David Hyde

Interviewer and Executive Producer, The Record

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and written for publications across the political spectrum including Salon, the New York Sun and Grist.

In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum. Now on The Record, David says his main goal is to create radio that really matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways To Connect

David Hyde talks to Seattle freelance writer Christopher Solomon about glamping, or glamorous camping, in Washington State parks.

The Seattle Police Department's "Safe Place" decal.
Seattle Police

David Hyde speaks with officer Jim Ritter, LGBTQ Liaison for the Seattle Police Department, about the new Safe Place program which aims to keep the city's LGBTQ community safe from harassment and violence. 

British Ambassador Sir Peter Westmacott in the KUOW offices, May 2015.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

David Hyde speaks with British Ambassador Sir Peter Westmacott about a unique environmental partnership between Washington state and the United Kingdom. They also discuss the recent tussle between Shell Oil and the City of Seattle. 

Rainier Vista townhomes near Martin Luther King Jr Way S.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with Erica C. Barnett about the pros and cons of a new idea for Seattle: neighborhood conservation districts.

Flickr photo/Jason Walsh (CC BY 2.0)

    

David Hyde talks to seafood economics expert Gunnar Knapp about why Copper River salmon is so expensive.  

Student activists Angela Feng, Sarra Tekola and Alex Lenferna of Divest UW appear before the UW Board of Regents on March 12, 2015 to urge the university to get rid of its coal investments.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

David Hyde speaks with Vox.com writer David Roberts who says student activists at the UW and elsewhere are changing the debate about climate change by making it a moral issue.

A man who identified himself as Missoula attorney Thomas Dove, right, elbows his way to the stage at a forum open to the public on May 6, accusing author Jon Krakauer, center, of lying and using confidential documents in his new book about rape in Missoul
Jacob Green via AP

David Hyde speaks with Eric Whitney, news director for Montana Public Radio, about author Jon Krakauer's visit to Missoula, Montana last night to face criticism of his new book, "Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town."

File photo of a commerical chicken farm
Flickr Photo/Chesapeake Bay Program (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with Oregonian reporter Lynne Terry about her recent story about salmonella outbreaks involving Foster Farms called "A Game of Chicken. "

William Shatner.
Flickr Photo/Brian Wilkins (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Why is William Shatner coming for our water? Does Seattle need rent control? Can a new policing plan tackle drug dealing downtown? Is tipping on the way out?

David Hyde sits in for Bill Radke to review the week’s news along with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, 'The C is For Crank' blogger Erica C. Barnett and former Washington state Attorney General Rob McKenna.

Flickr Photo/Philip Robertson

In recent weeks, the 12th Man has been more ubiquitous in Seattle than rainfall (actually, we’ve been having pretty mild weather).

The flying flags, Blue Fridays and produce displays actually have a psychological and evolutionary basis, according to Eric Simons, author of “The Secret Lives of Sports Fans.”

Flickr Photo/WSDOT

She loves dirt and hates sunlight. Seattle Magazine named her one of 2013’s most influential people, except she’s not really a person. She’s Bertha, the world’s biggest tunnel boring machine, charged with digging out the replacement path for the Alaskan Way Viaduct under Seattle.

Her profile on the Washington State Department of Transportation site lists her occupation as a tunneling specialist, but right now she’s stuck and has been since December 6. In light of her current predicament, the decision to name the machine, and thus humanize it, could be a shrewd move.

A limited number of venues across the country will show the film “The Interview” tomorrow. Ark Lodge Cinemas in Seattle’s Columbia City neighborhood is among them. Owner David McRae made the choice to run it.

David Hyde talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the announcement the U.S. made to normalize ties with Cuba.

Flickr Photo/OnceAndFutureLaura

David Hyde speaks with the Justice Mary Yu, who was sworn in to the Washington Supreme Court on May 20, 2014.  She's the first Asian-American and openly gay Supreme Court justice in Washington.

Seattle's Mormon Temple, used for rituals and weddings. Mormons attend church in wards on Sundays.
Flickr Photo/Tyler Foote (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Earlier this week Kate Kelly, the founder of a group advocating for women to be ordained into the Mormon priesthood, was excommunicated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints for apostasy.

“For Mormons it’s really the equivalent of spiritual death,” said Natalie Kelly, a Seattle-based member of that group, Ordain Women. She is not related to Kate Kelly.

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