Chris Lehman | KUOW News and Information

Chris Lehman

Chris Lehman graduated from Temple University with a journalism degree in 1997. He landed his first job less than a month later, producing arts stories for Red River Public Radio in Shreveport, Louisiana. Three years later he headed north to DeKalb, Illinois, where he worked as a reporter and announcer for NPR–affiliate WNIJ–FM. In 2006 he headed west to become the Salem Correspondent for the Northwest News Network.

Chris is a native of rural Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He was born in the upstairs bedroom of his grandmother's house, and grew up in a 230 year old log cabin in the woods. Chris traces his interest in journalism to his childhood, when his parents threatened to take away his newspaper if he didn’t do his chores.

In addition to working full time in public radio for the past decade, Chris has also reported from overseas on a free–lance basis. He's filed stories from Iraq, Burkina Faso, El Salvador, Northern Ireland, Zimbabwe and Uganda. He lives in Salem with his wife and child.

Read Chris's blog, "Capitol Currents: Dispatches From Salem."

Oregon lawmakers are returning to the State Capitol Monday for a final round of prep work before the new legislative session begins. The list of meetings gives a glimpse into what lawmakers will discuss during 2017.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has announced two new hires in her office. She also announced the departure of two staff members.

The threat of snow and freezing rain prompted a rare snow day in much of northwest Oregon. Most school districts and many government offices closed in the Willamette Valley.

Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins said she was "taken aback" by the amount of misinformation that surrounded Oregon's recent election process. In a speech at Salem City Club, Atkins said even her own Facebook friends were sharing bad information.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown rolled out a two-year spending plan Thursday at the State Capitol. The proposal tackles a $1.7 billion budget shortfall with a mix of program cuts and tax hikes.

Oregonians with disabilities will soon be able to save money without losing their state and federal benefits. That's due to a newly created program rolling out December 6.

The number of public school students in Oregon considered homeless has increased for the third year in a row. That's according to an annual report released by the state Department of Education.

When the 2017 Oregon legislature convenes in January, there will be familiar faces in most of the key leadership posts. Democrats hold a majority in both chambers, which means they can effectively choose who holds the gavel.

With Thanksgiving on the mind of most people this week, a new report shows the number of Oregonians who aren't sure where their next meal is coming from continues to rise.

According to numbers released Monday by the Oregon Secretary of State's office, about 42 percent of people who were automatically registered to vote this year did so in this month's election.

More voters cast a ballot than ever before in this month's election in Oregon. The Oregon Secretary of State's office announced Thursday that 2,022,384 voters took part.

Oregonians could be voting in two years on whether they want to remain a part of the United States. Sponsors of an initiative petition called the Oregon Secession Act submitted the initial paperwork just after Tuesday's election results became known.

Democrats now have a 30-year winning streak when it comes to the Oregon governor's office. Kate Brown easily held off Republican challenger Bud Pierce Tuesday night.

Opponents of a possible water bottling plant in the Columbia Gorge are weighing their options now that a judge has approved a water rights transfer that's key to the plant's existence.

A new state audit says the Oregon agency that monitors natural hazards has engaged in some questionable fiscal practices. The report says the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries is also taking steps to correct the problem.

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