David Hyde | KUOW News and Information

David Hyde

Reporter and Interviewer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a reporter and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create balanced radio that matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Will Vancouver continue to be a stand-in for Seattle in film and television.
Flickr Photo/Alex Costin (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rTJE31

The Trump presidency is dampening some Canadians’ enthusiasm for travel to the United States.

That’s according to the Conference Board of Canada, a not-for-profit group that tracks economic trends.

Gary Locke is former U.S. ambassador to China and former Governor of Washington State
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

Gary Locke worries the Trump administration is lurching toward a twofold disaster in its China policy.

But he's also hopeful that disaster can be avoided.

Seattle Pacific University
Flickr photo/Curtis Cronn/https://flic.kr/p/aUakxD

Something unusual happened on Jobe Korb-Nice's most recent international trip to recruit students for Seattle Pacific University. Students expressed fear about coming to America.

And Korb-Nice wasn't in one of seven Muslim countries covered by President Donald Trump's travel ban. He was in Norway. 


Red Square, University of Washington campus
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1QnEFc7

Universities in Washington state are scrambling to respond to President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration.


Washington Democrats chair Jaxon Ravens faces challengers from within the party.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Democrats and Republicans in Washington state will vote on their parties’ leadership this weekend.

And the differences are stark.


 David Rolf, president of SEIU 775, which represents home care and nursing home workers in Washington state and Montana.
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

What if you got paid $1,000 month ... for doing nothing? That’s a serious proposal that one prominent Washington state labor leader wants President Donald Trump to consider.


King County Sheriff John Urquhart
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

King County Sheriff John Urquhart doesn't think much of President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.

"We don't ask somebody about their immigration status,” Urquhart said. “We don't ask for a green card.  We don't ask for anything like that. And that policy is not going to change."


The 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, D.C., and the women's march in Seattle on Saturday.
Library of Congress / KUOW photo/Joshua McNichols

In 1913, a lot of women were pissed at President Woodrow Wilson, so they marched on Washington. Wilson had just won the presidential election, but unlike one of his opponents, he opposed giving women the right to vote.

So women’s suffrage activists led by Alice Paul decided it was time for a protest march on Washington.


Tonia Arehart offered some encouragement to the high school students and others joining a protest at Seattle Central College on Friday.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

The day started with an inauguration viewing event at Town Hall. And Friday night, Seattle was wrapping up with a big protest at Westlake Park and another at the University of Washington.

In between ...

Wimps singer/ guitarist Rachel Ratner
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

Donald Trump’s promise to build a wall along the Mexico border has inspired plenty of protest. Including a song by Portland-based musician Kyle Craft, “Before the Wall."

“It's just one big question,” Craft said, asking “what does that wall represent, not only to people inside of it, but outside of it?”


Megan Moffat Sather and her daughter, Winslow
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

As soon as the presidential election results were in, Megan Moffat Sather of West Seattle got a call from her lawyer: It was time to adopt her 6-month-old daughter, Winslow.

"I have to go through something that I think is actually humiliating," Moffat Sather said. "I have to pay my own money for someone to come into my home and to judge whether or not I should be able to be the parent to my own child."

Washington state Senator Tim Sheldon says people in Mason County bought the economic message that Donald Trump was selling.
KUOW Photo / David Hyde

When you first hit the road from Seattle on your way to Mason County there are lots of signs that the economy is buzzing, like construction cranes, shiny new buildings and hybrid cars.

But when you wind around past Olympia into Mason County, you're more likely to see a pickup truck with a gun rack than a Prius. And the average wage in Mason in 2015 was about half as much as in King County.


Democrat Germaine Kornegay and Republican Bill Orsborn try to bridge the partisan divide at Gateway Car Clinic and Transmissions in Mount Vernon, Washington
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Germaine Kornegay is the first and only African-American to be elected to the Sedro-Woolley City Council. She was a Hillary Clinton delegate to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. 

Despite this, she’s friends with many Republicans. 

Demonstrators in Seattle form a human chain around City Hall in support of a $15 minimum wage in April 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Donald Trump’s pick as secretary of labor is a fast-food CEO. And that’s got labor leaders concerned.

Andrew Puzder heads the parent company for Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. And he's against a proposal to raise the national minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Confronted with hate speech in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, Amy Kastelin said 'that's unacceptable.'
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Amy Kastelin was at the U.S. Bank in Ballard this week when another customer yelled at a teller.

“Go back to where you came from,” the customer told the bank worker.


