David Hyde | KUOW News and Information

David Hyde

Reporter and Interviewer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a reporter and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create balanced radio that matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/kindagetmego

The Affordable Care Act, colloquially called Obamacare, is here. Washington's health insurance marketplace, Healthplanfinder, is set to open Tuesday morning. In the marketplace, users can find, compare and sign up for health insurance. How does it work and what information will you need? David Hyde talks with Washington Health Benefit Exchange's director of communications, Michael Marchand.

The new fiscal year starts October 1, so a bill to fund the government must be passed by both chambers in Congress and signed by Obama by midnight tonight. Republicans blame Democrats and Democrats blame Republicans about the current stalemate.

According to Chris Vance, there is more than enough blame to go around. Vance is the former Republican Party state chairman for Washington and the co-chair of the Washington chapter of the Campaign to Fix the Debt. He joins David Hyde to discuss negotiations, or the lack thereof, by both parties in our government.

Brain scans
Flickr Photo/David Foltz

Earlier this month, a University of Washington researcher was able to send a brain signal over the internet to control the hand motions of a fellow researcher.  What do emerging brain technologies mean for the future of privacy and identity?  Sara Goering joins us with some answers – and some questions.  She’s a professor of philosophy at the UW and she leads the ethics thrust at the UW Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering.

Flickr Photo/binw.marketing

The fiscal year ends September 30 and without a budget agreement before that the government could face a shutdown. We’ve heard the threat many times before and you may not be taking it seriously. But whether or not the shutdown occurs, government agencies are spending time and tax dollars now preparing for the shutdown-apocalypse.

Joining us with a look at how the planning process is affecting one federal agency here in Seattle is Jenny Durkan. She's the US attorney for the Western District of Washington.

Flickr Photo/ghindo

It has been one year since the city of Seattle implemented its mandatory sick leave law. The ordinance is meant to establish standards for paid sick days and ensure that employers provide a minimum amount of paid time off for employees. So how is the law working out for employers? The Seattle City Council has commissioned a University of Washington study to evaluate the law.

Jennifer Romich, an associate professor in the school of social work at UW has been leading the research, she just released the results from a series of interviews conducted with 24 employer and spoke with David Hyde about her findings.

From "Happy Days" to "That '70s Show," TV writers love to tap into viewer nostalgia. This week ABC premieres "The Goldbergs" about a middle-class family living "in a simpler time called the '80s."

But Princeton University history professor Julian Zelizer says that suburban America during the Reagan years was anything but simple. He talks with David Hyde about the political changes that took place outside the home and continue to shape us today.

Do We Love Robots Too Much?

Sep 25, 2013
Flickr Photo/Marion Doss

You don't have to look further than the film industry to see evidence that humans find robots cute or even lovable (think "WALL-E" or R2D2 from "Star Wars"). That affection for robots is what got University of Washington researcher Julie Carpenter interested in attachment to robots in the battlefield.

Carpenter interviewed an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit, a group of highly trained soldiers who use robots to disarm explosives. David Hyde talks with Carpenter about her findings and how human-robot attachment could affect battlefield decisions.

Seattle Businesswoman Helps Syrian Refugees

Sep 24, 2013
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

There are now more than two million Syrian refugees and some local nonprofits are working to help them. Rita Zawaideh is a Seattle businesswoman who travels to Jordan every other month to bring refugees medical supplies. She started the nonprofit Salaam Cultural Museum in Seattle in 1996.

She recently returned from one of those trips. She and other volunteers saw thousands of patients and handed out hundreds of pounds of medicine.

"Masters of Sex'" Facebook page.

Even in the age of Hulu, Netflix and movies on your phone, fall still means new shows on television. IMDb TV editor Melanie McFarland recommends three new shows in the fall schedule worth checking out.

Flickr Photo/Trevor McGoldrick

From de-funding Obamacare to deep cuts to food stamps, the House of Representatives is full of big ideas that are likely going nowhere politically with Democrats who control the Senate and the White House. How then do they get so much attention? David Hyde talks with Andrea Seabrook of DecodeDC.

Flickr Photo/anqa

In the global fight against HIV/AIDS, there's some very good news. According to a new report from the United Nations, the number of new HIV infections are down by nearly one-third over the last decade. Among children new infections are down 52 percent. The number of AIDS-related deaths are also down.

What are the major factors driving this progress? And what barriers still need to be overcome? Katrina Ortblad is a researcher at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. She talks with David Hyde.

