David Hyde | KUOW News and Information

David Hyde

Reporter and Interviewer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a reporter and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create balanced radio that matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

marsmet481 / Flickr

Both state and federal lawmakers have been debating over how to approach immigration reform. Immigrants themselves tend to favor paths to citizenship and educational opportunities for their children. But how do non-immigrants formulate their opinions on the subject? A recent academic study says that maybe our genes play a key role in shaping our political views. According to the research, people with a predisposition to social anxiety and fear are more likely to be critical of the unfamiliar and therefore more likely to support things like anti-immigration policy. David Hyde talks to lead author and political science professor Pete Hatemi to get the details.

John Shearer/Invision/AP

David Hyde talks with Frank Rich about the historical significance of Quentin Tarantino’s "Django Unchained" and why Rich thinks it deserves to win an Academy Award for best picture. Then he turns to historian Sean Wilentz who thinks it is not "Django Unchained" but Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" that is the historically accurate and significant film that deserves the Oscar.

Fetmano / Flickr

State toxicologist Fiona Couper recently stated that violations for driving under the influence of marijuana have not gone up since the passage of Initiative-502. But marijuana legalization is still in its early stages and to be charged with a DUI the driver has to get caught with 5 nanograms per milliliter of active THC in their bloodstream. David Hyde talks with Dr. Marilyn Huestis from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and tries to make sense of the science of marijuana intoxication.  

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

  Here are five programs we did in 2012 that I loved. Each is an interview about a Seattle person. And they all have big, bold personalities. Who knew?

1. Who Is Nancy Pearl? 

You’ve heard librarian Nancy Pearl share her picks for great books and stories on NPR and KUOW. But what is Nancy Pearl’s own story? What does she do when she’s NOT reading books? Much is revealed when she sits down with Ross Reynolds.

2. Who Is David Brewster? 

Bebeto Matthews / AP Photo

You think you know him: red suit, white beard, jolly old elf, etc. But do you why St. Nicholas became the Patron Saint Of Prisoners? David Hyde talks with Adam English, author of "The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus: The True Life And Trials Of Nicholas Of Myra."

Top 5 Holiday Cocktails

Dec 24, 2012
aya padron / Flickr

The weather outside is frightful, so why not curl up by the fire with a nice holiday cocktail? David Hyde talks to veteran bartender Kristen Naranjo about her favorite holiday cocktails.

Some people believe the world is ending today (and they are completely wrong about that). But let’s say today really is your last day on Earth. How would you want to spend it?  It’s kind of like your one day bucket list.  We’ll hear from listeners and special guests including John Moe, formerly of KUOW and now host of Wits

NAC Architecture

Designing safer schools doesn't mean turning them into military bunkers. That might have been an easy remodel back when schools were built like jails, filled with "cells" and controlled by bells. Today's schools are open, flexible spaces that allow students to combine and recombine into groups that learn from each other as much as they learn from the teacher.

Sugar pills in a case
Flickr Photo/pig pog s

Before 1970, doctors used to lie to their patients all the time. They knew that some hypochondriacs became noticeably better when doctors gave them a sugar pill.

This was called "the placebo effect." After 1970, we thought of placebos differently. Researchers decided that for a drug to be deemed effective, it had to outperform a placebo. But we never stepped back and took a good hard look at the placebo and why it worked.

Laszlo Ilyes / Flickr

Hanukkah has come to a close, and Christmas and Kwanzaa are still on the way. These are the three we hear about, but how do you celebrate the holidays? David Hyde takes calls from listeners and hears what the holiday season means to Seattle.

Oregon Zoo, Michael Durham / AP Photo

Critics of Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo say that the elephants there are not being treated well and that they don’t do well in captivity. Defenders say zoos are key to global conservation efforts. Should zoos, including Woodland Park, continue to display elephants?

David Hyde talks with Carter Roberts, president and CEO of the World Wildlife Fund, University of Guelph researcher Georgia Mason who has studied elephants in zoos, and Michael Berens, the investigative reporter for the Seattle Times who has written about the Woodland Park Zoo.

Why do most people love animals they consider cute, like puppies or panda bears, but they don’t have a lot of love for animals they consider ugly, like naked mole rats? Western Carolina University Psychology professor Hal Herzog explores the paradoxical relationship people have with animals in a new book, "Some we love, some we hate, some we eat: Why it’s so hard to think straight about animals."

UltraSlo1 / Flickr

According to a new study nearly 1 in 3 pedestrians is distracted by a mobile device like a smart phone when walking into high-risk intersections. Only 1 in 4 looked both ways before crossing the street.  

David Hyde talks with Dr. Beth Ebel who was the lead author on the study. She directs the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research center at the University of Washington.

