Deborah Wang | KUOW News and Information

Deborah Wang

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Deborah Wang is a news and feature reporter for KUOW. She covers a range of subjects, but mostly focuses on politics and government. She is also host of IN Close on public television station KCTS9.

Deborah is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from more than two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. During that time, she covered the the Persian Gulf War from coalition headquarters in Saudi Arabia, and then spent many months in Kuwait, Turkey and Northern Iraq filing stories on the war's aftermath. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

Ways to Connect

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Friday’s shooting was the subtext of everything that was said during Sunday services at the Grove Church in Marysville. Pastor Andrew Munoz spoke from a podium lit with candles and littered with strips of paper containing prayers and messages for the victims of the shooting.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Zachary Werrell and Gray Delany are barely out of college, but they already enjoy a national reputation.

They were the masterminds behind Tea Party candidate David Brat's campaign against former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in Virginia. Brat, an economics professor, ousted Cantor in a June primary, in what some called the biggest political upset in US history.

Last month, after a lackluster primary finish, Republican Pedro Celis hired Werrell and Delany to come to Washington state to salvage his struggling campaign against Democrat Suzan DelBene in the 1st Congressional District.

In this extended interview, Werrell and Delany talk about Celis' politics, the importance of the ground game, and why they initially hated (and now love) the campaign's "Vote For Pedro" slogan.

For more KUOW elections coverage, visit the Election Connection page.  

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Viet Shelton and Sandeep Kaushik were two of the key players in Suzan DelBene's successful run for Congress in Washington's 1st District in 2012. This year, they are back running DelBene's re-election campaign. 

Suzan DelBene
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Voters in Washington’s 1st Congressional District will decide whether to return their freshman member of Congress to Washington, D.C. or replace her with a political unknown.

Incumbent Democrat Suzan DelBene is being challenged by Republican Pedro Celis. The two are facing off in the state’s only true partisan battleground.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

If you are a bus rider in King County, you might want to double check to make sure your bus will be running next week.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

In his first budget speech since taking office, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray laid out his priorities for the next two years, pledging a more efficient, transparent and better performing city government.

Flickr Photo/jseattle

Developers who build tiny apartments in Seattle may soon be working under a new set of city rules.

The Seattle City Council gave initial approval Tuesday to a host of new regulations that would govern everything from the minimum size of units to bicycle and car parking requirements.

construction crane
Flickr Photo/sea turtle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A construction boom and runaway hiring at Amazon are leading to stronger than expected tax revenues for the city of Seattle.

City budget officials say they expect to collect about $7 million more in taxes for 2015 and 2016.

Labor activists from the group Working Washington surround eight protesters who have linked arms in a busy Bellevue intersection Sept. 9, 2014. They were protesting for a raise in the minimum wage.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Labor activists are targeting the city of Bellevue in the battle for a $15 an hour minimum wage.

Yesterday they marched from Seattle across the I-90 bridge and staged a protest that stopped traffic in downtown Bellevue.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

It was a false countdown to high noon, when Cannabis City, a store in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood, was supposed to start selling marijuana.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE 7/2/2014, 4:51 p.m. PT: 

Forward Seattle, a group opposing Seattle’s new $15 minimum wage law, today submitted its petitions to put the law up for a popular vote.  

The Seattle City Clerk’s office says the group turned in more than 19,000 signatures. 16,510 signatures are required to put the law on the ballot. 

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle’s new $15 an hour minimum wage is scheduled to start phasing in next April. But it first must survive several challenges, both in court and at the ballot box.

Franchisees are challenging the law in court, and two separate groups are collecting signatures to put the law to a popular vote on this November’s ballot.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Last week, Seattle became the first city in the nation to establish a $15 minimum wage for all workers. The framework was established by a panel of business, labor and community leaders, which the City Council passed in record time.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

As the Seattle City Council continues to debate a plan to phase in a $15 minimum wage, and as minimum wage advocates gather signatures to put an even stronger measure on the November ballot, businesses in the city are finding themselves in an uncomfortable position: in limbo.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Non-profit human service providers Wednesday voiced concerns on Wednesday about a proposed plan to raise the minimum wage in Seattle to $15 an hour.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The end of the large-scale recovery operation at the site of the Oso mudslide means that a road around the slide zone, once reserved for emergency vehicles, will be open for traffic.

State transportation officials opened the new detour, a primitive gravel road on Seattle City Light property, Monday night for local traffic.

Active Search Efforts End In Oso Mudslide

Apr 28, 2014
Flickr Photo/Snohomish County (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This morning, Snohomish County Sheriff Ty Trenary announced the end of active search operations at the site of the March 22 mudslide near Oso, Wash.

Trenary said it was a difficult decision to make and relied on “a little bit of soul searching and a lot of information from the scene.”

Demonstrators in Seattle form a human chain around City Hall in support of a $15 minimum wage in April 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is expected to announce his proposal for a minimum wage increase Thursday afternoon after his advisory committee was unable to reach a consensus.

Courtesy Alpine Ascents International

Last Friday’s avalanche on Mount Everest was especially devastating for one Seattle-based mountaineering company.

Of the 16 Sherpa guides killed, five of them were employees of Alpine Ascents International.

KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

It’s no secret that Western Washington is prone to landslides. The combination of glacial soils, steep slopes and water creates a risk that’s greater than in other parts of the U.S.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

You may see fewer cars with pink mustaches on the road in the coming months.

Seattle’s City Council yesterday gave final approval to a plan that would limit the number of cars that rideshare companies like Lyft, UberX and Sidecar can operate.

KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

The push to raise the minimum wage in Seattle was just a campaign slogan last fall. But now it's on a fast track. Mayor Ed Murray has said that he will propose a minimum wage increase this spring.

But many of the people who would be affected are just starting to assess the costs and benefits.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Hundreds of people descended on Seattle's Town Hall last night for the first in a series of public hearings on the minimum wage.

Flickr Photo/Scott Beale (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marijuana growers who want to sell their products in Seattle will have to pay business license tax to the city.

On Monday, the City Council voted not to give pot growers a tax break reserved for farmers.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Residents of Seattle should know in the next few months whether low-wage workers in the city will get a raise. Mayor Ed Murray is hoping to unveil a proposal by late spring that would increase the minimum wage in the city to as much as $15 an hour.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

Customers of Seattle City Light are likely to see an increase in their bills later this year.

The utility is facing lower than expected revenues, and that could mean an automatic 3 percent surcharge for customers.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Munincipal Archives

You may have noticed that water levels at Lake Washington beaches are very low.

But if you think there might be some connection with the drought that is now gripping much of the western U.S., think again.

Courtesy of World Vision

While football fans are eagerly watching the Super Bowl, stores and manufacturers will be likewise poised for the final outcome to set in motion a landslide of merchandise to cater to the winners.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Political leaders in King County want voters to help stave off drastic cuts to Metro bus service.

On Tuesday, King County Executive Dow Constantine proposed raising car tab fees, sales taxes and bus fares. The money would pay for transit service and road maintenance.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

When Brady Walkinshaw was a young child growing up in rural Whatcom County, his parents noticed he had a particular affinity for politics.

By the age of 4 or 5, “I have vivid memories of him organizing books on the floor [about] states and trying to figure out where the capitals were,” his father Charlie said.

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