Carolyn Adolph | KUOW News and Information

Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Latest Award:  Runner Up, SPJ Investigative Audio Reporting with John Ryan, 2016. 

Email cadolph@kuow.org

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Photo IAM District 751

The drama over the Boeing 777X jet has claimed its first casualty.

Tom Wroblewski, president of the Machinists Union District Lodge 751, announced on Tuesday night that he is retiring to a small group of elected representatives from local lodges. His last day is Jan. 31.

Boeing Photo

Japan Airlines has yet again grounded one of its Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets after the plane's lithium ion battery started smoking.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Correction 1/15/2013: This story has been changed to reflect that construction has  eliminated a center turn lane, not reduced the lanes from four to two as originally stated.

A previous version of this story also incorrectly said construction on all of the projects would take another three years. The current lane closures are scheduled to end in December, Sound Transit expects the Capitol Hill light rail station construction to be complete by spring 2015, and the First Hill streetcar is expected to be operating by the middle of 2014. Work on the First Hill streetcar started affecting Broadway in April of 2012. The story below has been corrected.

For many of us, years of light rail construction on Broadway has been a traffic headache. But some small business owners along Capitol Hill's main street worry that ongoing construction could force them to shut their doors.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Eight union machinists have filed complaints with the National Labor Relations Board about the contract vote that determined the Boeing 777X jet would be built in Washington state.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Machinists have spoken, and the vote was 51 percent in favor of the contract extension.

After a nail-biter day of tense waiting, Machinist local Chief of Staff Jim Bearden announced the results to a small crowd of reporters gathered at the union’s Renton headquarters, as union members learned the same news next door.

IAM District 751’s Facebook page

Boeing machinists will vote Friday evening on a contract for the second time, and this time, the aerospace giant has made it clear that a yes vote guarantees Washington will keep production of the 777X in state.

Flickr Photo/Tony Cyphert

The politicians and mayors stood together to tell the union machinists that a vote for Boeing’s contract is a vote for stability for everyone. Then they said Boeing had a message.

Vimeo/Courtesy William Anthony Photography/wmanthony.com

Bill Iffrig was 15 feet from finishing the Boston Marathon in April when the first bomb went off.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

For many Boeing machinists the battle to land the 777X production line is deeply personal, and generational.

Boeing runs in the blood of many families, who have tied their fortunes to that of the company.  Andrea Simmonds’ family is like that. A grandfather of hers was a 747 pilot.  Now Odin, her husband, builds the 747. He’s a machinist, like his father Don before him, who once worked the 777 line.

Union members marched yesterday in support of taking a vote on the latest Boeing contract offer. Weakened unions have chipped away at the middle class in King County.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Machinists clashed with each other Wednesday at the union’s Everett hall asking that Boeing not require the union leadership’s endorsement in order to proceed with a vote.

About three dozen of them marched from Boeing’s main factory building to call attention to their demand for a vote on Boeing’s latest contract offer.

KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Boeing says its machinists have rejected the company’s “best and final” counterproposal.

Boeing handout

There’s a proposal on the table.

The Machinists Union says it has presented Boeing with a contract that could secure the 777X production line for the Puget Sound region.

Boeing handout

Boeing and the Machinists Union have resumed formal talks over the 777X — specifically how to keep production of the plane in Washington state.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

When the 747 jet first took off from Boeing Field in 1969, drivers on Interstate 5 were awestruck.

“People were stopped,” said Barry Latter, a docent at the Museum of Flight and former Boeing engineer. “They’d parked their cars on the side of the freeway, and they were looking down at the airplane, saying something this big can’t fly.”

Workers and labor activists demonstrate outside the U.S. District Courthouse in support of the city's $15 an hour minimum wage
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Fast food workers and advocates for a higher minimum wage marched from the City of SeaTac to Seattle today as a part of a national day of demonstrations.

Voters in SeaTac this fall narrowly passed a ballot measure to raise the minimum wage to $15 for some workers in transportation and hospitality businesses within city limits. Now, organizers of the march want that expanded to other areas too, and they have support beyond the workers.