Seattle writer Domingo Martinez is the author of "The Boy Kings Of Texas," which was recently nominated for the National Book Award.  It’s about the cultural tensions he experienced growing up in the border town of Brownsville.  

KUOW's David Hyde talks to Martinez about growing up in a border town, his family, why he moved to Seattle, and why he stayed. 

The psychopath Hannibal Lecter in the movie "Silence of the Lambs" is ruthless.  But he’s also charming, persuasive and highly intelligent.  Cambridge psychology professor Kevin Dutton says when psychopaths don’t turn violent they can become very successful as CEOs, surgeons, or in other professions. His latest book is "The Wisdom Of Psychopaths."

“The apple never falls far from the tree,” the saying goes. But what happens when it does? Our guest today tells the stories of children whose identities are very different from their parents, such as dwarfs who are born to parents of average stature.  How do parents and children navigate these differences?  And what do these children have in common?

Sad pie
Flickr photo/ Kevin McShane

Your mom despises turkey, your uncle hates ham.  Your brother’s vegan, and your sister is allergic to pumpkin pie.  What do you do about the picky eaters (and people with dietary restrictions) at Thanksgiving?  David Hyde talks to the host of The Splendid Table, Lynne Rossetto Kasper.   

Ed Murray
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

State Senator Ed Murray is the new majority leader of the Washington state senate.  But he faces some tough challenges, including a $900 million budget hole, a Supreme Court ruling that requires full funding for basic K-12 education and a possible rebellion by conservative Democrats.  David Hyde sits down with State Senator Ed Murray and asks, What's next? 

umbrella
Flickr photo/ enggul

A series of Pacific storms will pass over Western Washington throughout this holiday week. The storms will bring heavy rain to the Seattle area and inches of snow and avalanche warnings to the mountains. David Hyde checks in with state and local officials about what we can anticipate over the next few days, and how to best plan your holiday travel.

Gene Robinson was the first openly gay bishop in a major Christian denomination. We’ll hear his personal story and find out why he thinks Christian critics of same-sex marriage are misreading the Bible.

Harvard Medical School Photo

George Church says scientists may one day be able to resurrect wooly mammoths and use bacteria to make cups or grow houses. David Hyde discusses the science with professor George Church.

AP Photo/Frank Franklin II

David Hyde talks to Dan Schrag, a geology professor at Harvard University, who also serves on President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology about climate change and weather.

Does Hell Exist?

Oct 28, 2012

The new documentary "Hellbound" looks at the emerging debate among evangelical Christians about whether hell exists.  Filmmaker Kevin Miller interviews a variety of people for the movie including Seattle evangelical pastor Mark Driscoll of the Mars Hill Church.

glee fan
Flickr/kurichan+

The faces (and characterizations) you see on TV are changing: The number of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender characters on primetime series is on the rise, but representation of Hispanics has decreased.

How far ahead of (or behind) the cultural curve is TV?  Pop culture expert and communications professor Robert Thompson evaluates the fall line-up.

When Carver Clark Gayton was growing up in Seattle in the 1940s he didn’t hear anything about African-American history in school. But his mother told him stories, including one about his great-grandfather Lewis George Clarke.

Clarke was an escaped slave and an abolitionist. His personal story found its way into the anti-slavery novel "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" that went on to become the second most popular book in the 19th century. It’s seen as one of the causes of the Civil War.

The Seattle City Council recently passed a new law requiring property inspections on tenant properties.  How will the new law affect you? 

Evan Loeffler is a real estate attorney whose practice emphasizes landlord-tenant relations. He explains the new law and answers your questions about tenants’ rights, landlords’ rights, and how to handle disputes.

UW Professor David Montgomery says he'll march for science
Kvasir Society Photo/Joy Mathew

There are many stories of great floods out there, first and foremost the fable of Noah's ark. But some geologists have found that many of these legends have some basis in historical fact. We talk with University of Washington professor and MacArthur award-winner Dave Montgomery, the author of "The Rocks Don't Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah's Flood."

The two women behind the Seattle rock band Heart, Nancy and Ann Wilson, have a new biography out. It's written with the help of music biographer Charles R. Cross. It's called, "Kicking And Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul And Rock and Roll." Charles R. Cross joins us.

You may have already received your state voter's pamphlet in the mail. How much do you trust the candidate's statements?

We talk to Shane Hamlin, elections co-director for the Office of the Secretary of State, about a controversial statement by a candidate for King County Superior Court.

Stacy London
AP Photo/Peter Kramer

Stacy London believes that personal style matters, and she’s made a career of coaching people on how to look their best. As a co-host of the TV show What Not To Wear and a fashion consultant for various media outlets, London stresses that style is more about feeling great than wearing the hottest trends.


She turns the mirror on herself in her new book, “The Truth About Style,” and shares some truths behind her personal style.  
 

"The Truth About Style" Book Promotion

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