Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Carolyn Adolph is the economics reporter at KUOW. She is interested in the forces that affect the fortunes of Seattle-area employers and how those employers are transforming life as we know it.

With this assignment Carolyn's career comes full circle. She began with the Reuters wire, filing business stories to international markets. She graduated to business reporting for major daily newspapers in Toronto and Montreal. She held health and higher education reporting jobs before switching to radio. Her first assigned radio reporting day was September 11, 2001, when the assignment and life changed irretrievably. At the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation she covered Ottawa's major industry: government. She remembers fun work covering English-French issues and needing to own a floor-length gown.

Carolyn joined KUOW in 2008 and built the station's source bank, the Public Insight Network.

Email cadolph@kuow.org

Ways To Connect

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

The shock is wearing off in Darrington and Oso.

Nearly a month after the devastating mudslide destroyed a neighborhood and wiped out the highway between the two towns, people are trying to find a "new normal" in a place where nothing will be the same again.

Courtesy of WeWork

The millennial generation is taking control over how they work and how they live. The group, currently about 18 to 33 years old, is adopting technology that is disrupting old structures and writing the playbook on how to take advantage of technological change.

EPA Photo

The Environmental Protection Agency is working to remove hundreds of containers of hazardous chemicals from a Craftsman home in Seattle's Green Lake neighborhood.

Flickr Photo/vmax137 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The cost of housing in the city is making many people think small, to embrace the micro movement that loves to reuse and recycle. Enter the idea of a shipping container as a building — a natural in a port city like Seattle, which handles 1.6 million container units in a year.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The catastrophic mudflow that destroyed lives and homes a week and a half ago has come to be known as the Oso Landslide. That's led many to think the town has been wiped away.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

People in the town of Darrington struggled Monday to comprehend the scope of the disaster just a few miles from them. The people who lived in the homes destroyed by Saturday's devastating mudflow are friends, relatives and neighbors.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington’s Employment Security Department says the state now has more people working than before the start of the Great Recession.

It's an important milestone in the recovery. And though it comes as a result of genuine progress, it received an assist from a federal benchmarking that showed the state didn’t lose as many jobs as originally thought.

From Honda of Seattle's Facebook page.

The rise in Seattle’s downtown density makes for scarce real estate and higher prices. As a result, one industry is heading south to the Sodo neighborhood: car dealerships.

Sodo has space and easy highway access, but it isn’t perfect. The high traffic can be a plus, but with three professional sports teams in the area, game days can be intense.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says it will have to wait until sometime in 2016 to turn a profit on the 787 Dreamliners line.

By that time, the aerospace says developing the game-changing plane will cost the company more than $25 billion. There was a time when Boeing thought it would take $5 billion to develop the new plane.

Courtesy of Microsoft

Microsoft is celebrating a new leader: Satya Nadella is the company's third chief executive. Nadella likes cricket, and he quoted Oscar Wilde in his email to employees Tuesday. And for Seattle's Indian community, his appointment to the top job means a lot.

KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

It feels great to win the Super Bowl, especially if you sell beer, T-shirts or season tickets. But that's not what people mean when they talk about a boost to the region's economy. And when you consider the businesses that will close for Wednesday's parade and the employees who will disappear to see that parade, there may even be a downside to winning the Super Bowl.

Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The idea of coming together in common cause is woven into Washington’s social fabric, especially into its union history. But labor has suffered reversals before, and it suffered a large one on Jan. 3, when the Machinists union voted by a narrow margin to abandon the Boeing pension plan. At stake was a key production line.

Photo IAM District 751

The drama over the Boeing 777X jet has claimed its first casualty.

Tom Wroblewski, president of the Machinists Union District Lodge 751, announced on Tuesday night that he is retiring to a small group of elected representatives from local lodges. His last day is Jan. 31.

Boeing Photo

Japan Airlines has yet again grounded one of its Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets after the plane's lithium ion battery started smoking.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Correction 1/15/2013: This story has been changed to reflect that construction has  eliminated a center turn lane, not reduced the lanes from four to two as originally stated.

A previous version of this story also incorrectly said construction on all of the projects would take another three years. The current lane closures are scheduled to end in December, Sound Transit expects the Capitol Hill light rail station construction to be complete by spring 2015, and the First Hill streetcar is expected to be operating by the middle of 2014. Work on the First Hill streetcar started affecting Broadway in April of 2012. The story below has been corrected.

For many of us, years of light rail construction on Broadway has been a traffic headache. But some small business owners along Capitol Hill's main street worry that ongoing construction could force them to shut their doors.

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