Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Carolyn Adolph is the economics reporter at KUOW. She is interested in the forces that affect the fortunes of Seattle-area employers and how those employers are transforming life as we know it.

With this assignment Carolyn's career comes full circle. She began with the Reuters wire, filing business stories to international markets. She graduated to business reporting for major daily newspapers in Toronto and Montreal. She held health and higher education reporting jobs before switching to radio. Her first assigned radio reporting day was September 11, 2001, when the assignment and life changed irretrievably. At the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation she covered Ottawa's major industry: government. She remembers fun work covering English-French issues and needing to own a floor-length gown.

Carolyn joined KUOW in 2008 and built the station's source bank, the Public Insight Network.

Email cadolph@kuow.org

Ways To Connect

The Boeing 787 lands at Seattle's Boeing Field after its maiden flight from Paine Field in Everett.
The Boeing Company

Five years ago this Monday, Boeing's 787 flew for the first time. The Dreamliner, billed as Boeing's game-changing plane, roared into the sky above Everett at 10:27 a.m.

Now another milestone approaches: Boeing says 2015 is the year it makes its first profit per plane on the 787 line.

NTSB's Joseph Kolly, holds an fire-damaged battery casing from the Japan Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner that caught fire at Boston's Logan Airport, at the NTSB laboratory in Washington, D.C., Jan. 24, 2013.
AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

A report from the National Transportation Safety Board says Boeing, its contractors and the Federal Aviation Administration share the blame for a fire in a 787's lithium-ion battery at Boston's Logan Airport two years ago. That fire was one of two incidents that led to the grounding of the Dreamliner fleet in 2013.

The NTSB said the fire on the tarmac at Boston Logan was the result of a short-circuit in a single battery cell. It resulted in smoke, which Boeing said would be a one in 10 million event. But then it spread to other cells, causing a wave of extreme heat known as a thermal runaway and fire.

A study says that iPhone's Siri program -- which can be used without hands or eyes -- is a huge distraction for drivers.
Flickr Photo/Elizabeth Press (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission is taking another run at an expanded distracted driving law. A proposed bill is sitting at the governor’s office now. The legislation would expand the current ban on texting or holding a handset to the ear to include touching a mobile device while driving.

Though the proposal addresses more of the ways people are interacting with their devices, it leaves out one major distraction:  Siri.

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A fourth victim has died of his injuries from the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooting.

Andrew Fryberg, 15, died of a gunshot wound to the head on Friday evening, according to Harborview Medical Center – exactly two weeks after the Oct. 24 shooting.

Frank Rivas, Marysville
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Tuesday is the first day of actual classes for students of Marysville-Pilchuck High School. On Monday, students were bused to the school for a shortened day. It was the first time since the shooting on October 24 that the school community had come together.

KUOW Photo

The Snohomish County medical examiner has still not identified the teen girl who died in Friday's shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School on Friday.

Police have interviewed more than 100 eyewitnesses to the shooting at the school's cafeteria.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Four young people are in intensive care following a shooting in a Marysville high school cafeteria. And two young people are dead.

One, a girl. The other, the alleged shooter. Police have yet to confirm his identity.

KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph reports.

Flickr Photo/Mike Mozart (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Staff at JCPenney in Bellevue are preparing for the store’s closure. In November the store ends its 59-year run in Bellevue Square.

JCPenney, a flagship of the middle class, has been struggling for years. The Texas-based retailer closed 33 under-performing stores across the country earlier this year. Then in September it added Bellevue to the list.

Flickr Photo/ghindo

Rollout of Seattle's $15 minimum wage is still half a year away, and Seattle's auditor says the city is already learning lessons about how to enforce workplace laws.

Courtesy Port of Seattle

After decades of competing for cargo business, the ports of Seattle and Tacoma are forming an unlikely alliance to fight new competitors.

The ports have been struggling with sudden sea changes. Shipping companies are themselves forming alliances and combining cargo into gigantic ships that will be discriminating in their choice of ports.

Flickr Photo/javacolleen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle’s HomeStreet Bank has sold a quarter of its mortgage-servicing business to a bank in Atlanta. It’s a sale that moves $3 billlion worth of mortgage relationships out of state. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph about an unusual problem food banks are facing: too many cans, not enough can openers. The US government is buying five times more canned pink salmon than usual in order keep the price of salmon from falling too low. This helps support the fishing industry and the canned fish is eventually sent to food banks.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is on a salmon-buying binge.  It usually spends $6 million a year buying pink salmon. This summer, it is spending a total $39 million.

After Oso, Reborn From Water And Mud

Sep 21, 2014
Return to Oso
KCTS Photo/Stacey Jenkins

Robin Youngblood cherished the nature around her home in Oso’s Steelhead Haven. When the landslide struck, she and a visiting friend were talking about a deer they had just seen. After the disaster, she left the Oso area. But something called her back. Now she lives a stone’s throw from state Route 530, a few miles east of the slide.

NASA announced the winners of its hotly-contested contract to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station.

Boeing was the big winner.

The company's space unit will be paid more than four billion dollars to deliver and certify its Crew Space Transportation Capsule.

A little over half that will be paid to Boeing's competitor Space X for its own version, called the Dragon.

Mike Fincke is a former International Space Station crew member.

At a news conference Tuesday, Fincke said having two competing capsules will be good for crew safety.

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