Derek Wang | KUOW News and Information

Derek Wang

Assignment Editor

Year started with KUOW: 1998.

As KUOW's Assignment Editor, Derek coordinates the news team's daily coverage.

Previously, Derek has been the station's interim news director, the local host for Morning Edition and All Things Considered, a reporter and a producer. Before moving to Seattle, Derek worked at NPR member station WNYC in New York City and CBS News.

Derek has won numerous national and regional journalism awards. He has a bachelor's degree in film from New York University and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University. He and his wife, Gina, live in Seattle.

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KUOW Photo/Derek Wang

It’s been one month since a fatal car crash in Seattle’s Wedgwood neighborhood killed two pedestrians near Eckstein Middle School. The collision also severely injured two people, including an infant, who was 10-days-old at the time.

Bow Jones

Bertha is here. The world’s largest tunnel boring machine arrived in Seattle Tuesday after being shipped from Japan. It’s expected to reach land sometime this week. After that, in a few months, it will get to work drilling the tunnel that will replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Flickr photo/Zolk

King County Metro released more details Monday about possible cuts to bus service next year. The agency says almost a third of its routes might be eliminated.

KUOW Photo/Derek Wang

It’s 3:00 p.m. on a recent workday, and Buddy Yates sets off on the first leg of his long commute home. He and his guide dog, Palmer, step through the fast-food containers that litter the street on the way to Rainier Avenue South where he will catch his first bus.

Flickr Photo/Meaduva

Seattle city council members are scheduled to vote Monday on legislation that could change where the city's food and yard waste ends up. But the latest plan is raising a stink east of the Cascades.

Toll Plan Cheat Sheet

Mar 22, 2013
Flickr Photo/WSDOT

Washington state officials announced proposals on Tuesday to increase the toll rates on the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and the State Route 520 floating bridge. The tolls are being used to pay off bonds that support the financing of the bridge projects. The bond contracts for those bridges are very different, which means the tolling plans are different.

Photo Courtesy/Port of Seattle

The newest Port of Seattle commissioner should be a familiar name to anyone who follows Washington state politics. She’s 33-year-old Courtney Gregoire, daughter of former Washington Governor Chris Gregoire.

Flickr photo/WSDOT

Washington Secretary of Transportation Paula Hammond said Tuesday that cracks in the pontoons for the state Route 520 floating bridge project were largely the result of a flawed design by the state.

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy

Bus service in King County could get some good news this week. Washington state lawmakers are expected to introduce a plan that could prevent a looming fiscal crisis.

Flickr/taestell

The plan to create a bike sharing program in Seattle is clicking into a higher gear. Puget Sound Bike Share hopes to launch in 2014 in parts of the University District, Eastlake, Capitol Hill, South Lake Union, Downtown and Queen Anne. Organizers updated Seattle officials Tuesday on their progress and said they hope to hire a vendor by the spring.

Flickr/Sillygwailo

Sound Transit announced last Friday that its latest ridership numbers for 2012 shows an all-time high. The numbers surpass the agency’s goal for 2012.

A poster aimed at battling sex trafficking in King County.
King County

Seattle-area officials are touting a new campaign to fight human trafficking. Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn announced the new effort Wednesday that mainly involves Clear Channel Media and Entertainment.

Flickr/WSDOT

Imagine having to pay a toll every time you left your city. People on Mercer Island have to face that possibility, because state officials are considering putting tolls on the Interstate 90 floating bridges. I-90 is the only roadway that connects the island to the mainland. A series of public meetings about the idea is being held this week. The first was held Tuesday on Mercer Island.

KUOW photo/Derek Wang

The so-called “ramps to nowhere” near the Washington Park Arboretum are due to come down. It’s part of the project to replace state Route 520 across Lake Washington.  Arboretum officials announced new details Thursday about changes to the park.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT

Even though work on the Highway 520 bridge project is underway, it hasn't been quite clear as to what path the bridge would take from Lake Washington to Interstate 5. But on Tuesday, that path became a little clearer. The Seattle City Council’s Special Committee on the SR 520 Project discussed a series of possible recommendations for the state transportation department.

