Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Carolyn Adolph is the Economy reporter at KUOW. She is interested in the forces that affect the fortunes of Seattle-area employers and how those employers are transforming life as we know it.

With this assignment Carolyn's career comes full circle. She began with the Reuters wire, filing business stories to international markets. She graduated to business reporting for major daily newspapers in Toronto and Montreal. She held health and higher education reporting jobs before switching to radio. Her first assigned radio reporting day was September 11, 2001, when the assignment and life changed irretrievably. At the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation she covered Ottawa's major industry: government. She remembers fun work covering English-French issues and needing to own a floor-length gown.

Carolyn joined KUOW in 2008 and built the station's source bank, the Public Insight Network.

Email cadolph@kuow.org

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Aid agencies are reducing their presence in Oso and Darrington, a month and a half after a landslide hit the small community there, killing at least 41.

King County

King County is seeking federal funding for an updated map of landslide hazards, and is considering the possibility of using this map to provide the public information about buildings at risk.

Flickr Photo/Roderick Yang (CC-BY-NC-ND)

CenturyLink has given Washington state investigators an explanation for the six-hour 911 service outage earlier this month that prevented 4,500 emergency calls from getting through.

In a report filed with Washington's Utilities and Transportation Commission, the company says the calls got stuck at a routing center in Colorado.

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Microsoft says its purchase of Nokia's mobile phone business is complete. The deal is meant to help Microsoft deliver a Windows phone to challenge Apple and Google. However the company said it's only the first step in a journey to bring the two organizations together as one team.

Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)

Boeing announced quarterly earnings Wednesday morning that beat analysts' expectations. CEO Jim McNerney said part of the company's success story is the new economics of its labor force.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Federal and county prosecutors issued a warning to people who might use the Oso disaster for their own personal gain. They said they are watching for people who rip off donors or take advantage of victims.

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

The shock is wearing off in Darrington and Oso.

Nearly a month after the devastating mudslide destroyed a neighborhood and wiped out the highway between the two towns, people are trying to find a "new normal" in a place where nothing will be the same again.

Courtesy of WeWork

The millennial generation is taking control over how they work and how they live. The group, currently about 18 to 33 years old, is adopting technology that is disrupting old structures and writing the playbook on how to take advantage of technological change.

EPA Photo

The Environmental Protection Agency is working to remove hundreds of containers of hazardous chemicals from a Craftsman home in Seattle's Green Lake neighborhood.

Flickr Photo/vmax137 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The cost of housing in the city is making many people think small, to embrace the micro movement that loves to reuse and recycle. Enter the idea of a shipping container as a building — a natural in a port city like Seattle, which handles 1.6 million container units in a year.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The catastrophic mudflow that destroyed lives and homes a week and a half ago has come to be known as the Oso Landslide. That's led many to think the town has been wiped away.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

People in the town of Darrington struggled Monday to comprehend the scope of the disaster just a few miles from them. The people who lived in the homes destroyed by Saturday's devastating mudflow are friends, relatives and neighbors.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington’s Employment Security Department says the state now has more people working than before the start of the Great Recession.

It's an important milestone in the recovery. And though it comes as a result of genuine progress, it received an assist from a federal benchmarking that showed the state didn’t lose as many jobs as originally thought.

From Honda of Seattle's Facebook page.

The rise in Seattle’s downtown density makes for scarce real estate and higher prices. As a result, one industry is heading south to the Sodo neighborhood: car dealerships.

Sodo has space and easy highway access, but it isn’t perfect. The high traffic can be a plus, but with three professional sports teams in the area, game days can be intense.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says it will have to wait until sometime in 2016 to turn a profit on the 787 Dreamliners line.

By that time, the aerospace says developing the game-changing plane will cost the company more than $25 billion. There was a time when Boeing thought it would take $5 billion to develop the new plane.

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