Flickr Photo/Michael Holden

Dave Meinert manages bands like the Hey Marseilles and the Lumineers. He’s involved with the 5 Point Café, and he started Seattle’s other big music festival: the Capitol Hill Block Party. He's also been a driving political force for the last few decades, helping shape the culture and nightlife of this city.

Grocery workers at QFC, Albertsons, Safeway and Fred Meyer have been in contract negotiations since March. Workers take issue with the grocery stores' current contract proposals: their lack of health care coverage, their holiday pay policy and stagnant wages.

The union member bargaining team has recommended a strike vote. The grocery unions, United Food Commercial Workers Local 21, Local 367 and the Teamsters Local 38 are holding strike authorization votes this week. David Hyde talks with UFCW Local 21 communications director Tom Geiger about the potential strike.

Katy Butler's book "Knocking on Heaven's Door."

When Katy Butler’s father had a major stroke the family had a lot of medical options, except the one they most wanted: a humane and timely death. David Hyde speaks with Katy Butler about her new book, "Knocking On Heaven’s Door: The Path To A Better Way Of Death."

Flickr Photo/US Department of Agriculture (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It's been a tough fire season for the elite group of firefighters known as hotshots; and not because of the fires.

Hotshots are used to the hard work. They work 14 days in a row, then get three days off, then repeat the cycle over and over again until winter finally puts the nation's fires to bed. They're deployed throughout the West, never knowing where they'll be sent until the last minute. They work with their hands, using chainsaws and shovels. Sometimes, they have to work through grief, as they did this summer when a fire near Phoenix, Arizona, swallowed 19 hotshots in one gulp.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

David Hyde went to visit the Vashon-Maury Island Basin steward for King County, Greg Rabourn, who helps restore Puget Sound shorelines one beach at a time. Rabourn led Hyde on a tour of the Dockton shoreline, where he and his team have been removing creosote pilings, bulkheads and decades of fill.

The site was originally a salt marsh. Then, a sawmill came in, and covered the marsh with log ends. Later came fill dirt, bricks from a nearby factory, and boulders. Now, all that stuff has been scraped away revealing spongy peat -- a gift from that long-buried marsh. Rabourn says he suspects there are dormant seeds hiding in that peat that could now sprout after seeing sunlight for the first time in a century.

Rabourn is a native plant expert and has been a frequent guest of KUOW as part of the Greendays panel.
 

Should Seattle Provide Universal Preschool?

Sep 6, 2013
The city of Seattle is scaling back plans for its subsidized preschool program.
Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC BY-NC-SA)/http://bit.ly/1LQhs3d

On Wednesday, the Seattle City Council held its first committee meeting to consider a plan for providing universal preschool for three and four year olds. The effort is being led by Councilmember Tim Burgess.

Burgess told KUOW that "we know from all of the academic research that preschool for three and four year olds is a key step to prepare them to enter kindergarten, so they can learn and thrive throughout their education process."

Not everyone finds that research so convincing. Liv Finne of the Washington Policy's Education Center said, "the research has been exaggerated," and if Seattle moves forward with a plan to provide universal preschool, "we're not going to get the results that are being promised."

The Seattle City Council will continue to meet in the coming months. 

Flickr Photo/Wizetux

We take for granted the fact that we can predict long-term weather forecasts. Now scientists at the University of Washington are working on ways to forecast the changing conditions of the ocean. They hope these forecasts can help them better understand how those conditions affect Northwest fisheries. 

Samantha Siedlecki is a research scientist at the University of Washington Joint Institute of the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean; she helped develop the forecasting tools and explains the way they work.

Last year’s violent tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut, put school safety at the forefront. As the new school year begins, we take a look at two approaches to school safety in Washington state. David Hyde speaks with Rainier School District Superintendent Tim Garchow and Snohomish County Executive John Lovick.

AP Photo/AP Pool

President Obama arrived in St. Petersburg, Russia, today for the G-20 summit. He’s expected to make his case for launching a military strike on Syria.

Russian President Vladimir Putin is publicly opposed to military action in Syria – a longtime Russian ally. Yesterday, Putin accused Secretary of State John Kerry of lying to the US Congress about Al Qaeda’s presence in Syria.

Relations between the two countries have been increasingly tense recently. Just last month Obama canceled a one-on-one meeting with Putin, after Russia granted NSA leaker Edward Snowden temporary asylum.

What other factors are pushing the two countries apart? And how will tensions influence the discussions between the United States and Russia over a potential military strike in Syria? Dr. Stephen F. Cohen is professor emeritus of Russian history and politics at New York University and Princeton University. He talked with David Hyde.

