Deborah Wang

Reporter

Deborah Wang is a news and feature reporter for KUOW. She covers a range of subjects, but mostly focuses on politics and government. She is also host of IN Close, the  weekly public affairs show on KCTS9.

Deborah joined the KUOW staff in the fall of 2005. She is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans close to three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Political leaders in King County want voters to help stave off drastic cuts to Metro bus service.

On Tuesday, King County Executive Dow Constantine proposed raising car tab fees, sales taxes and bus fares. The money would pay for transit service and road maintenance.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

When Brady Walkinshaw was a young child growing up in rural Whatcom County, his parents noticed he had a particular affinity for politics.

By the age of 4 or 5, “I have vivid memories of him organizing books on the floor [about] states and trying to figure out where the capitals were,” his father Charlie said.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Inauguration in Seattle has usually been a low-key affair. But not this year.

Hundreds packed the lobby of Seattle City Hall on Monday. Some came to see Ed Murray, the city’s first openly gay mayor, take the oath of office. But many more came to catch a glimpse of Kshama Sawant, Seattle’s first Socialist City Council member who has attracted international attention.

Seattle Councilwoman Kshama Sawant spearheaded rallies for a $15 minimum wage in Seattle.
KUOW File Photo/Deborah Wang

Newly-elected Councilmember Kshama Sawant is already working on her campaign promise to establish a $15 an hour minimum wage in Seattle.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Outside Amazon’s headquarters in South Lake Union on Monday, activists chanted in German, “Wir sind Menchen; nicht Roboter.”

Translation: “We are people, not robots.”  

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE 12/09/13  5:30 PM PT:

Supporters of SeaTac's $15 an hour minimum wage are celebrating tonight after the initiative survived a hand recount of ballots cast in the race.

County elections officials spent a full day scrutinizing more than 6,000 ballots by hand, closely watched by observers from both sides of the issue.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE 12/03/13 10 p.m. PT:

As expected, Democratic Party activists chose state Rep. Jamie Pedersen to replace Ed Murray in the state Senate.

Pedersen was the only candidate in the running. He vowed to work to regain the Democratic majority in the Senate and to find new revenue for essential programs.

Pedersen's move to the Senate put his House seat up for grabs.

Crosscut Photo

Local historian Knute Berger was just a kid when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Berger's parents were Republicans -- they hadn't voted for Kennedy. But for Berger, Kennedy was a kind of hero.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Construction begins this month on the long-anticipated plan to replace Seattle’s crumbling downtown seawall.

Waterfront businesses are bracing for what is likely to be three years of disruptions from the $290 million project, which was approved by voters last year.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

State Sen. Ed Murray appeared to be winning the Seattle mayoral race on Tuesday night, with 56 percent of the votes. Mayor Mike McGinn trailed with 43 percent.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

A self-declared Socialist candidate for Seattle City Council is making waves among the city’s Democratic Party establishment.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s down to the wire in the hotly contested Seattle mayor’s race.

With the public debates and forums now largely over, the campaigns have shifted to what is called the “ground game”—phone calling, doorbelling, sign waving.

Volunteers for incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn have knocked on more than 20,000 doors and made more than 150,000 phone calls so far, according to the campaign. Even though the mayor is behind in recent polls, the campaign has long claimed that it runs the superior field operation, and will make up the difference in the final days of the election.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

US Senator Patty Murray made her budget priorities clear at a Seattle food bank on Wednesday: She wants to preserve federal programs that affect the poor, such as Head Start, federal housing assistance and food stamps.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Two new polls in the Seattle mayor’s race show State Senator Ed Murray leading incumbent mayor Mike McGinn.

But the polls,which came out Monday, differ on the extent of Murray’s lead.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The TV ad wars have begun in the Seattle mayor’s race.

This week, supporters of state Senator Ed Murray are running an ad that has some women’s advocates up in arms.

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