Photo of 5 garbage and recycling containers
KUOW / Derek Wang

Many Seattle residents are grateful for the new year because it means that their garbage will be picked up every week. At least for now.

For the past six months, 800 Seattle households participated in a pilot program that experimented with picking up the trash every other week. The affected neighborhoods were roughly in the four corners of the city and included Wedgewood.

Photo of Aleta Borschowa, WSDOT Project Engineer
KUOW / Derek Wang

Winter is usually not the season for road construction, but this year, things are a little different. Friday marks the start of eleven planned closures of some Interstate 5 ramps.

Tripat Singh
KUOW photo/Derek Wang

A group of religious leaders from numerous different faiths called on Washington state lawmakers Thursday to change the state’s gun laws. The new group spans several different religions, including Christianity, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism. It represents a new voice joining the chorus that’s calling for more gun restrictions following the Connecticut school shootings.  

Peter Steinbrueck
KUOW photo/Derek Wang

It’s almost a year before the 2013 general election, but the race for Seattle mayor continues to draw a crowd. Former Seattle City Councilman Peter Steinbrueck held a press conference Wednesday morning to formally announce his candidacy.

School buses parked in a parking lot.
Flickr / tncountryfan

Washington Governor Chris Gregoire proposed a new wholesale vehicle fuel tax Tuesday that you might notice at the gas pump. The governor said the move will help the state support education by helping cover the costs of getting kids to school.

Currently, school districts help pay for students' transportation needs, but a recent court ruling says state government is not doing enough to support education. That includes education-related transportation.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Another high-profile candidate says he’s interested in becoming the next Seattle mayor.  This time, it’s state Senator Ed Murray, a Democrat from Seattle.   

Port of Seattle CEO Tay Yoshitani
Flickr/ U.S.-Japan Council

The CEO of the Port of Seattle, Tay Yoshitani, can sit on the board of a private freight logistics company without creating a conflict of interest, according to an outside attorney hired by the Port of Seattle Commissioners. The attorney presented his formal opinion to the port Tuesday.

this is my caption
KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

The war of words stemming from the effort to reform the Seattle Police Department is heating up.  At issue is the selection of an independent monitor who would oversee the reforms.

The Justice Department and the city are supposed to jointly select the monitor, but city officials can't agree on whom that monitor should be.

Mayor McGinn opposes the selection of a Los Angeles police consultant named Merrick Bobb, who has been described as being one of the country’s preeminent police reform experts. McGinn said he had questions about whether Bobb would be fair.

King County Primary Ballot
(Flickr photo/Brian Daniel Eisenberg)

Washington state’s online voter registration system is vulnerable to hackers, according to The New York Times.  

The newspaper said it took less than three minutes to get the information it needed to access the registrations of some unnamed executives.

Basketball signed by the 2007 Sonics.
Justin Kraemer Photography

Story last updated by Patricia Murphy on October 15, 2012 at 3:13 p.m.

The Sodo arena plan has had a few twists and turns.  After first being unveiled in February, it was later altered by the Seattle City Council and more recently by the King County Council.

The latest iteration is scheduled to be voted on by the whole King County and Seattle City councils.

Here’s an outline of how it works:

Sodo stadiums century link safeco
Flickr Photo/SDOT Photos (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bZhk8f

The full King County Council is expected to vote on the latest Sodo arena plan next week, following some adjustments made by the council’s budget committee Tuesday.

Committee chairman Joe McDermott said the adjustments included that language that requires
improving pedestrian access to the new Sodo arena. “It could be anywhere from sidewalks to an overpass or underpass somewhere.  I want to underscore that those kinds of pedestrian improvement also assist in freight mobility,” he said.

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