Carolyn Adolph | KUOW News and Information

Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Awards:  Finalist, PRINDI Award for Breaking News, 2014  

Email cadolph@kuow.org

Ways to Connect

There's a new reason to file your taxes early next year: you might thwart an identity thief.

Identity thieves have used stolen information to beat victims to their tax filings. They file false reports, get large refunds and create a mess for the real taxpayer.

File Photo Courtesy Boeing

Boeing's 787 certification flight has landed.

The flight was Boeing's final certification test for the battery system it redesigned following smoke and fire incidents in January. Boeing Co. said the test would show the Federal Aviation Administration that the new system performs as intended "during normal and non-normal flight conditions."

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says a 787 Dreamliner destined for LOT Polish Airlines will take the certification test that could return the 787 fleet to the skies worldwide.

Boeing

The Boeing Co. unveiled what executives called a "proposed permanent solution to the 787 battery issue" Thursday  night. The company’s 787 fleet has been grounded for two months because of safety concerns over the plane’s lithium-ion batteries. Two batteries in the fleet’s first 50 planes have had smoke and fire incidents.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

Last Updated: March 12, 2013 5:30 p.m. 

In a statement, the FAA said Boeing could go ahead with its plan to test a redesigned battery system for the 787. The FAA also gave the green light to limited flights for two aircraft that will have test versions of the new systems.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

  The National Transportation Safety Board says it still does not know the root cause of the battery fire that triggered the grounding of the Boeing Co. 787 fleet.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Halfway through the enrollment season for Washington's Guaranteed Tuition Savings program, the number of new enrollments is lagging compared to the last two years. Consumer confidence in the program is slipping, at least for now, even as state lawmakers express their concerns about the $600 million shortfall in the program.  

In Seattle, NTSB investigators and Boeing engineers examine the type of lithium ion battery used on the Boeing 787 to start the auxillary power unit and to provide backup power for flight critical systems.
courtesy National Transportation Safety Board

The hunt for a solution to the 787’s battery woes continues. Investigators are crisscrossing oceans looking for a cause to the battery overheating problems that have grounded the Dreamliner since January 16. Teams of investigators are fanning out and crossing paths.

Boeing 787
AP Photo/Stephan Savoia / Associated Press

The Boeing Co. said today that there has been no negative financial impact as a result of the FAA's grounding of the 787 Dreamliner. The news dampened a wave of speculation over the potential cost of its safety troubles with its 787 which was grounded two weeks ago.

charred battery
NTSB Photo

The Boeing 787’s lithium-ion batteries are now the subject of intense scrutiny. The Federal Aviation Administration has grounded the entire 787 fleet in the US until it can get to the root cause of a fire hazard involving the batteries.

Federal regulators are pledging a full-scale review of the design and build of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In a news conference, the Federal Aviation Administration said it will get to the root cause of a set of problems, including last week’s fire on a Dreamliner at Boston's Logan Airport.

Associated Press

A Washington family is scheduled to return home Saturday with days to spare before a new Russian law bans American families from adopting Russian children.

Christopher Clow
Carolyn Adolph / KUOW

Correction: This story has been corrected to show that of the 120,000 people who were cut off unemployment benefits before they found a job from summer to 2008 to November 2012, 70 percent have not yet found work.

A program Congress has extended 10 times over the last four years is expected to end this month. The emergency unemployment compensation program has been a safety net for 400,000 people in Washington since the summer of 2008. Four years later 70 percent of people who were cut off from benefits before they found work are still looking. That's about 84,000 people.

blue faucet
blockpartypress / Creative Commons - flickr

Last Tuesday's general election marked a decisive moment for the city of Shoreline: 70 percent of voters there agreed to buy water services back from the city of Seattle and create their own water utility. 

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