Deborah Wang

Reporter

Deborah Wang is a news and feature reporter for KUOW. She covers a range of subjects, but mostly focuses on politics and government. She is also host of IN Close, the  weekly public affairs show on KCTS9.

Deborah joined the KUOW staff in the fall of 2005. She is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans close to three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

A lawsuit against Seattle’s new $15 an hour minimum wage has failed its first test in court.

Lawyers for the International Franchise Association (IFA) and five local franchisees have sued the city, arguing the law discriminates against franchise businesses.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Researchers from the University of Washington and the state are hoping cold, hard data can help settle the heated debate over the costs and benefits of raising the minimum wage in Seattle.

Workers and labor activists demonstrate outside the US District Courthouse in support of the city's $15 an hour minimum wage
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Lawyers for the International Franchise Association and five local franchisees were in court Tuesday asking that portions of Seattle’s new $15-an-hour minimum wage law be barred from taking effect.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Lawyers for the city of Seattle will be in federal court Tuesday to defend the city’s new $15-an-hour minimum wage law.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

As the Woodland Park Zoo searches for a new home for its two Asian elephants, newly obtained public documents reveal an extensive behind-the-scenes campaign by city officials to pressure the zoo to send the elephants to a sanctuary.

Stunned Seahawks fans at Altstadt in Pioneer Square watch as Seahawks go down to defeat in Sunday’s Superbowl.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

In Seattle after the game, fans poured out onto the streets near the CenturyLink Field, trying to understand how the game took a turn for the worse.

File photo. apartment housing apt door
Flickr Photo/Matthew Piatt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

If you are looking for more evidence of a housing crisis in King County, here it is.

Officials at the King County Housing Authority report a flood of people applying for federal housing assistance.

On Wednesday, after a four year hiatus, the authority once again began accepting applications for the federal Housing Choice Voucher Program, more commonly called Section 8.

Demonstrators in Seattle form a human chain around City Hall in support of a $15 minimum wage in April 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle starts phasing in a higher minimum wage on April 1 this year. The key term here is "phasing in." Everyone receiving the minimum wage won’t immediately get $15 an hour.

KUOW’s Deborah Wang sat down with Ross Reynolds to explain.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Woodland Park Zoo officials are looking for a new home for their two remaining elephants.

Last month, they announced they would close their exhibit and send their two female Asian elephants, 35-year-old Chai and 47-year-old Bamboo, to another zoo to be part of a larger social herd.

“It’s going to be a bit of a match.com, just in terms of personalities,” said Nancy Hawkes, Woodland Park Zoo’s general curator. 

KUOW reporter Deborah Wang asked native Washingtonians if they believe they have an accent. They said no. But they also pronounced "caught" and "cot" the same way -- one of the subtle distinctions of this region's accent.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Do Pacific Northwesterners have an accent and what does it sound like? Listener Molly in Tacoma asked that question as part of KUOW's Local Wonder series. 

Molly never thought she had an accent until she moved to Virginia and was told she had one.

Some regional accents are obvious. But many in the Pacific Northwest describe themselves as speaking “standard,” “normal,” or “plain” English. But is that really the case? What do the experts say?

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Several hundred demonstrators gathered outside Seattle’s CenturyLink Field Sunday just as the Seahawks game against the San Francisco 49ers was getting underway. The crowd chanted "Twelfth man can't breathe! Twelfth man can't breathe!" They were protesting recent police shootings of unarmed black civilians in Ferguson and elsewhere.

Bamboo, one of two elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, will be leaving with Chai.
Flickr Photo/Cara_VSAngel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle’s elephants are leaving town to join another herd.

The Woodland Park Zoo announced on Wednesday that it will close its elephant exhibit and send its only two elephants, Chai and Bamboo, to another zoo.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

In 2005, housing advocates in King County announced a plan to end homelessness within a decade.

Since then, the community has produced 5,600 units of permanent housing for the homeless, more than anywhere in the U.S. except New York and Los Angeles. This year alone, more than 2,000 formerly homeless people have moved into permanent housing.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Democrat Suzan DelBene cruised to an easy victory in her first re-election bid in the state’s 1st Congressional District.

At last count, DelBene is leading Republican challenger Pedro Celis 55 to 44 percent.

Deborah Wang / KUOW

The chain link fence at the front gate of Marysville-Pilchuck High School has become an unofficial gathering spot for those in grief. They bring bouquets of flowers and hang them on the fence, they tie on balloons, and they put up posters with the names and photographs not just of the victims, but also of the alleged shooter.

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