Dana Farrington | KUOW News and Information

Dana Farrington

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET.

Texas' lieutenant governor is calling for the resignation of the Fort Worth Independent School District superintendent over guidelines intended to support transgender students.

California Gov. Jerry Brown has made some of the state's temporary water restrictions permanent. The executive order, in response to the state's drought, permanently bans wasteful practices like hosing sidewalks and washing cars with hoses that don't have shut-off nozzles.

West Point is investigating whether black female cadets violated any rules by raising their fists in a photo. The 16 women, following school tradition, posed in historical-style uniforms ahead of graduation later this month.

The investigation will look into whether the cadets violated the school honor code or a Department of Defense rule about political activities while in the Armed Forces.

Updated 6:10 a.m. ET Tuesday:

With 87 percent of precincts counted, Rodrigo Duterte, the mayor of southern Davao City, appears to have clinched the Philippines presidential election. Michael Sullivan reports for our Newscast Unit that Duterte, who began as a political outsider, "collected nearly twice as many votes as his two main rivals, including the man supported by outgoing President Benigno Aquino."

Results are still not official, but his two closest rivals have withdrawn from the race in the face of Duterte's commanding lead, Reuters reports.

Deep in the ocean, a mission is underway to explore the "unknown and poorly known areas" around the Mariana Trench.

Firefighters are still battling massive wildfires that forced mass evacuations of some 80,000 people earlier this week in Alberta, Canada.

Canadian police are escorting a convoy of evacuees through the wreckage, CBC News reports, out of the oil sands camps where they had been staying since Tuesday. As many as 8,000 people have been airlifted to safety, reporter Dan Karpenchuk tells our Newscast unit.

SpaceX has done it again. Launching from Cape Canaveral, Fla., early Friday morning, the company successfully landed part of its Falcon 9 rocket on a floating barge. A second part or "stage" continued into space, carrying a communications satellite.

A day after the Justice Department said a North Carolina law violates the Civil Rights Act, the state House speaker says lawmakers will not meet the DOJ's deadline to respond.

Finger-lickin' good?

KFC in Hong Kong is marketing edible nail polish that tastes like — wait for it — chicken.

"Yes, it is actually a real thing," the agency running the campaign tells The New York Times.

People are voting in local elections across the U.K. on Thursday, but there is extra attention focused on London's mayoral contest. If the race goes as many pollsters expect, the city could have its first Muslim mayor.

Parliament members Sadiq Khan of the Labour Party and Zac Goldsmith of the Conservative Party are the front-runners in the field of about a dozen candidates vying to replace Conservative Mayor Boris Johnson.

Time to check your frozen fruit and vegetable packages: CRF Frozen Foods has expanded a voluntary recall to include about 358 products under 42 different brands because of potential listeria contamination.

A full list of the items to avoid was included in the company's press release on Monday. The recall includes all frozen organic and nonorganic fruit and vegetable products manufactured or processed at CRF's facility in Pasco, Wash., since May 1, 2014.

Impressed, we are. With your #StarWarsDay celebrations, that is. The fourth is strong on the Interwebs.

It's a time for Star Wars-themed treats.

(Even here at NPR.)

And an excuse to show your creative side.

Of course, even this sacred day is not free of the presidential campaign.

The vessel that British explorer Capt. James Cook used to sail to Australia in the late 1700s may lie at the bottom of Newport Harbor, R.I.

The HMS Endeavour, later called the Lord Sandwich, is believed to be among a group of ships scuttled there as a blockade during the American Revolution. The Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, a nonprofit that does maritime history and marine archaeology research, says there is an 80 percent to 100 percent chance the Endeavour is still in the port.

The Marine Corps is investigating whether some of the six men in the photo of the 1945 flag-raising in Iwo Jima, Japan, were misidentified after two amateur historians raised questions about the famous image and statue.

The Marine Corps confirmed the review in a statement emailed to NPR. It said:

Detroit's public school teachers say they will return to their classrooms on Wednesday. Detroit schools were closed for two days, after many teachers called in sick to protest a budget shortfall that could mean no pay for hours they've already worked.

