David Hyde

Contributing Reporter, Interviewer, And Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2004

Before landing in the Emerald City, David Hyde tried out several others, including New York, Tokyo and Portland, Oregon. As a student at Reed College in Portland, David discovered two loves: His love for the Pacific Northwest and for his spouse who is now a professor at the University of Washington.

David started in radio as a college DJ. Listeners responded with enthusiasm, he says, sometimes by throwing empty beer bottles at the station. In New York, David worked as the managing editor and reporter for a regional newspaper. He has also freelanced as a radio correspondent for National Public Radio and Pacifica Network News, and for publications including Salon and Grist. In addition to his reporting background, David has also pursued graduate work in U.S. cultural history (ABD); and he's taught college courses in U.S. cultural history, film and history, and American popular culture.

At KUOW since 2004, David has also worked on The Conversation, Weekday, and Speakers' Forum and The Record.  Now a contributing producer and interviewer, David says his main goal is to create radio that really matters to KUOW listeners. So if he's not doing that, please let him know.

Ways to Connect

Gov. Jay Inslee, left, a Democrat, and Bill Bryant, his Republican opponent.
Campaign photographs

The first Washington gubernatorial debate of the season happened yesterday. Incumbent Gov. Jay Inslee – a Democrat –  faced off against former Seattle Port Commissioner and Republican Bill Bryant out in Spokane.  

UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July. She says it's important  that "the hate speech they we're hearing -- the hate speech that's become the norm -- that that gets challenged."
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Donald Trump has replaced his earlier call for a total ban on Muslims entering the U.S.

Now he demands ideological tests on immigrants. “I call it extreme, extreme vetting,” Trump said in a speech Monday in Ohio.


Governor Jay Inslee.
Flickr Photo/GovInslee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A new poll out this week shows incumbent Jay Inslee with a big lead over challenger Bill Bryant in the battle for the Washington governor’s office.

But Bryant made some news too: He said he wouldn’t vote for fellow Republican Donald Trump.


Tony Ventrella dropped out of the race for Washington's 8th Congressional District, but jumped back in after the primary results.
Facebook Photo/Tony Ventrella for Congress

First, former Seattle area sportscaster Tony Ventrella jumped into the race. Then, he jumped out. But his name stayed on the ballot.

And then he surprised everyone, including himself, when he came in second in the top-two primary last month. That got him – a candidate who was out – back into the general election in November against six-term Republican Representative Dave Reichert.


Susan Atlas poses with a cutout of Hillary Clinton at a hotel lobby in Philadelphia on Friday.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

The Democratic National Convention wrapped up on Thursday night, with Hillary Clinton accepting the party's presidential nomination. KUOW's David Hyde and Kate Walters were in Philadelphia all week, covering Washington state's delegation. Here are some of the voices they heard.


Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

David Hyde talks with Sen. Patty Murray about Hillary Clinton's historic nomination for president. Murray speaks Thursday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July. She says it's important  that "the hate speech they we're hearing -- the hate speech that's become the norm -- that that gets challenged."
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton may not be the first woman to run for president. Victoria Woodhull did that back in 1872, on the Equal Rights Party ticket with Frederick Douglass.

But Hillary Clinton is the first to be nominated by a major political party. And that’s a big deal for a number of women from Washington state in Philadelphia for the Democratic National Convention.

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia about the Washington state delegation and their reactions to the convention so far. 

There was no script for the protest Tuesday night by Bernie supporters, who walked out after Hillary Clinton's formal nomination and jammed the media center.
KUOW PHOTO/KATE WALTERS

If you compare the tone of the Republican convention with Bill Clinton's speech on Tuesday night and Michelle Obama's two nights ago, you could argue that the Democrats are more positive.

But that’s what you see on stage. These are giant theatrical productions.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, traveled to Philadelphia to protest outside the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about growing protests outside the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. Radke also speaks with protester Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, Washington. 

Don't count on Charles Adkins, a Sanders delegate from Everett, to get on the Clinton train just yet.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Washington state delegates are split into two camps in Philadelphia this week at the Democratic National Convention.

Nearly three quarters of our state’s delegates are Bernie Sanders supporters. The rest back Hillary Clinton. 

So you’d expect some tension.


Washington state delegates who supported Ted Cruz pose in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention.
KUOW PHOTO/MATT MARTIN

Donald Trump officially accepted the Republican nomination for president Thursday night in Cleveland.

That ended what's been a pretty dramatic national convention. KUOW’s David Hyde told host Emily Fox what it’s been like.


One of the stickers for sale at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

The Republican National Convention wrapped up last night with Donald Trump accepting the party's presidential nomination.

KUOW's David Hyde and Matt Martin were in Cleveland all week, covering Washington state's delegation.

Here are some of the voices they heard, produced by Kate Walters and Andy Hurst.


Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

This year the Republican presidential nominee has divided the country – and his own party – as much as any nominee in over 40 years.

And much of that has do with his choice of words. 


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