Carolyn Adolph | KUOW News and Information

Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Latest Award:  Runner Up, SPJ Investigative Audio Reporting with John Ryan, 2016. 

Email cadolph@kuow.org

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Flickr Photo/Chris Hardie

Reports from the New York Times, the Guardian and ProPublica cast light on how spy agencies are obtaining private data. The news organizations say the US National Security Agency is using covert partnerships with technology companies to weaken encryption software.

Flickr Photo/Marcin Wichary

Google officially launched construction of a new building to double its campus in Kirkland.

The Seattle area is already home to the third-largest Google center in the US, behind New York City and Mountain View, California. Google says it’s expanding here because it likes the talent coming out of nearby universities. It is not saying how much it intends to grow its workforce in Kirkland.

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Microsoft’s $7 billion purchase of Nokia’s mobile device business is an important step toward gaining ground in the worldwide smartphone market, analysts say.

But bigger challenges await as the company works to get consumers to love the Windows Phone.

Jake Warga / KUOW

One of the world’s largest ships arrived at the Port of Tacoma Sunday morning.

The Zim Djibouti slipped in at dawn, carrying loads of goods for big box stores. The vessel is 10,000 TEUs in size, meaning it holds 5,000 shipping containers. When the Zim Djibouti appeared on Sunday, fresh from a port in Vancouver, B.C., containers were 18 across on its upper deck.

The ship is part of a new wave of cargo ships emerging from Asian shipyards. They’re super-sized to save fuel costs.

AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Families of some passengers who were harmed in the Asiana Airlines flight that crashed at San Francisco Airport last month are suing Boeing as well as the airline.  The suits say Boeing bears some responsibility if Asiana pilots were not sufficiently trained to fly the 777, the plane involved in the accident. 

Boeing said it would not respond to questions about the lawsuits.

AP Photo/Charles Cherney

Former Seattle Mariner Alex Rodriguez has been suspended for using performance-enhancing drugs. 
Rodriguez, also known as A-Rod, is suspended for the rest of this season and the next. He can play while he appeals.

Flickr Photo/photologue_np

People on unemployment in this state stand to lose nine weeks of federal support starting in August as the federal government trims support to states with higher employment.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Everyone knows that an earthquake or volcanic eruption could shake our region at any time. The question is how people will cope with a disaster and its aftermath.

Some people are thinking bicycles could be part of the answer. On Friday, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways sponsored the first Seattle Disaster Relief Trials at the University of Washington to see what could be carried on a cargo bike in rough conditions.

Wikipedia Photo

This week’s Paris Air Show is all about big planes, but a small deal announced this week is gaining attention.

Bombardier Inc. announced Horizon Air, a subsidiary of Alaska Airlines, will buy three of the manufacturer's Q400 NextGen planes. Alaska Airlines is buying more Q400s so it can expand turbo-prop service. The airline recently announced the first route in Alaska – from Fairbanks to Anchorage – where Q400s will replace a Boeing 737 jet.

Credit Airbus Industrie

The Paris Air Show opens today. It’s where manufacturers show off their new planes – and where Boeing and Airbus try to best each other.

Courtesy of the National Park Service

The National Park Service said Tuesday it is increasing safety training and altering some rescue techniques in the wake of the death of ranger Nick Hall on Mt. Rainier last June.

Park Service officials made the recommendations following a report released Tuesday, detailing the incident. As a result of the review, they said the Park Service would begin favoring a technique that puts the ranger on a wire dangling from a helicopter, instead of on the ground battling a rescue litter.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The Sacramento Kings will stay in Sacramento. NBA owners met in Dallas Wednesday and overwhelmingly rejected an effort by investor Chris Hansen to move the team to Seattle.

Courtesy Otis Williams

The NBA’s Board of Governors meets in Dallas Wednesday to decide whether the Sacramento Kings move to Seattle. Until a few days ago, it seemed clear that the answer was no. In a key decision two weeks ago a committee of the NBA voted unanimously to keep the team in Sacramento.

