David Hyde | KUOW News and Information

David Hyde

Reporter and Interviewer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a reporter and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create balanced radio that matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, left, walks past his husband, Michael Shiosaki, center, and his attorney, Bob Sulkin, to make a statement to media members Friday, April 7, 2017, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Ed Murray’s lawyer says a doctor’s exam shows sexual assault allegations against the Seattle mayor are false.


Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.
Starbucks press photo

The scene at Seattle’s McCaw Hall had the feel of a tent revival meeting. There was gospel music. "Lord, please let me go ... take me to the river, I want to go," Leon Bridges sang.

And there were testimonials — by employees, praising the policies and positions that Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz has taken.

Article from the Sept. 16, 1906 Puget Sound American describing "Hindu" immigration to Bellingham, Washington.
South Asian American Digital Archive (http://bit.ly/2lBgW3u)

The Bellingham riots of 1907 made national news: Hundreds of white workers viciously attacked east Indian men, mostly Sikhs.


Men attend Sunday services at the Gurudwara Singh Sabha of Washington, a Sikh temple in Renton, Wash., Sunday, March 5, 2017, south of Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

The shooting of a Sikh man in Kent is prompting calls for the Trump administration to create a special hate crime task force.

The FBI said Monday that a civil rights investigation has been launched in conjunction with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice.

The front page of the Seattle Times - Seattle Post-Intelligencer Sunday edition on Dec. 9, 1984.
Seattle Public Library archives

Behold the bloody story of The Order, which ended in fire and death on Whidbey Island.


Democrats from Washington state will be in Atlanta on Saturday to help pick a new leader for the Democratic National Committee.

Gov. Jay Inslee is backing Tom Perez, labor secretary in the Obama administration. Tina Podlodowski, recently elected chair of the Washington State Democratic Party, is backing Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison.

At a session in Fremont, Shaine Truscott with SEIU-775 helps train "peacekeepers" for protests.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

In a Fremont conference room, about a dozen people pored over a hand-drawn map of the area around Republican Congressman Dave Reichert's office over in Issaquah. 

This is the specter currently haunting President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress: a left-wing Tea Party movement – led by paid protesters – that aims to disrupt their Town Halls and other public events across the country.


Mardie Rhodes of Sammamish was one of the people at the rally in Issaquah on Thursday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

Protesters gathered outside Congressman Dave Reichert's office in Issaquah on Thursday, upset that he hasn’t scheduled face time with the public during the first Congressional recess since Donald Trump was elected president.

Flowers outside Jewish Federation Building commemorate the 2006 hate-crime shooting .
Flickr Photo/Belltown Messenger (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4ysFZA

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump spoke out against anti-Semitic threats and incidents, calling them "horrible" and "painful." That's after passing up a couple of chances to do so since he became president.

Nancy Greer, the president and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle, told KUOW's David Hyde at least it's a start.

  

President Donald Trump shakes hands with 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch, his choice for Supreme Court associate justice in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017.
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

How would U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch handle the case of the Eastern Washington florist who refused to sell wedding flowers to a same-sex couple?

It’s not completely clear, but there are some hints, Slate writer Dahlia Lithwick told KUOW’s David Hyde.

Felimon Pineda (left), vice president of the union Familias Unidas por La Justica, marches from Burlington toward Mount Vernon on Sunday.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Mike Youngquist has just about had it with Donald Trump on immigration. And with Democrats too.

"Neither one of them want to get in and solve the problem,” said Youngquist, a Republican who has been farming much of his life in the Skagit Valley. “They just want to argue about it."


Will Vancouver continue to be a stand-in for Seattle in film and television.
Flickr Photo/Alex Costin (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rTJE31

The Trump presidency is dampening some Canadians’ enthusiasm for travel to the United States.

That’s according to the Conference Board of Canada, a not-for-profit group that tracks economic trends.

Gary Locke is former U.S. ambassador to China and former Governor of Washington State
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

Gary Locke worries the Trump administration is lurching toward a twofold disaster in its China policy.

But he's also hopeful that disaster can be avoided.

Seattle Pacific University
Flickr photo/Curtis Cronn/https://flic.kr/p/aUakxD

Something unusual happened on Jobe Korb-Nice's most recent international trip to recruit students for Seattle Pacific University. Students expressed fear about coming to America.

And Korb-Nice wasn't in one of seven Muslim countries covered by President Donald Trump's travel ban. He was in Norway. 


Red Square, University of Washington campus
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1QnEFc7

Universities in Washington state are scrambling to respond to President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration.


