David Hyde | KUOW News and Information

David Hyde

Reporter and Interviewer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a contributing producer and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create radio that really matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Durell Green is voting for the first time in 2016. 'I feel like a citizen again, like my rights are almost all the way restored.'
KUOW Photos/Gil Aegerter

You know how you get your ballot in the mail, and you throw it in with the pile of fall catalogs and bills? And you say to yourself: “Oh, yeah, voting. Yeah. Gotta get to that.”

Well, that's not what it's like for former prisoners like Susan Mason taking advantage of a change in state law. She anticipated her ballot this year.


Linda Brewster of Port Townsend is in Seattle to make some phone calls for I-735.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Linda Brewster lives in Port Townsend, but today she traveled to Seattle to make phone calls for Initiative 735. She estimates she's dedicated over 1,500 hours of her life to this campaign.

Rashid Abdi registers to vote for the first time
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Amina Ahmed faces an uphill battle on a breezy Saturday morning in a neighborhood straddling Tukwila and SeaTac: She's running a voter registration drive.

Ahmed is up against power and influence in American politics. The wealthy have it. And they also vote at much higher rates.


Eileen Simpkins is with her.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Braving a major storm, around 2,000 Hillary Clinton supporters waited in line in rain and wind to see their candidate in downtown Seattle.

Even shelling out at least $250 for the event at the Paramount Theatre didn't dampen their enthusiasm.


Republican candidate Janice Huxford on the campaign trail.
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

A bump in the state minimum wage is on your fall ballot – Initiative 1433. It would raise the hourly wage $4 by the year 2020.

In one Snohomish County swing district, Republicans and Democrats are battling over that increase. And their struggle may help determine which party controls the state Legislature next year. 

Women's suffragists parade in New York City in 1917, carrying placards with signatures of more than a million women.
Wikimedia Commons

There was a time when voting wasn’t so boring.

History remembers those bygone voting days as a blast. Think the Suffrage movement, Civil Rights and pretty much all the 19th century (before women or people of color could vote, so not much of a party for them). But in the last decades, voting has become antiseptic and antisocial.

Kaitlyn Beck is running for Position 1 in the 49th District in Vancouver, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Hillary Clinton could be America's first female president, but for Washington state, another historic first is possible this year. 

Down in Vancouver, there’s a candidate who would be the first openly transgender member of the Washington State Legislature. Kaitlyn Beck is running for Position 1 in the 49th District. 

This is the most Republican block in Seattle

Sep 27, 2016
Can you see them?
Google Earth

The most Republican block in Seattle is at 116 Fairview Avenue North in South Lake Union.

It’s the site of a large, upscale retirement community called Mirabella. Nothing outside screams Republican – no Trump hats or “Hillary for Prison in 2016.” 

Incumbent Democrat Jay Inslee takes on Republican Bill Bryant in a governor's debate Monday night in Seattle. It starts 30 minutes after the presidential debate. Will anyone have the strength to stay tuned?  


Trifin Sergieff of Des Moines, Washington, held the sign. He says Johnson's message in debate would be less war, and lower taxes.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson failed to qualify for the first presidential debate – but he’s not out of the race.

He held a rally for supporters Saturday afternoon at the Sheraton in Seattle. Beforehand, Johnson told KUOW’s David Hyde about his message for Washingtonians in 2016.

Robin Everett, a Sierra Club organizer, says that Trump sees that workers and the environment are not being protected through these trade deals.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Last month in Everett, Donald Trump called the Trans-Pacific Partnership a “disaster.”

Hillary Clinton opposes it, too. So what does the rise in anti-trade politics mean for Washington – the most trade-dependent state?

 Trump fan David Johnston of Maple Valley got to Donald Trump's Everett rally at 2 a.m. He said he arrived that early in hopes of getting his hat signed.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about Donald Trump's event in Everett Tuesday night. Trump spoke to a crowd about jobs and how he plans to keep them in Washington state. 

Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Xfinity Arena in Everett on Tuesday night.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Donald Trump said he’s got a good reason to bring his anti-TPP, anti-refugee rhetoric to Boeing country.

“They say Republicans don’t win Washington state, but we’re going to win it,” Trump told the crowd Tuesday night at Xfinity Arena in Everett. “That’s why I’m here.”


Boeing worker Michael McNeil waits in line Tuesday afternoon to get into Everett's Xfinity Arena to hear Donald Trump speak.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Fans of Donald Trump lined up by the thousands to hear him speak at a rally Tuesday evening in Everett.

They were met by protesters who said his policies would be bad for Boeing, minorities, women and the country in general.

Gov. Jay Inslee, left, a Democrat, and Bill Bryant, his Republican opponent.
Campaign photographs

The first Washington gubernatorial debate of the season happened yesterday. Incumbent Gov. Jay Inslee – a Democrat –  faced off against former Seattle Port Commissioner and Republican Bill Bryant out in Spokane.  

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