The announcement from the Detroit Federation of Teachers came hours after Michigan lawmakers advanced a $500 million plan to restructure Detroit public schools by creating a new district, The Associated Press reports.

More than 90 Detroit public schools were closed Monday because of a teacher "sickout" over pay.

The public schools will run out of money after June "unless Michigan lawmakers approve hundreds of millions of dollars in long-term aid," Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek tells our Newscast unit.

Without that longer-term funding, teachers who spread their paychecks throughout the year would not get paid for work they had already done.

Cwiek reports:

Yes, it's been a couple of days, but we felt compelled to share:

At 100 years old, Ida Keeling set a new world record for the 100-meter dash on Saturday at Penn Relays in Philadelphia.

She completed the race against competitors 80 and up in 1 minute and 17.33 seconds — the fastest time recorded for a centenarian. (For comparison's sake, Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt holds the 100-meter world record of 9.58 seconds.)

In May 2011, Osama bin Laden was killed by a team of Navy SEALs in Abbotabad, Pakistan. To mark five years since the death of the man whose terrorist network carried out the Sept. 11 attacks, the CIA posted a series of tweets re-creating the raid.

A friend of the man accused of shooting and killing nine people in a historically black church in Charleston, S.C., last year has pleaded guilty to failing to report a crime and lying to federal investigators.

Joey Meek, 21, could get up to eight years in prison, reports South Carolina Public Radio's Alexandra Olgin. She adds that attorney Deborah Barbier spoke on Meek's behalf in court on Friday, saying:

What do you get in Cracker Jack? A QR code, apparently.

The "Prize Inside" will no longer actually be inside the box, Frito-Lay has announced. Like so many other aspects of our lives, the prize will be digitized.

It might not have been a drone that struck a British Airways plane on April 17 after all.

British Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin told Parliament on Thursday that it was probably "not a drone incident," according to The Register, an online tech publication.

A former reserve deputy in Oklahoma who said he mistook his gun for his Taser when he shot and killed a suspect has been convicted of second-degree manslaughter. Robert Bates, 74, was a volunteer with the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office when he killed Eric Harris during a sting operation in April 2015.

Missouri's so-called religious freedom bill may be dead for this year. The amendment to the state Constitution would have protected people who didn't want to provide services related to same-sex marriages, including clerks, clergy and businesses.

Wednesday's 6-6 vote by a House committee stopped the measure from advancing, The Associated Press reports. Three Republicans joined three Democrats in opposition, the AP says.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert admitted at his sentencing hearing Wednesday that he sexually abused more than one student when he was a teacher and wrestling coach in Illinois decades ago, and said he was "ashamed."

Hastert initially said he had "mistreated" athletes, NPR's David Schaper tweeted from the courtroom. He added: "What I did was wrong and I regret it."

This post was updated at 7:45 p.m. ET.

A central neighborhood in Boston had been left out of Amazon's plans for free same-day delivery in the city. The company said on Tuesday that will change.

A Bloomberg analysis last week showed that the predominantly black Roxbury community did not have access to the Amazon Prime service, which is offered to all adjacent neighborhoods. After looking at nationwide data, Bloomberg called the disparity in Boston "the most striking."

A Dutch dentist has been sentenced to eight years behind bars for harming patients in a rural French town. The so-called dentist of horror injured more than 100 patients and committed insurance fraud in Chateau-Chinon, which reportedly had been without a dental care provider for years.

Jacobus Van Nierop, 51, isn't allowed to practice dentistry anymore, and he has to pay about $11,900, according to the BBC.

This post was updated at 8:30 p.m. ET.

A man who says he was sexually abused by former House Speaker Dennis Hastert has sued the Illinois Republican. The alleged victim says he received only $1.7 million of $3.5 million Hastert promised him to keep quiet, NPR's David Schaper reports.

Hastert is scheduled to be sentenced on Wednesday for crimes related to the hush money. He pleaded guilty to structuring cash withdrawals to get around requirements that the bank report big transactions to the federal government.

This post was updated at 6:15 p.m. ET.

More than 550,000 people have signed a pledge to boycott Target over its restroom and dressing-room policy.

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