David Hyde | KUOW News and Information

David Hyde

Reporter and Interviewer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a reporter and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create balanced radio that matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Police officers pause next to a sign outside a restaurant as they observe a May Day anti-capitalism march, Friday, May 1, 2015 in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

When you’re out marching on May Day in Seattle on Monday, remember how the tradition began: as an attempt to get workers an eight-hour day.

And then think about this: Some labor advocates say the eight-hour day is under attack in Congress.

David Callahan is founder and editor of Inside Philanthropy, a digital media site and his new book is "The Givers: Money, Power and Philanthropy in a New Gilded Age."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Billionaire philanthropists like Bill Gates, Paul Allen and Steve Ballmer are doing a lot to change the world.

Often it's for the better. But billionaire philanthropy can also be a threat to democracy. That's the case author and philanthropy expert David Callahan makes.

science march
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It rained. 

Interstate 5 was shut down because of downed power lines. 

UW Professor David Montgomery says he'll march for science
Kvasir Society Photo/Joy Mathew

David Montgomery, a science professor and MacArthur Genius award winner at the University of Washington, told KUOW why he's marching for science on Saturday.

Screenshot of a brain hat knitting tutorial by Studio Knit on YouTube
YouTube/Studio Knit

What to wear to a protest march for science?  It's a serious debate on the March for Science, Seattle Facebook page.

Cary Moon in downtown Seattle.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

There’s another new candidate this week in the Seattle mayor's race: activist, landscape designer and engineer Cary Moon.

But Moon said her decision wasn’t influenced by a lawsuit accusing Seattle Mayor Ed Murray of sexually abusing a teenager back in the 1980s.

Last year only 67 percent of toddlers in Washington state were fully vaccinated by age 3.
Flickr Photo/Gates Foundation (CC BY-NC-ND)

UW philosopher Michael Blake supports a march for science because, he says, basic scientific knowledge is under attack, especially from the right. But Blake told KUOW's David Hyde that liberals are partly to blame, and that the problem goes way beyond science: 


Abigail Swann is a professor and climate scientist at the University of Washington
University of Washington / Quinn Russell Brown


University of Washington professor and climate researcher Abigail Swann tells politics reporter David Hyde about why she signed a protest letter directed at EPA chief Scott Pruitt. She also shares a story about the time a border official told her climate science is a hoax:  

Mike McGinn announces his candidacy for mayor outside his home in Seattle's Greenwood neighborhood.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

Mike McGinn wants to be mayor of Seattle again.

We got the first hint with a tweet Monday morning of an image of a campaign sign that read only: "Keep Seattle, McGinn 2017."

Sarah Myhre’s a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Washington.
David Hyde / KUOW Photos

Nicole Baker is a research scientist at the University of Washington who studies the state of global fish stocks. It's not political work. In fact, she's never been an activist and has never participated in a political march in her life. 

But last year when Donald Trump ran for president, Baker got political for the first time. And she says in 2017, something snapped.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, left, walks past his husband, Michael Shiosaki, center, and his attorney, Bob Sulkin, to make a statement to media members Friday, April 7, 2017, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Ed Murray’s lawyer says a doctor’s exam shows sexual assault allegations against the Seattle mayor are false.


Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.
Starbucks press photo

The scene at Seattle’s McCaw Hall had the feel of a tent revival meeting. There was gospel music. "Lord, please let me go ... take me to the river, I want to go," Leon Bridges sang.

And there were testimonials — by employees, praising the policies and positions that Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz has taken.

Article from the Sept. 16, 1906 Puget Sound American describing "Hindu" immigration to Bellingham, Washington.
South Asian American Digital Archive (http://bit.ly/2lBgW3u)

The Bellingham riots of 1907 made national news: Hundreds of white workers viciously attacked east Indian men, mostly Sikhs.


Men attend Sunday services at the Gurudwara Singh Sabha of Washington, a Sikh temple in Renton, Wash., Sunday, March 5, 2017, south of Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

The shooting of a Sikh man in Kent is prompting calls for the Trump administration to create a special hate crime task force.

The FBI said Monday that a civil rights investigation has been launched in conjunction with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice.

The front page of the Seattle Times - Seattle Post-Intelligencer Sunday edition on Dec. 9, 1984.
Seattle Public Library archives

Behold the bloody story of The Order, which ended in fire and death on Whidbey Island.


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