Carolyn Adolph | KUOW News and Information

Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Latest Award:  Runner Up, SPJ Investigative Audio Reporting with John Ryan, 2016. 

Email cadolph@kuow.org

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traffic commute transportation car
Flickr Photo/JBLM (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It should only take half an hour to drive between Everett and Seattle on Interstate 5, which was possible during the holidays.

But it’s back to reality now, and the regular commute can take longer than an hour.

Inside Everett's Boeing factory.
Flickr Photo/Jetstar Airways (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It was a year of soaring profits for Boeing and Microsoft, rapid expansion for Amazon and anguish for Boeing machinists. KUOW's economy reporter Carolyn Adolph tells Bill Radke how the Puget Sound region's major employers fared in 2014.

A Washington State ferry travels to Friday Harbor.
Flickr Photo/James N (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Travelers to the San Juan Islands have always had to cope with uncertainty. Up to now there’s been no way to guarantee a spot on a particular ferry.

But Washington ferries are now taking reservations for the San Juan Islands. The first ferries to fill up under the new system leave Monday morning.

It was open season on the pineapple in ski country last week. Crystal Mountain posted a video bemoaning a recent run of warm, wet weather known as the pineapple express.
Screenshot from Vimeo

This year’s ski season is getting off to a slow start thanks to an old skiers’ nemesis: the pineapple express.

Unusually warm and wet weather has been washing away the snow on the region’s ski hills. Fresh snow finally started falling over the weekend.

But not before some innocent pineapples had to die.

The Boeing 787 lands at Seattle's Boeing Field after its maiden flight from Paine Field in Everett.
The Boeing Company

Five years ago this Monday, Boeing's 787 flew for the first time. The Dreamliner, billed as Boeing's game-changing plane, roared into the sky above Everett at 10:27 a.m.

Now another milestone approaches: Boeing says 2015 is the year it makes its first profit per plane on the 787 line.

NTSB's Joseph Kolly, holds an fire-damaged battery casing from the Japan Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner that caught fire at Boston's Logan Airport, at the NTSB laboratory in Washington, D.C., Jan. 24, 2013.
AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

A report from the National Transportation Safety Board says Boeing, its contractors and the Federal Aviation Administration share the blame for a fire in a 787's lithium-ion battery at Boston's Logan Airport two years ago. That fire was one of two incidents that led to the grounding of the Dreamliner fleet in 2013.

The NTSB said the fire on the tarmac at Boston Logan was the result of a short-circuit in a single battery cell. It resulted in smoke, which Boeing said would be a one in 10 million event. But then it spread to other cells, causing a wave of extreme heat known as a thermal runaway and fire.

A study says that iPhone's Siri program -- which can be used without hands or eyes -- is a huge distraction for drivers.
Flickr Photo/Elizabeth Press (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission is taking another run at an expanded distracted driving law. A proposed bill is sitting at the governor’s office now. The legislation would expand the current ban on texting or holding a handset to the ear to include touching a mobile device while driving.

Though the proposal addresses more of the ways people are interacting with their devices, it leaves out one major distraction:  Siri.

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A fourth victim has died of his injuries from the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooting.

Andrew Fryberg, 15, died of a gunshot wound to the head on Friday evening, according to Harborview Medical Center – exactly two weeks after the Oct. 24 shooting.

Frank Rivas, Marysville
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Tuesday is the first day of actual classes for students of Marysville-Pilchuck High School. On Monday, students were bused to the school for a shortened day. It was the first time since the shooting on October 24 that the school community had come together.

KUOW Photo

The Snohomish County medical examiner has still not identified the teen girl who died in Friday's shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School on Friday.

Police have interviewed more than 100 eyewitnesses to the shooting at the school's cafeteria.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Four young people are in intensive care following a shooting in a Marysville high school cafeteria. And two young people are dead.

One, a girl. The other, the alleged shooter. Police have yet to confirm his identity.

KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph reports.

Flickr Photo/Mike Mozart (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Staff at JCPenney in Bellevue are preparing for the store’s closure. In November the store ends its 59-year run in Bellevue Square.

JCPenney, a flagship of the middle class, has been struggling for years. The Texas-based retailer closed 33 under-performing stores across the country earlier this year. Then in September it added Bellevue to the list.

Flickr Photo/ghindo

Rollout of Seattle's $15 minimum wage is still half a year away, and Seattle's auditor says the city is already learning lessons about how to enforce workplace laws.