Washington Democrats chair Jaxon Ravens faces challengers from within the party.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Democrats and Republicans in Washington state will vote on their parties’ leadership this weekend.

And the differences are stark.


 David Rolf, president of SEIU 775, which represents home care and nursing home workers in Washington state and Montana.
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

What if you got paid $1,000 month ... for doing nothing? That’s a serious proposal that one prominent Washington state labor leader wants President Donald Trump to consider.


King County Sheriff John Urquhart
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

King County Sheriff John Urquhart doesn't think much of President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.

"We don't ask somebody about their immigration status,” Urquhart said. “We don't ask for a green card.  We don't ask for anything like that. And that policy is not going to change."


The 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, D.C., and the women's march in Seattle on Saturday.
Library of Congress / KUOW photo/Joshua McNichols

In 1913, a lot of women were pissed at President Woodrow Wilson, so they marched on Washington. Wilson had just won the presidential election, but unlike one of his opponents, he opposed giving women the right to vote.

So women’s suffrage activists led by Alice Paul decided it was time for a protest march on Washington.


Tonia Arehart offered some encouragement to the high school students and others joining a protest at Seattle Central College on Friday.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

The day started with an inauguration viewing event at Town Hall. And Friday night, Seattle was wrapping up with a big protest at Westlake Park and another at the University of Washington.

In between ...

Wimps singer/ guitarist Rachel Ratner
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

Donald Trump’s promise to build a wall along the Mexico border has inspired plenty of protest. Including a song by Portland-based musician Kyle Craft, “Before the Wall."

“It's just one big question,” Craft said, asking “what does that wall represent, not only to people inside of it, but outside of it?”


Megan Moffat Sather and her daughter, Winslow
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

As soon as the presidential election results were in, Megan Moffat Sather of West Seattle got a call from her lawyer: It was time to adopt her 6-month-old daughter, Winslow.

"I have to go through something that I think is actually humiliating," Moffat Sather said. "I have to pay my own money for someone to come into my home and to judge whether or not I should be able to be the parent to my own child."

Washington state Senator Tim Sheldon says people in Mason County bought the economic message that Donald Trump was selling.
KUOW Photo / David Hyde

When you first hit the road from Seattle on your way to Mason County there are lots of signs that the economy is buzzing, like construction cranes, shiny new buildings and hybrid cars.

But when you wind around past Olympia into Mason County, you're more likely to see a pickup truck with a gun rack than a Prius. And the average wage in Mason in 2015 was about half as much as in King County.


Democrat Germaine Kornegay and Republican Bill Orsborn try to bridge the partisan divide at Gateway Car Clinic and Transmissions in Mount Vernon, Washington
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Germaine Kornegay is the first and only African-American to be elected to the Sedro-Woolley City Council. She was a Hillary Clinton delegate to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. 

Despite this, she’s friends with many Republicans. 

Demonstrators in Seattle form a human chain around City Hall in support of a $15 minimum wage in April 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Donald Trump’s pick as secretary of labor is a fast-food CEO. And that’s got labor leaders concerned.

Andrew Puzder heads the parent company for Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. And he's against a proposal to raise the national minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Confronted with hate speech in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, Amy Kastelin said 'that's unacceptable.'
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Amy Kastelin was at the U.S. Bank in Ballard this week when another customer yelled at a teller.

“Go back to where you came from,” the customer told the bank worker.


Mina Sultana, co-president of the Muslim Student Association at the UW, advises all Muslim students to walk with a buddy on and off campus and 'be extra cautious of their surroundings.'
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

The 911 call came in two days after the presidential election from the security guard at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle.  He was reporting a possible hate crime.  

The target was a 16-year-old student who was on her way to school when a man she did not know allegedly grabbed her by the arm and refused to let her go. 


'No one deserves this,' says UW student Nasro Hassan. She says she was attacked on the University of Washington campus Nov. 15.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Interfaith leaders say an attack on a Muslim student on the University of Washington campus could be a hate crime.

They want the FBI to investigate the Nov. 15 incident.


Gov. George Wallace, left, attempts to block integration at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.
By Warren K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report Magazine [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of hate crimes have been reported since the recent presidential election, including several incidents in the greater Seattle area.  Many people are scared and uncertain about where things are headed next.

But University of Washington professor Margaret O’Mara says studying history gives her reason to hope.


King County Executive Dow Constantine celebrates the Sound Transit Board's approval of a ST3 package for the fall ballot.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

King County Executive Dow Constantine says he will defy President-elect Donald Trump on immigration policy, even if it means federal funding cuts.

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