Flickr Photo/Santiago Almada

Things are changing fast regarding the situation in Syria. UN technicians are working around the clock to analyze samples from the chemical attacks in Syria. President Obama says he won’t wait for those results.

But definitive proof that Assad used chemical weapons – either from the UN or from another intelligence agency – could have far reaching consequences.

The BBC’s Middle East editor Sebastian Usher has been keeping tabs on UK politicians since they rejected military intervention last week. Usher says proof that Assad used chemical weapons could be enough to tip the balance of public opinion in the UK. He says that could lead to a second parliamentary vote, a vote that could reverse the country’s position and authorize the UK to join the US led coalition against Syria.

Meanwhile, the UN is urging a more cautious approach. Secretary General Ban ki-Moon suggested yesterday that any offensive strike in Syria without UN Security Council approval would be illegal.

Sebastian Usher spoke today with KUOW’s David Hyde.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

There are many changes afoot at Microsoft these days. CEO Steve Ballmer announced his retirement last month, giving the company an opportunity to move in a new direction.

Just this week the company also announced it was acquiring Nokia's mobile phone business in a $7.2 billion  deal. So what does the new CEO need to do to keep the company relevant and innovative?

Sandeep Krishnamurthy is the dean of the business school at UW Bothell. He talked with us about the future of Microsoft after Ballmer’s exit.

AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin

Former pro basketball player Dennis Rodman has returned to North Korea for another so-called “basketball diplomacy” tour. Yet just last week, North Korea canceled the visit of US envoy Robert King, who was attempting to secure the release of Lynnwood resident Kenneth Bae.

In the past, North Korea has attempted to use detentions of Americans to win diplomatic concessions. Why did they cancel King’s trip? And what does North Korea gain by inviting Dennis Rodman back? David Hyde spoke with Charles Armstrong, professor of history at Columbia University, to find out.

Dennis Rodman: Kim Jong Un is "awesome."

Does Rodman's attitude toward the North Korean leader help legitimize his regime? North Korean media has been playing up the unlikely duo's relationship, but Armstrong had this to say about Rodman's testimony:


Eddie Weber runs 11 clean and sober houses in Kent, Wash.  Five of those are full of sex offenders, which is a  problem according to the city of Kent. The city attorney has promised to start fining Weber $2,500 dollars a day – $500 for each house – because those houses violate the city’s zoning code.

Weber said Kent’s action is part of a larger trend where Draconian laws are enacted to drive sex offenders out of communities. Weber spoke to KUOW’s David Hyde.

Produced by Joshua McNichols.

President Obama is asking Congress to approve air strikes against Syria in the wake of evidence that chemical weapons were used on civilians in the country. How is Washington's congressional delegation responding?

Rep. Adam Smith has just returned from the Syria-Jordan border. He said in a statement that the United States “should expand and accelerate our support for moderate elements of opposition forces” in Syria. Rep. Smith joins us to explain how the United States might support Syrian opposition.

Flickr Photo/Spiros Vathis

For months now, tensions have been brewing between Seattle taxi drivers and ridesharing services like Uber-X, Sidecar and Lyft. Seattle cab drivers (who are heavily regulated by the city) claim ridesharing services have an advantage since they’re not subject to the same rules and regulations.

So this summer, the city commissioned a $100,000 study to determine the demand for taxis, rideshares, for-hires and limousines. What did the study find? And how will the results inform how the city proceeds? Seattle City Council President Sally Clark joins us with the results.

Part of Governor Jay Inslee’s proposed budget, released Thursday, includes adding money to help the state Department of Social and Health Services intervene more quickly in cases of possible child abuse.

The National Rifle Association (NRA) is opposed to a proposed state law (House Bill 1588) that would require universal background checks for gun purchases in Washington state.

Supporters aim to prevent more convicted felons from getting their hands on guns that can currently be purchased without a background check though private sales. The NRA says felons would still get guns though black-market sales and other avenues.

Dan Pearce / Flickr

According to the most recent census, there are more than 1.7 million single fathers in the US and more than 175,000 stay-at-home dads, and their numbers are on the rise. David Hyde spoke to single and stay-at-home dads to ask them what it's like: the highs, the lows, parenting styles, the trials and tribulations of combing a little girl's hair, and even the dating perks.

The United States doesn't currently have a plan for dealing with the problem of climate change. But President Obama is expected to bring it up in his State of the Union address tomorrow night. What is he expected to say? What’s he likely to do? David S. Roberts of the Seattle-based environmental magazine Grist talks with David Hyde about his predictions on how the president will attempt to tackle climate change.

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