David Hyde

Contributing Reporter, Interviewer, And Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a contributing producer and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create radio that really matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Germaine J. Kornegay is the first black city council member for Sedro-Wolley, a small town north of Seattle. Although she supported Barack Obama in 2008, she now supports Hillary Clinton.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Germaine J. Kornegay is the only black city council member for Sedro-Woolley, a tiny timber town about an hour north of Seattle.


Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

If you're a Republican, you may gotten your ballot and thought to yourself, "Why bother filling that out? I mean, Donald Trump is the last candidate standing. He's assured of getting the nomination, right?"


Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Donald Trump is the apparent GOP nominee. And here in Washington state, Republicans are deeply divided about the pick and uncertain about the future of the party. 

Trump and his supporters are triumphant, but the reaction among some Washington state Republicans is a lot less enthusiastic, like former Attorney General Rob McKenna.

Charles Adkins, 18, is running to be a delegate for Bernie Sanders at the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Just before Bernie Sanders took the stage at a packed Key Arena in March, the Seattle crowd heard a new voice in Washington state politics: Charles Adkins. 

He's a Native American high school student who used to be homeless. 

In this March 10, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, right, speaks as Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, listens, during a Republican presidential debate.
AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File

Governor John Kasich and Senator Ted Cruz have joined forces to try and stop Donald Trump, sort of. 

They've struck a deal to not compete in three states: Kasich will not campaign in Indiana and Cruz will not campaign in New Mexico or Oregon. But the truce ends at the Washington state line.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich picked up some endorsements in Washington state, but he distantly trails the front-runners in the race for the GOP nomination.
Courtesy John Kasich campaign

Ohio Governor John Kasich is getting some love from Republican leaders heading into next month's presidential primary here in Washington state.

David Hyde talks to author Bryan Burrough about his book, "Days Of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence." It's about a far-left movement in the 1960s and 70s to overthrow the U.S. government in the "second American Revolution."

Pramila Jayapal
Flickr Photo/Joe Mabel (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/zznt82

Bill Radke speaks with state Sen. Pramila Jayapal about a state plan to proactively review all ethnically and racially offensive geographic names in Washington state.

Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/6FfQtk

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Dina Bass about Microsoft's chat bot that (she says) will not lead to a new race of robot Terminators that try to destroy humans.  

Bernie Sanders supporters packed UW's Hec Edmundson Pavilion on Saturday, Aug. 8, 2015 to hear him speak.
Flickr Photo/Hollywata (CC BY ND 2.0)

Bill Radke speaks with political scientist Megan Ming Francis about why Bernie Sander's message appeals more here in Washington than in other states and what that means for the future of the Democratic Party. 

A still from Chris Morgan's short movie about grizzly bears.
grizzlybearfilm.org

If you feel like you're just waking up from a long winter, you're not alone. Bears feel the same way. And they're out and about in the North Cascades.

Chelsea and Bill Clinton in 2008.
Flickr Photo/PBS NewsHour (CC BY-NC 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/4U6Que

Chelsea Clinton speaks with Bill Radke about why Hillary Clinton wants your vote.

David Hyde speaks with reporter Molly O'Toole about the key differences between Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders when it comes to foreign policy. O'Toole covers politics and foreign policy for Foreign Policy Magazine. 

Actress Susan Sarandon, left, and Jane Sanders, wife of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), at a dinner in Las Vegas, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016.
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Bill Radke speaks with Jane Sanders about why her spouse Bernie Sanders is the right presidential candidate for Washington state voters. 

Blue Origin team members Bretton Alexander and Jeff Ashby, founder Jeff Bezos, NASA deputy administrator Lori Garver, and team members Rob Meyerson and Robert Millman at the company’s headquarters in Kent in 2011.
Flickr Photo/NASA HQ Photo (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/aSA5N4

Bill Radke interviews reporter Alan Boyle about his recent tour of Blue Origin -- the Jeff Bezos' space tourism and rocket factory that opened its doors to reporters for the first time this week.  

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