Mina Sultana, co-president of the Muslim Student Association at the UW, advises all Muslim students to walk with a buddy on and off campus and 'be extra cautious of their surroundings.'
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

The 911 call came in two days after the presidential election from the security guard at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle.  He was reporting a possible hate crime.  

The target was a 16-year-old student who was on her way to school when a man she did not know allegedly grabbed her by the arm and refused to let her go. 


'No one deserves this,' says UW student Nasro Hassan. She says she was attacked on the University of Washington campus Nov. 15.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Interfaith leaders say an attack on a Muslim student on the University of Washington campus could be a hate crime.

They want the FBI to investigate the Nov. 15 incident.


Gov. George Wallace, left, attempts to block integration at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.
By Warren K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report Magazine [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of hate crimes have been reported since the recent presidential election, including several incidents in the greater Seattle area.  Many people are scared and uncertain about where things are headed next.

But University of Washington professor Margaret O’Mara says studying history gives her reason to hope.


King County Executive Dow Constantine celebrates the Sound Transit Board's approval of a ST3 package for the fall ballot.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

King County Executive Dow Constantine says he will defy President-elect Donald Trump on immigration policy, even if it means federal funding cuts.

Hannah Atlas hugs her mom, Judith Gille, as the crowd sings the late Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" during a vigil Sunday at Seattle's Cal Anderson Park.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

People letting out raw emotion and looking for community. A new generation of Americans getting a crash course in politics.

Hundreds gathered Sunday evening at Seattle's Cal Anderson Park on Capitol Hill to voice support for American democracy and opposition to President-elect Donald Trump.

Fans at a Seattle Seahawks match.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

It's been almost two years since the Seattle Seahawks lost the Super Bowl to the New England Patriots. This Sunday, the two teams meet for the first time since then in a game that's being called a Super Bowl rematch. 

Sports writer Dave Zirin said for some fans in Seattle, which voted overwhelmingly against Donald Trump, it will also be political grudge match.  


David Hyde speaks with Vox climate politics reporter David Roberts about why many on the left opposed a Washington state carbon tax initiative, even though that put them on the same side as the energy industry.

A boy cheers at the Republican watch party in Bellevue on Tuesday night, as Donald Trump clinches Florida.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

The Republicans in the ballroom at the Hyatt in Bellevue weren't expecting this. They showed up late, and bowls of popcorn sat alone on tables. The scene was glum. 

Durell Green is voting for the first time in 2016. 'I feel like a citizen again, like my rights are almost all the way restored.'
KUOW Photos/Gil Aegerter

You know how you get your ballot in the mail, and you throw it in with the pile of fall catalogs and bills? And you say to yourself: “Oh, yeah, voting. Yeah. Gotta get to that.”

Well, that's not what it's like for former prisoners like Susan Mason taking advantage of a change in state law. She anticipated her ballot this year.


Linda Brewster of Port Townsend is in Seattle to make some phone calls for I-735.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Linda Brewster lives in Port Townsend, but today she traveled to Seattle to make phone calls for Initiative 735. She estimates she's dedicated over 1,500 hours of her life to this campaign.

Rashid Abdi registers to vote for the first time
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Amina Ahmed faces an uphill battle on a breezy Saturday morning in a neighborhood straddling Tukwila and SeaTac: She's running a voter registration drive.

Ahmed is up against power and influence in American politics. The wealthy have it. And they also vote at much higher rates.


Eileen Simpkins is with her.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Braving a major storm, around 2,000 Hillary Clinton supporters waited in line in rain and wind to see their candidate in downtown Seattle.

Even shelling out at least $250 for the event at the Paramount Theatre didn't dampen their enthusiasm.


Republican candidate Janice Huxford on the campaign trail.
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

A bump in the state minimum wage is on your fall ballot – Initiative 1433. It would raise the hourly wage $4 by the year 2020.

In one Snohomish County swing district, Republicans and Democrats are battling over that increase. And their struggle may help determine which party controls the state Legislature next year. 

Women's suffragists parade in New York City in 1917, carrying placards with signatures of more than a million women.
Wikimedia Commons

There was a time when voting wasn’t so boring.

History remembers those bygone voting days as a blast. Think the Suffrage movement, Civil Rights and pretty much all the 19th century (before women or people of color could vote, so not much of a party for them). But in the last decades, voting has become antiseptic and antisocial.

Kaitlyn Beck is running for Position 1 in the 49th District in Vancouver, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Hillary Clinton could be America's first female president, but for Washington state, another historic first is possible this year. 

Down in Vancouver, there’s a candidate who would be the first openly transgender member of the Washington State Legislature. Kaitlyn Beck is running for Position 1 in the 49th District. 

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