Flickr Photo/Alan Turkus

Three weeks after Election Day, supporters of a measure to increase the minimum hourly wage to $15 in SeaTac celebrated their victory. With the last batch of votes counted, King County declared the proposition had passed with more than 1 percent of the vote.

Boeing handout.

In the hours after Boeing machinists overwhelmingly voted down an eight-year contract, a theme emerged: The machinists view themselves as a family that could not vote for a contract that would hurt future generations.

Boeing said Thursday it has no further plans to negotiate with its Machinists after the union voted against a  contract extension Boeing said was key to its decision to build the 777X in the Puget Sound region. Now the company said it is looking at other locations. It said it would continue to consider the Puget Sound region, but as part of a competition with other places.

KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

In a vote that could ultimately move Boeing out of Washington state, Boeing's machinists rejected the company's proposed contract, with 67 percent of union members opposed.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Standing before a crowd of Boeing machinists on Thursday night, Tom Wroblewski, president of the Boeing machinists union, tore up a copy of the proposed contract and said he would try to stop it from coming to a vote.

“I know this is a piece of crap,” Wroblewski said, according to The Seattle Times.

The machinists before him were openly hostile to the eight-year deal, which would replace their health care costs and strip down their pensions.

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Microsoft stock rose 6 percent after an earnings report that had analysts cheering. The Redmond, Wash.-based employer has been struggling to change as consumers move away from computers and toward mobile devices.

Flickr Photo/Alan Turkus

Suwanee Pringle, a worker at a shop at Sea-Tac International Airport, lights up at the mention of Proposition 1, which would raise her wage to $15 an hour.

"I’m really going to be happy, " Pringle said. "So I can afford to pay all my bills. Now I cannot afford to eat. I eat a cup of noodles even though I work so hard."

Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan

Microsoft servers around the world are dishing out a new version of Windows 8. The new version brings back a start button, something users said they missed.

A lot is riding on the success of the operating system, which is the backbone of Microsoft’s transformation into a devices company. It’s Microsoft’s effort to create a single experience for all Microsoft devices, from smartphone to tablet to laptop.

Flickr Photo/Drewski2112

A 440-foot superyacht named Serene is approaching a deadline date with Washington’s tax authorities.

If it cruises through that deadline by staying longer than 60 days, its owners will have to pay 10 percent of the yacht’s value, which is $30 million. 

Flickr Photo/Marina Noordegraaf

The mood was somber at Employment Security Department offices across the state on Tuesday, as hundreds of workers found themselves in the position of those they usually help: Out of work.

Although employees of the state, 900 workers have been furloughed or lost hours because their pay comes from federal government sources. They will remain without pay until the impasse in Washington, D.C., ends.

The production line at a Boeing facility.
Courtesy/Boeing Company

Governor Jay Inslee said on Wednesday that he will propose to extend tax breaks to Boeing -- so long as the aerospace giant agrees to build the 777X in Washington.

Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC-BY-NC-ND)
Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Construction is now the fastest-growing industry in Washington state. Construction cranes fill the skyline. Public works projects like light rail lines and the tunnel project snarl our streets. But despite appearances, construction has not yet fully recovered from the 2008 recession.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The economic future of this region is still tied to the future of  Boeing, the region's bellwether employer.  The aerospace industry pays 7.5 percent of the wages in Washington state, and Boeing remains the region’s largest private employer, with 85,000 local jobs.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

All Nippon Airways is preparing to announce a decision that could mark a turning point in the battle between Airbus and Boeing. The Japanese airline wants to buy 25 new planes worth an estimated $7 billion. It will choose between Boeing Co.’s 777X and Airbus SAS’s A350, both wide-body planes.

Flickr Photo/Jeni Rodger

Facebook and Yahoo have joined Microsoft and Google in asking the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court for permission to tell the public about personal information they give to spy agencies.

The big four companies are responding to persistent reports that spy agencies are using them to grab users’ personal information.

In the FISA court filings, Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo and Google say their reputations have been damaged. They say only a small part of Internet traffic is being handed to spy agencies, and they want to give the public information to correct the record.

The Justice Department says it can’t allow that for national security reasons.

The companies say that gag order violates their free-speech rights. Microsoft and Google are asking the FISA court to allow oral arguments so that they can argue their case in public.

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