Flickr Photo/javacolleen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle’s HomeStreet Bank has sold a quarter of its mortgage-servicing business to a bank in Atlanta. It’s a sale that moves $3 billlion worth of mortgage relationships out of state. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph about an unusual problem food banks are facing: too many cans, not enough can openers. The US government is buying five times more canned pink salmon than usual in order keep the price of salmon from falling too low. This helps support the fishing industry and the canned fish is eventually sent to food banks.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is on a salmon-buying binge.  It usually spends $6 million a year buying pink salmon. This summer, it is spending a total $39 million.

After Oso, Reborn From Water And Mud

Sep 21, 2014
Return to Oso
KCTS Photo/Stacey Jenkins

Robin Youngblood cherished the nature around her home in Oso’s Steelhead Haven. When the landslide struck, she and a visiting friend were talking about a deer they had just seen. After the disaster, she left the Oso area. But something called her back. Now she lives a stone’s throw from state Route 530, a few miles east of the slide.

NASA announced the winners of its hotly-contested contract to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station.

Boeing was the big winner.

The company's space unit will be paid more than four billion dollars to deliver and certify its Crew Space Transportation Capsule.

A little over half that will be paid to Boeing's competitor Space X for its own version, called the Dragon.

Mike Fincke is a former International Space Station crew member.

At a news conference Tuesday, Fincke said having two competing capsules will be good for crew safety.

Washington state ferries has a new boss.

She's Lynne Griffith, who is currently the chief executive of Pierce County transit.

And a memo from her new boss to the governor indicates her marching orders.

KUOW's Carolyn Adolph reports.

TRANSCRIPT

In the memo, transportation secretary Lynn Peterson tells the governor that the goal is to stop missing sailings.

Ninety-nine trips were canceled last year because of lack of available crew.

Peterson wants those trips to proceed - only with fewer passengers.

File photo of the Port of Seattle.
Courtesy of the Port of Seattle

The Port of Seattle is getting $20 million dollars in federal investment to help the Port prepare Terminal 46 for the arrival of the next wave of mega-ships.

Flickr Photo/Nicola

In several weeks, there will be no more Elliott’s Oysters for us. And it will be hard to “keep clam” on Seattle’s waterfront.

That’s because, after years of planning, the Alaskan Way seawall is finally about to be rebuilt.

Weyerhaeuser  Co. is leaving Federal Way.

It's moving its head office to Seattle's Pioneer Square.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is expected to make the announcement later this afternoon.

In a statement Tuesday, Weyerhaeuser said its campus in Federal Way no longer fit the company's needs.

Wikimedia Commons

European news media are reporting that Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has chartered a luxury yacht owned by Stolichnaya vodka magnate Yuri Scheffler.

The yacht, named Serene, is the third-largest superyacht in the world. The cost of chartering the boat runs around $2.1 million a week, according to Yacht Charter Fleet. That's roughly $212 a minute.

Gates and his family are vacationing in Sardinia. They are reportedly using the yacht's helicopter to go ashore for tennis.

Seattle is having a good year for exports. Boeing has a backlog that will keep it making planes for years. Smaller companies tied to the export market are also doing well.

And they would like to keep it that way.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington’s ferry fleet is among the largest and oldest in the country. Last week we learned just how vulnerable it is when, at the height of tourist season, one of the ferries broke down.

Buying a new ferry isn’t like buying a new car, however. The next ferry due to hit the docks is the Samish, under construction at the Vigor shipyard on Harbor Island. It should be in service early next year.

The production line at a Boeing facility.
Courtesy/Boeing Company

South Carolina has won the exclusive right to build the 787-10, the longest version yet of the Dreamliner. The decision means South Carolina will make as many Dreamliners as Washington state does by the end of the decade.

Cannabis City has sold out of its indicas, sativas and hybrids.

No more marijuana for sale until July 21, according to a sign hung on the door of Seattle's first recreational pot store.

File photo of traffic on Seattle's Ship Canal Bridge.
Flickr Photo/Lonnon Foster (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It’s been a bad summer for driving in Seattle.

Several accidents have shown us that surface streets cannot handle the traffic load when Interstate 5 or Highway 99 choke up. Traffic and design issues on major routes have been difficult even without an accident.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

It was a false countdown to high noon, when Cannabis City, a store in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood, was supposed to start selling marijuana.

This is Washington state’s final weekend without recreational pot stores. On Monday, the Evergreen State joins Colorado in issuing business licenses to qualifying retailers. It's expected about 20 licenses will be issued including one to a shop in Sodo called Cannabis City.

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