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

The State Department is asking that North Korea free Kenneth Bae, a man from Lynnwood, Wash. who was sentenced to 15 years hard labor Wednesday. North Korea had accused Bae of plotting to overthrow its government.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

This story was last updated on Saturday, April 20, 2013.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed it has accepted Boeing's proposed fix to the 787 battery system. It says next week it will issue instructions to operators for making changes to the aircraft.

There's a new reason to file your taxes early next year: you might thwart an identity thief.

Identity thieves have used stolen information to beat victims to their tax filings. They file false reports, get large refunds and create a mess for the real taxpayer.

File Photo Courtesy Boeing

Boeing's 787 certification flight has landed.

The flight was Boeing's final certification test for the battery system it redesigned following smoke and fire incidents in January. Boeing Co. said the test would show the Federal Aviation Administration that the new system performs as intended "during normal and non-normal flight conditions."

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says a 787 Dreamliner destined for LOT Polish Airlines will take the certification test that could return the 787 fleet to the skies worldwide.

Boeing

The Boeing Co. unveiled what executives called a "proposed permanent solution to the 787 battery issue" Thursday  night. The company’s 787 fleet has been grounded for two months because of safety concerns over the plane’s lithium-ion batteries. Two batteries in the fleet’s first 50 planes have had smoke and fire incidents.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

Last Updated: March 12, 2013 5:30 p.m. 

In a statement, the FAA said Boeing could go ahead with its plan to test a redesigned battery system for the 787. The FAA also gave the green light to limited flights for two aircraft that will have test versions of the new systems.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

  The National Transportation Safety Board says it still does not know the root cause of the battery fire that triggered the grounding of the Boeing Co. 787 fleet.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Halfway through the enrollment season for Washington's Guaranteed Tuition Savings program, the number of new enrollments is lagging compared to the last two years. Consumer confidence in the program is slipping, at least for now, even as state lawmakers express their concerns about the $600 million shortfall in the program.  

In Seattle, NTSB investigators and Boeing engineers examine the type of lithium ion battery used on the Boeing 787 to start the auxillary power unit and to provide backup power for flight critical systems.
courtesy National Transportation Safety Board

The hunt for a solution to the 787’s battery woes continues. Investigators are crisscrossing oceans looking for a cause to the battery overheating problems that have grounded the Dreamliner since January 16. Teams of investigators are fanning out and crossing paths.

Boeing 787
AP Photo/Stephan Savoia / Associated Press

The Boeing Co. said today that there has been no negative financial impact as a result of the FAA's grounding of the 787 Dreamliner. The news dampened a wave of speculation over the potential cost of its safety troubles with its 787 which was grounded two weeks ago.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

The Boeing 787’s lithium-ion batteries are now the subject of intense scrutiny. The Federal Aviation Administration has grounded the entire 787 fleet in the US until it can get to the root cause of a fire hazard involving the batteries.

Federal regulators are pledging a full-scale review of the design and build of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In a news conference, the Federal Aviation Administration said it will get to the root cause of a set of problems, including last week’s fire on a Dreamliner at Boston's Logan Airport.

Associated Press

A Washington family is scheduled to return home Saturday with days to spare before a new Russian law bans American families from adopting Russian children.

Christopher Clow
Carolyn Adolph / KUOW

Correction: This story has been corrected to show that of the 120,000 people who were cut off unemployment benefits before they found a job from summer to 2008 to November 2012, 70 percent have not yet found work.

A program Congress has extended 10 times over the last four years is expected to end this month. The emergency unemployment compensation program has been a safety net for 400,000 people in Washington since the summer of 2008. Four years later 70 percent of people who were cut off from benefits before they found work are still looking. That's about 84,000 people.

blue faucet
blockpartypress / Creative Commons - flickr

Last Tuesday's general election marked a decisive moment for the city of Shoreline: 70 percent of voters there agreed to buy water services back from the city of Seattle and create their own water utility. 

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