Deborah Wang

Reporter

Deborah Wang is a news and feature reporter for KUOW. She covers a range of subjects, but mostly focuses on politics and government. She is also host of IN Close, the  weekly public affairs show on KCTS9.

Deborah joined the KUOW staff in the fall of 2005. She is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans close to three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Democrat Suzan DelBene cruised to an easy victory in her first re-election bid in the state’s 1st Congressional District.

At last count, DelBene is leading Republican challenger Pedro Celis 55 to 44 percent.

Deborah Wang / KUOW

The chain link fence at the front gate of Marysville-Pilchuck High School has become an unofficial gathering spot for those in grief. They bring bouquets of flowers and hang them on the fence, they tie on balloons, and they put up posters with the names and photographs not just of the victims, but also of the alleged shooter.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Friday’s shooting was the subtext of everything that was said during Sunday services at the Grove Church in Marysville. Pastor Andrew Munoz spoke from a podium lit with candles and littered with strips of paper containing prayers and messages for the victims of the shooting.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Zachary Werrell and Gray Delany are barely out of college, but they already enjoy a national reputation.

They were the masterminds behind Tea Party candidate David Brat's campaign against former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in Virginia. Brat, an economics professor, ousted Cantor in a June primary, in what some called the biggest political upset in US history.

Last month, after a lackluster primary finish, Republican Pedro Celis hired Werrell and Delany to come to Washington state to salvage his struggling campaign against Democrat Suzan DelBene in the 1st Congressional District.

In this extended interview, Werrell and Delany talk about Celis' politics, the importance of the ground game, and why they initially hated (and now love) the campaign's "Vote For Pedro" slogan.

For more KUOW elections coverage, visit the Election Connection page.  

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Viet Shelton and Sandeep Kaushik were two of the key players in Suzan DelBene's successful run for Congress in Washington's 1st District in 2012. This year, they are back running DelBene's re-election campaign. 

Suzan DelBene
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Voters in Washington’s 1st Congressional District will decide whether to return their freshman member of Congress to Washington, D.C. or replace her with a political unknown.

Incumbent Democrat Suzan DelBene is being challenged by Republican Pedro Celis. The two are facing off in the state’s only true partisan battleground.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

If you are a bus rider in King County, you might want to double check to make sure your bus will be running next week.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

In his first budget speech since taking office, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray laid out his priorities for the next two years, pledging a more efficient, transparent and better performing city government.

Flickr Photo/jseattle

Developers who build tiny apartments in Seattle may soon be working under a new set of city rules.

The Seattle City Council gave initial approval Tuesday to a host of new regulations that would govern everything from the minimum size of units to bicycle and car parking requirements.

construction crane
Flickr Photo/sea turtle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A construction boom and runaway hiring at Amazon are leading to stronger than expected tax revenues for the city of Seattle.

City budget officials say they expect to collect about $7 million more in taxes for 2015 and 2016.

Labor activists from the group Working Washington surround eight protesters who have linked arms in a busy Bellevue intersection Sept. 9, 2014. They were protesting for a raise in the minimum wage.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Labor activists are targeting the city of Bellevue in the battle for a $15 an hour minimum wage.

Yesterday they marched from Seattle across the I-90 bridge and staged a protest that stopped traffic in downtown Bellevue.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

It was a false countdown to high noon, when Cannabis City, a store in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood, was supposed to start selling marijuana.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE 7/2/2014, 4:51 p.m. PT: 

Forward Seattle, a group opposing Seattle’s new $15 minimum wage law, today submitted its petitions to put the law up for a popular vote.  

The Seattle City Clerk’s office says the group turned in more than 19,000 signatures. 16,510 signatures are required to put the law on the ballot. 

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle’s new $15 an hour minimum wage is scheduled to start phasing in next April. But it first must survive several challenges, both in court and at the ballot box.

Franchisees are challenging the law in court, and two separate groups are collecting signatures to put the law to a popular vote on this November’s ballot.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Last week, Seattle became the first city in the nation to establish a $15 minimum wage for all workers. The framework was established by a panel of business, labor and community leaders, which the City Council passed in record time.

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