Carolyn Adolph | KUOW News and Information

Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Latest Award:  Runner Up, SPJ Investigative Audio Reporting with John Ryan, 2016. 

Email cadolph@kuow.org

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King County

King County is seeking federal funding for an updated map of landslide hazards, and is considering the possibility of using this map to provide the public information about buildings at risk.

Flickr Photo/Roderick Yang (CC-BY-NC-ND)

CenturyLink has given Washington state investigators an explanation for the six-hour 911 service outage earlier this month that prevented 4,500 emergency calls from getting through.

In a report filed with Washington's Utilities and Transportation Commission, the company says the calls got stuck at a routing center in Colorado.

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Microsoft says its purchase of Nokia's mobile phone business is complete. The deal is meant to help Microsoft deliver a Windows phone to challenge Apple and Google. However the company said it's only the first step in a journey to bring the two organizations together as one team.

Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Boeing announced quarterly earnings Wednesday morning that beat analysts' expectations. CEO Jim McNerney said part of the company's success story is the new economics of its labor force.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Federal and county prosecutors issued a warning to people who might use the Oso disaster for their own personal gain. They said they are watching for people who rip off donors or take advantage of victims.

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

The shock is wearing off in Darrington and Oso.

Nearly a month after the devastating mudslide destroyed a neighborhood and wiped out the highway between the two towns, people are trying to find a "new normal" in a place where nothing will be the same again.

Courtesy of WeWork

The millennial generation is taking control over how they work and how they live. The group, currently about 18 to 33 years old, is adopting technology that is disrupting old structures and writing the playbook on how to take advantage of technological change.

EPA Photo

The Environmental Protection Agency is working to remove hundreds of containers of hazardous chemicals from a Craftsman home in Seattle's Green Lake neighborhood.

Flickr Photo/vmax137 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The cost of housing in the city is making many people think small, to embrace the micro movement that loves to reuse and recycle. Enter the idea of a shipping container as a building — a natural in a port city like Seattle, which handles 1.6 million container units in a year.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The catastrophic mudflow that destroyed lives and homes a week and a half ago has come to be known as the Oso Landslide. That's led many to think the town has been wiped away.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

People in the town of Darrington struggled Monday to comprehend the scope of the disaster just a few miles from them. The people who lived in the homes destroyed by Saturday's devastating mudflow are friends, relatives and neighbors.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington’s Employment Security Department says the state now has more people working than before the start of the Great Recession.

It's an important milestone in the recovery. And though it comes as a result of genuine progress, it received an assist from a federal benchmarking that showed the state didn’t lose as many jobs as originally thought.

From Honda of Seattle's Facebook page.

The rise in Seattle’s downtown density makes for scarce real estate and higher prices. As a result, one industry is heading south to the Sodo neighborhood: car dealerships.

Sodo has space and easy highway access, but it isn’t perfect. The high traffic can be a plus, but with three professional sports teams in the area, game days can be intense.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says it will have to wait until sometime in 2016 to turn a profit on the 787 Dreamliners line.

By that time, the aerospace says developing the game-changing plane will cost the company more than $25 billion. There was a time when Boeing thought it would take $5 billion to develop the new plane.

Courtesy of Microsoft

Microsoft is celebrating a new leader: Satya Nadella is the company's third chief executive. Nadella likes cricket, and he quoted Oscar Wilde in his email to employees Tuesday. And for Seattle's Indian community, his appointment to the top job means a lot.

KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

It feels great to win the Super Bowl, especially if you sell beer, T-shirts or season tickets. But that's not what people mean when they talk about a boost to the region's economy. And when you consider the businesses that will close for Wednesday's parade and the employees who will disappear to see that parade, there may even be a downside to winning the Super Bowl.

Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The idea of coming together in common cause is woven into Washington’s social fabric, especially into its union history. But labor has suffered reversals before, and it suffered a large one on Jan. 3, when the Machinists union voted by a narrow margin to abandon the Boeing pension plan. At stake was a key production line.

Photo IAM District 751

The drama over the Boeing 777X jet has claimed its first casualty.

Tom Wroblewski, president of the Machinists Union District Lodge 751, announced on Tuesday night that he is retiring to a small group of elected representatives from local lodges. His last day is Jan. 31.

Boeing Photo

Japan Airlines has yet again grounded one of its Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets after the plane's lithium ion battery started smoking.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Correction 1/15/2013: This story has been changed to reflect that construction has  eliminated a center turn lane, not reduced the lanes from four to two as originally stated.

A previous version of this story also incorrectly said construction on all of the projects would take another three years. The current lane closures are scheduled to end in December, Sound Transit expects the Capitol Hill light rail station construction to be complete by spring 2015, and the First Hill streetcar is expected to be operating by the middle of 2014. Work on the First Hill streetcar started affecting Broadway in April of 2012. The story below has been corrected.

For many of us, years of light rail construction on Broadway has been a traffic headache. But some small business owners along Capitol Hill's main street worry that ongoing construction could force them to shut their doors.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Eight union machinists have filed complaints with the National Labor Relations Board about the contract vote that determined the Boeing 777X jet would be built in Washington state.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Machinists have spoken, and the vote was 51 percent in favor of the contract extension.

After a nail-biter day of tense waiting, Machinist local Chief of Staff Jim Bearden announced the results to a small crowd of reporters gathered at the union’s Renton headquarters, as union members learned the same news next door.

IAM District 751’s Facebook page

Boeing machinists will vote Friday evening on a contract for the second time, and this time, the aerospace giant has made it clear that a yes vote guarantees Washington will keep production of the 777X in state.

Flickr Photo/Tony Cyphert

The politicians and mayors stood together to tell the union machinists that a vote for Boeing’s contract is a vote for stability for everyone. Then they said Boeing had a message.

Vimeo/Courtesy William Anthony Photography/wmanthony.com

Bill Iffrig was 15 feet from finishing the Boston Marathon in April when the first bomb went off.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

For many Boeing machinists the battle to land the 777X production line is deeply personal, and generational.

Boeing runs in the blood of many families, who have tied their fortunes to that of the company.  Andrea Simmonds’ family is like that. A grandfather of hers was a 747 pilot.  Now Odin, her husband, builds the 747. He’s a machinist, like his father Don before him, who once worked the 777 line.

Union members marched yesterday in support of taking a vote on the latest Boeing contract offer. Weakened unions have chipped away at the middle class in King County.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Machinists clashed with each other Wednesday at the union’s Everett hall asking that Boeing not require the union leadership’s endorsement in order to proceed with a vote.

About three dozen of them marched from Boeing’s main factory building to call attention to their demand for a vote on Boeing’s latest contract offer.

KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Boeing says its machinists have rejected the company’s “best and final” counterproposal.

Boeing handout

There’s a proposal on the table.

The Machinists Union says it has presented Boeing with a contract that could secure the 777X production line for the Puget Sound region.

Boeing handout

Boeing and the Machinists Union have resumed formal talks over the 777X — specifically how to keep production of the plane in Washington state.

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