Deborah Wang | KUOW News and Information

Deborah Wang

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Deborah Wang is a news and feature reporter for KUOW. She covers a range of subjects, but mostly focuses on politics and government. She is also host of IN Close on public television station KCTS9.

Deborah is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from more than two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. During that time, she covered the the Persian Gulf War from coalition headquarters in Saudi Arabia, and then spent many months in Kuwait, Turkey and Northern Iraq filing stories on the war's aftermath. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

Ways to Connect

Seattle Sounders midfielder Alvaro Fernandez plays at Century Link Field in Seattle on October 23, 2016.Seattle Sounders midfielder Alvaro Fernandez plays at Century Link Field in Seattle on October 23, 2016.
Flickr Photo/Jim Culp (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/MT8Zb7

Deborah Wang talks to Steve Clare, owner and editor of the soccer news site Prost Amerika, about the Seattle Sounders chances as they head to Toronto for the MLS Cup on Saturday.

Braedon Wilkerson, Olga Farnam and Manis Pierre were all involved with the state GOP this year. Their views on Trump differ widely
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Deborah Wang speaks with Washington State Republican Party chair Susan Hutchison. She also speaks with Olga Farnam, Manis Pierre and Braedon Wilkerson.

Newspaper box for the Seattle Times, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Mr.TinDC (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://bit.ly/2gKCGU9

“It’s not at all surprising.” That was the reaction by David Boardman to the announcement by the Seattle Times that it will be reducing staff. The newspaper told staff in an email that it will be offering buyouts with the potential of layoffs after that.

State Democratic Party Chair Jaxon Ravens predicts strong caucus turnout, but shy of the record set in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Deborah Wang speaks with Washington state Democratic Party chairman Jaxon Ravens about the future of the party. She also speaks with Jessa Lewis, Alec Stephens and Tamborine Borrelli.

Deborah Wang speaks with Jim Camden, Olympia bureau chief for the Spokesman Review, about a proposal by two Republican state representatives to break off eastern Washington into its own state, separate from us here on the west side. They want to name the new state Liberty.

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Deborah Wang speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a changing of the guard in the White House and what Canada is doing to prepare for the Trump administration.

A march protesting the Seattle police shooting of Che Taylor on Feb. 21 moves through downtown Seattle on Feb. 25, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Deborah Wang speaks with Jeff Robinson, about the possibility of changing Washington state law that protects law enforcement officers involved in a deadly shooting. The law currently states that police officers can only be convicted of the shooting if it is proved they acted with "malice" and with a lack of "good faith." Those are the most protective standards in the country. Robinson believes the law unfairly shields police from prosecution. Robinson is deputy legal director and director of the Trone Center for Justice and Equality at the ACLU. Wang also spoke with Craig Bulkley, president of the Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs, about why he believes the law should stay the way it is written. Bulkley , who is also a law enforcement officer in Spokane, says there is no evidence that police are hiding behind the word "malice." A legislative task force is expected to make a recommendation on how the state law should be changed.

Deborah Wang talks to Erik Vance about his book, "Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain's Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal."

Republican candidates for Washington State Treasurer Duane Davidson and Michael Waite.
KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

Washington's treasurer is like the state’s banker. The office managed more than $408 billion in cash last year. And the two candidates for that office have very different ideas about what to do with all that money, and the office itself.

Paul Graves, Republican candidate in the 5th Legislative District, speaks with Jackie Treadwell on her porch in Maple Valley.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s not hard to see what Republicans in Western Washington are up against this year. State House candidate Paul Graves runs into it at Jackie Treadwell’s door in Maple Valley. “Are you a Democrat or a Republican?” asks Treadwell.

Natasha Marin is the creator of the Reparations project.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Natasha Marin is a Seattle artist who noticed a divide on her Facebook feed: Her black friends were angry and frustrated about police shootings of black men, and her white friends were saying they wanted to help but didn’t know what to do. “There is a discrepancy in the lives of people of color and white-identified people in the United States,” Marin said. Marin put together the Reparations site and accompanying Facebook event . It was a place where people of color could post needs, and white people could help meet those needs.

'If, for my birthday dinner, I could order anything I wanted, I'd request a Maine lobster or a tarantula spider. ' - David George Gordon
Courtesy of Chugrad McAndrews

Deborah Wang speaks with Seattleite David George Gordon, author of the " Eat-a-Bug Cookbook ," about his favorite insects to eat and why. Plus: what he serves to trick-or-treaters at Halloween. Want to get started with entomophagy? See Gordon's recipe for deep-fried tarantulas. Or head over to Central Co-op in Seattle to pick up some crickets.

Habtamu Abdi, the Seattle Police Department's East African Community Liaison
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Seattle is home to one of the nation's largest East African communities. An estimated 25,000 East Africans live in King County, according to the 2014 American Community Survey. It's a community that consists of mostly recent immigrants and refugees from countries like Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea.

Alaskan Way viaduct, Seattle waterfront, downtown
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Deborah Wang talks with Initiative 123 backer Kate Martin and opponent Patrick Gordon about whether Seattle should build a waterfront view park along Alaskan Way — and potentially scrap its existing waterfront plans in the process.

Alissa Wehrman and Eula Scott Bynoe.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

High-profile killings of black men at the hands of police, as well as shootings of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge, prompted Eula Scott Bynoe to organize a public discussion with white people about race.

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