David Hyde | KUOW News and Information

David Hyde

Reporter and Interviewer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a reporter and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create balanced radio that matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Harvard Medical School Photo

George Church says scientists may one day be able to resurrect wooly mammoths and use bacteria to make cups or grow houses. David Hyde discusses the science with professor George Church.

AP Photo/Frank Franklin II

David Hyde talks to Dan Schrag, a geology professor at Harvard University, who also serves on President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology about climate change and weather.

Does Hell Exist?

Oct 28, 2012

The new documentary "Hellbound" looks at the emerging debate among evangelical Christians about whether hell exists.  Filmmaker Kevin Miller interviews a variety of people for the movie including Seattle evangelical pastor Mark Driscoll of the Mars Hill Church.

glee fan
Flickr/kurichan+

The faces (and characterizations) you see on TV are changing: The number of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender characters on primetime series is on the rise, but representation of Hispanics has decreased.

How far ahead of (or behind) the cultural curve is TV?  Pop culture expert and communications professor Robert Thompson evaluates the fall line-up.

When Carver Clark Gayton was growing up in Seattle in the 1940s he didn’t hear anything about African-American history in school. But his mother told him stories, including one about his great-grandfather Lewis George Clarke.

Clarke was an escaped slave and an abolitionist. His personal story found its way into the anti-slavery novel "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" that went on to become the second most popular book in the 19th century. It’s seen as one of the causes of the Civil War.

The Seattle City Council recently passed a new law requiring property inspections on tenant properties.  How will the new law affect you? 

Evan Loeffler is a real estate attorney whose practice emphasizes landlord-tenant relations. He explains the new law and answers your questions about tenants’ rights, landlords’ rights, and how to handle disputes.

UW Professor David Montgomery says he'll march for science
Kvasir Society Photo/Joy Mathew

There are many stories of great floods out there, first and foremost the fable of Noah's ark. But some geologists have found that many of these legends have some basis in historical fact. We talk with University of Washington professor and MacArthur award-winner Dave Montgomery, the author of "The Rocks Don't Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah's Flood."

The two women behind the Seattle rock band Heart, Nancy and Ann Wilson, have a new biography out. It's written with the help of music biographer Charles R. Cross. It's called, "Kicking And Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul And Rock and Roll." Charles R. Cross joins us.

You may have already received your state voter's pamphlet in the mail. How much do you trust the candidate's statements?

We talk to Shane Hamlin, elections co-director for the Office of the Secretary of State, about a controversial statement by a candidate for King County Superior Court.

Stacy London
AP Photo/Peter Kramer

Stacy London believes that personal style matters, and she’s made a career of coaching people on how to look their best. As a co-host of the TV show What Not To Wear and a fashion consultant for various media outlets, London stresses that style is more about feeling great than wearing the hottest trends.


She turns the mirror on herself in her new book, “The Truth About Style,” and shares some truths behind her personal style.  
 

"The Truth About Style" Book Promotion

Randy Dorn
(AP Photo/John Froschauer, File)

Washington lawmakers have a mandate from the State Supreme Court to fully fund basic K-12 education.  State School Superintendent Randy Dorn says that will cost taxpayers an additional $4.1 billion per year.

Dorn’s running unopposed for a second term as Superintendent of Public Instruction.  He joins David Hyde to talk about school funding, the debate over charter schools and other issues in education.    
 

KCTS 9 is releasing a new Washington Poll today on the major races and issues on November’s ballot. David Hyde breaks down the numbers and what they mean with University of Washington political science professor, Matt Barreto.

Why Have Kids?

Oct 17, 2012

Feminist author and blogger Jessica Valenti takes a critical look at motherhood in her new book, "Why Have Kids?" Valenti talks with David Hyde about the pros and cons of raising kids in the 21st century and listeners weigh in.

Don't Know Much About the American Presidents book cover
dontknowmuch.com/

The presidential debates are a major factor in this year’s race for the White House. When did the debates become such a big deal? 

Historian Kenneth Davis tells us the story of America’s presidential debates and talks about his new book, "Don’t Know Much About The American Presidents."

election party napkins
Flickr Photo/LaMenta3 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Although the governor’s race is receiving the most press coverage this year, it’s not the only battle for control of state government.  Republicans think they have a chance to win control of the state Senate for the first time in a decade. Democrats also hope to increase their majority. 

Chris Grygiel, the Washington state news editor for the Associated Press, joins us with an inside look at how the parties are stacking up.

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