Chris Lehman | KUOW News and Information

Chris Lehman

Chris Lehman graduated from Temple University with a journalism degree in 1997. He landed his first job less than a month later, producing arts stories for Red River Public Radio in Shreveport, Louisiana. Three years later he headed north to DeKalb, Illinois, where he worked as a reporter and announcer for NPR–affiliate WNIJ–FM. In 2006 he headed west to become the Salem Correspondent for the Northwest News Network.

Chris is a native of rural Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He was born in the upstairs bedroom of his grandmother's house, and grew up in a 230 year old log cabin in the woods. Chris traces his interest in journalism to his childhood, when his parents threatened to take away his newspaper if he didn’t do his chores.

In addition to working full time in public radio for the past decade, Chris has also reported from overseas on a free–lance basis. He's filed stories from Iraq, Burkina Faso, El Salvador, Northern Ireland, Zimbabwe and Uganda. He lives in Salem with his wife and child.

Read Chris's blog, "Capitol Currents: Dispatches From Salem."

Oregon Supreme Court Justice Jack Landau will step down at the end of this year. He announced his retirement in a letter to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown.

The credit reporting agency Equifax doesn’t have to notify the estimated 1.7 million Oregonians who may have been impacted by the company’s massive data breach.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said she requested a meeting with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions during his visit to Portland Tuesday. But she says she never got a response from Sessions or his staff.

An Oregon legislative panel came up empty Monday in its efforts to grill three former Oregon Health Authority employees. The committee wanted to ask about their role in a plan to discredit an Oregon health care nonprofit.

Supporters of a so-called “cap and invest” proposal are laying the groundwork for the Oregon Legislature to take on the issue next year.

Oregon lawmakers are returning to the Capitol Monday for a three-day flurry of meetings. It’s the first round of “Legislative Days” since the 2017 session adjourned in July.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson wants to move the state’s next presidential primary to an earlier date. Oregon currently holds its presidential primary in mid-May.

This year’s intense wildfire season in Oregon has re-ignited a long-simmering debate at the state Capitol: How to manage forests in a way that doesn’t lead to infernos.

But the politics of wildfires are complicated.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson has turned over a database of state voter information to the Trump administration.

Wildfires have consumed more than 500,000 acres in Oregon so far this year according to the Oregon Department of Forestry. The number includes blazes on both public and privately-owned land.

The Trump administration's announcement that it is phasing out the DACA program drew swift condemnation from higher education officials in Oregon Tuesday.

Hillcrest Youth Correctional Facility opened its doors in 1913. On Friday, the 104-year-old youth detention facility  in Salem, Oregon, closed for good.

The August heat set records in some Oregon cities. And not surprisingly, the hot weather was especially brutal for people who work outside.

The Oregon State Fair has been an end-of-summer tradition in Salem since 1862. This year's version kicked off Friday with the usual array of carnival rides, baby animals and junk food.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson is hearing from opponents and supporters of a proposed change to the state's initiative process that could help campaigns jump-start the signature gathering process.

An investigator for the Oregon Department of Justice is getting his job back after a state arbitrator ruled the agency was wrong to fire him.

Critics of a new Oregon law that would make it easier to get guns out of the hands of people suffering from mental health crises are gathering signatures to overturn it.

It's official: Oregon taxpayers will receive a kicker rebate. Nearly $464 million will be sent back to taxpayers when they file their state income taxes next year.

Oregonians will find out Wednesday if they'll receive a kicker rebate on their taxes next year.

The kicker is that unique Oregon institution that dishes out money to taxpayers when the state's official economists under-predict how much revenue the state will collect over a two-year period.

A count of Oregon's homeless population shows a 6 percent increase in the number of people living in shelters or on the streets. The tally takes place every two years in January and is meant to be a snapshot of a specific point in time.

Businesses across Oregon are reaping the benefits of the throngs of tourists descending on the state for the solar eclipse. But one tiny radio station in the path of totality will benefit from the eclipse in an unexpected way.

Nike co-founder Phil Knight made his largest ever donation to an Oregon political race this week. The recipient is Republican candidate for governor Knute Buehler.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown has signed into law a bill to require health insurance policies to cover the cost of abortions.

A million people may flock to Oregon over the coming week to view the total eclipse of the sun. State officials said Tuesday that they're as prepared as they can possibly be. 



Oregon Gov. Kate Brown is sending aid to help fight a 34,000-acre wildfire on the Warm Springs Reservation in central Oregon.

Oregon's capital city and the surrounding countryside are expected to be among the top destinations for eclipse watchers in Oregon. The expected influx of visitors has led local officials to beef up their emergency services for the event.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is reminding Oregon and other states with legalized recreational marijuana that federal marijuana law is still in effect.

The Oregon Senate voted Monday to extend health insurance coverage to children who are in the country illegally. The $36 million plan would enroll those children in the state's Medicaid program.

The legal age for buying tobacco products in Oregon could soon rise from 18 to 21. A measure to make that change cleared a key legislative hurdle Monday.

Oregon lawmakers have less than a week left to wrap up their work in this year's legislative session. The closing days will see a flurry of work on the state budget.

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