controversial tribal council election in northwest Washington.

Nooksack tribal membership, tens of millions of federal dollars and a casino are on the line.

Amazon confirmed a second and 'full equal' headquarters somewhere other than in the Puget Sound region.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Regional politicians have been assembling a multi-county strategy to keep Amazon’s growth here.

The company’s announcement last month that it will pick a second headquarters has sent cities scurrying to meet an October 19 deadline.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

Many white Americans believe that black Americans earn close to what their own families make. The truth is far different.

Blacks, on average, earn half of what whites do in this country.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Emily Fox speaks with KUOW's Region of Boom reporter Joshua McNichols about the team's upcoming coverage of Seattle's housing crisis.


A smoky Seattle skyline is shown from N. Northlake Way on Tuesday, September 5, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

With smoke from wildfires filling Seattle’s skies, Dr. Jeff Duchin has some advice for people with respiratory conditions, pregnant women, diabetics, old people, infants and children: Don’t go out.

Shxwhá:y drummer Leonard Gladstone, 17, center, stands while drumming on Thursday, July 27, 2017, while waiting for the 'Emma canoe' to arrive in Tsawassen, British Columbia.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Over the past few weeks, dozens of tribes across the Pacific Northwest have been paddling canoes 200-400 miles on the salty waters between Washington and Vancouver Island.

Deborah Alexander led about a dozen young paddlers on the annual canoe journey along traditional trade routes. Alexander’s canoe was filled with many people, including herself, who have been disenrolled from their tribe.


Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Emily Fox speaks with KUOW reporters Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph about why they spent a month reporting on Bremerton, and what it taught them about our growing region.


South Lake Union neighborhood, home to many Seattle tech companies
Flickr Photo/Tim Eytan (CC-BY-SA-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9yHUyP

Emily Fox talks with immigration attorney Tahmina Watson about President Trump's decision to put an end to the International Entrepreneur Rule, which would have allowed some foreign business owners to build their companies in the U.S.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The federal government explained to the Nooksack tribe Wednesday how it will take over tribal health and social services.

Khu.eex'
Russell Johnson

What do you get when you cross tribal music with jazz and funk? Khu.eex'

That’s the name of a Seattle band performing at this weekend’s Folklife festival in Seattle.

The Birchcrest, a motel in South King County. The motel serves as a low-rent solution for people who are struggling to keep a roof over their heads.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Emily Fox speaks with Brookings researcher Elizabeth Kneebone, co-author with Alan Berube of "Confronting Suburban Poverty in America."

Kneebone and Berube chose five locations to study for their book. South King County was one of them, Kneebone told Fox, because it demonstrates so many national trends. 

How beer gave the City of Kent its name

Apr 30, 2017
Hops pickers at Titus Farm, on the site of modern-day Kent (formerly known as Titusville). Titus farm and Titusville were named after the same prominent family of settlers. Everett E. Titus in white shirt.
White River Valley Museum Collection, Gift of Erle Titus.

When Kent, Washington, was first settled by Europeans, it was called Titusville. So why the name change? Because of beer.

Or, to be more precise, because of hops.

Or, to be even more precise, because of western Washington's great 19th-century hops craze.


FLICKR PHOTO/Ed Suominen(CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/hTZt4V

Jeannie Yandel speaks with KUOW's Morning Edition host Emily Fox about a question she is trying to answer as part of our Local Wonder series. The question was posted by listener Tom Donnelly. He asked, "How far and in what direction do you have to travel away from Seattle to get a full day of sunshine?" Yandel also speaks with State Climatologist Nick Bond about where to find sunshine in the state.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGHAN WALKER

Seattle officials are taking their support for immigrants and refugees a step further: They want to create a $1 million legal defense fund to help people facing deportation.

Seattle would join other cities that have created similar programs, including Los Angeles and New York, in reaction to stricter federal immigration enforcement.


Nooksack tribal police stand outside the courthouse during a disenrollment hearing in 2013.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The sovereignty of the Nooksack tribe is in jeopardy.

This comes after the tribe kicked out about 15 percent of its members — members the tribe says don’t belong.


Assistant Chief Perry Tarrant of the Seattle Police Department.
City of Seattle

Perry Tarrant wants young African Americans to know their rights in interactions with police.

But Tarrant, assistant chief at the Seattle Police Department, told KUOW’s Emily Fox that just as important is knowing what to do if you think you’ve been wronged by the police.


The Black Diamond Museum sits in the town's old railroad depot. Trains no longer run through the city.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Emily Fox speaks with Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph about their team reporting project, Region of Boom, which explores the growth of our region, one town at a time.

Seattle & King County Public Health Officer Dr. Jeff Duchin
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Emily Fox speaks with Dr. Jeff Duchin, public health officer for Public Health-Seattle and King County, about how ending the Affordable Care Act will impact people of color.

Emily Fox talks with journalist Susanna Ray about the impact of high turnover among social workers who work in Washington's foster care system. Ray wrote a series of stories about foster care for the nonprofit Investigate West.

Front page of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper on March 9, 1970.
University of Washington

People across the nation are protesting and Native Americans are occupying. It’s against the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota.

Flickr/Washington State House Republicans

If you look at a map of the presidential vote in Washington, you'll see solid Democratic blue in the Puget Sound region. The large population centers in Western Washington carried the state overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton. But east of the Cascades, every county except for one, voted for Donald Trump. Matt Manweller, Republican state lawmaker from Ellensburg, is also a political science professor at Central Washington University. He spoke with KUOW’s Emily Fox about Trump’s appeal east of the Cascade Mountains.

A view of the Pike Place Market in July 1919.
Seattle Municipal Archives

Pike Place is haunted by the ghosts of children.

Mercedes Carrabba is a second generation vendor at Pike Place. She says the nine acre Pike Place district “is the most haunted location in the city, if not possibly the state.”

President Barack Obama wears a blanket and hat given to him by Brian Cladoosby, left, President of National Congress of American Indians, during the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference, Monday, Set. 26, 2016.
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Many people recognize today as Columbus Day, but that’s not the case in Seattle, Spokane, Olympia and Yakima. Those cities have voted instead to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Seattle Children's Hospital

Emily Fox talks with Dr. David Breland, medical director of the Gender Clinic at Seattle Children's Hospital. The new clinic will provide mental health services, pubertal blockers and hormone therapy for people aged 8 to 21.

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