Carolyn Adolph | KUOW News and Information

Carolyn Adolph

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2008

Carolyn covers Seattle’s growth and the challenges people have in meeting the regional economy’s shifting demands. She came to KUOW after careers at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Star. She is a graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She studied Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the Cultural Impact of Technological Change at the University of Washington.

Latest Award:  Runner Up, SPJ Investigative Audio Reporting with John Ryan, 2016. 

Email cadolph@kuow.org

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Photo courtesy of the Joyful Heart Foundation/http://www.endthebacklog.org/

People who have been through a sexual assault often find that the first hospital they go to can’t help them. Many hospitals across the country don’t have evidence gathering kits or nurses trained to offer care and support.

That may soon change because of a bipartisan bill just introduced in Congress. 

Screenshot of interaction between motorcyclist, Alex Randall, and King County Sheriff Detective Richard Rowe, August 16, 2017.
Screenshot from YouTube video by Alex Randall

Only a third of complaints about King County Sheriff's deputies in 2016 ever stood a chance of being taken seriously, according to a report released today.

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Amazon’s Marketplace still contains products with racist messages, according to two watchdog groups.


Flickr Photo/craterdweller (CC BY-NC-ND)

Housing prices in metropolitan Seattle are rising by more than $5 an hour, every hour of every day, according to the Puget Sound Regional Council.


A 40-mile long commuter corridor worth of improvements and linking two major highways. This could happen in 5-1/2 years, if the legislature approves.
Image courtesy of WSDOT

Move over, Interstate 5: The section of I-405 from Renton to Bellevue is now the state's most congested highway.

PillPack press photo

Amazon has officially charged into the health sector. 

This week, the e-commerce giant purchased an online pharmacy called PillPack and sent shockwaves rippling through the stock market. Investors immediately stripped billions in value from brick-and-mortar pharmacy stocks.

Flickr Photo/Howard Ignatius (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nZ4Mz1

Washington state’s population grew by 117,000 people this year from last, to 7.4 million people. That’s like gaining a city the size of Everett.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

A first-of-its kind conference gets underway in Seattle this morning, its organizers say. Hundreds of people are getting together to talk about blockchain.


An Uber driver near the San Francisco International Airport.
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

If you want to do business on the public’s streets, it's going to be hard to keep your data private.

That’s the message from Washington’s Supreme Court to Uber and Lyft. In a 5-4 ruling, justices told the companies that "trade secrets" don't prevent rideshare data from being released under the state’s public records law.

The sun sets on downtown Seattle on Friday, October 27, 2017, shown from Harbor Ave. Southwest.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Now that the construction boom that made the city of Seattle rich is starting to decline—and putting newfound pressure on homelessness spending—it’s time to ask where the money went.

After analyzing the city’s budgets over the last eight years, we found some answers.

Downtown Seattle accounts for more than half the city's construction investments, according to DSA.
KUOW Photo File/Megan Farmer

The bloom is off the boom.


Caitlin Lee raises a Tax Amazon sign in front of Seattle City Council members on Monday, May 14, 2018, during a head tax vote at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks about what the compromise head tax means for Seattle with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph. We also talk to Todd Biesold, owner and CFO of Merlino Foods, about how the head tax will affect his business.

Volunteers count the number of people experiencing homelessness during the annual King County Point-In-Time count on Friday, January 25, 2018, in Pioneer Square.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Is Seattle the sort of place where, if you can’t afford it, there’s no room for you?


The sun sets on downtown Seattle on Friday, October 27, 2017, shown from Harbor Ave. Southwest.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

More than a hundred heads of Seattle companies are saying no to Seattle’s head tax proposal. In an open letter to the Seattle City Council, they say it doesn’t make sense to punish businesses for creating jobs.

The letter’s signatories include the heads of Alaska Airlines, Tableau, and Expedia.

Amazon employees walk in front of a map highlighting 238 cities that submitted bids for Amazon's second headquarters in the lobby of the Day 1 building on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It started with a tax proposal related to the cost of fast growth. Now it’s become a showdown.

Amazon said it is halting plans for two downtown Seattle office buildings while it waits for the City Council to decide on a head tax.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

When Highway 99 becomes a tunnel and the Viaduct comes down next year, Seattle starts work on the waterfront of its dreams. There’ll be a bike corridor, a walk-up to Pike Place Market — even a play area for kids.

And one special group of property owners is being singled out to pay. 

The Alaskan Way Viaduct is shown on Friday, March 9, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with reporter Carolyn Adolph about the risks faced by the state of Washington as it considers tolling the Highway 99 Tunnel. 


Cameras on the Highway 520 bridge take pictures of license plates as vehicles pass to assess tolls.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9ftjw3

Drivers will have a free ride on the state Route 99 tunnel in Seattle when it first opens this fall. After a few months, however, expect to pay a toll of $1.00-$2.50 for each trip.

The Washington State Transportation Commission has proposed multiple tolling options and will present them in public meetings this spring. 


An Emergency Evacuation Route sign is shown on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, inside the SR 99 tunnel in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Soon, state Route 99 — and the rest of us —will have a new asset: a completed Alaskan Way tunnel.

The $3.2 billion tunnel provides an earthquake-safe route under our downtown. However, the state highway department says it’s taken the highway off its list of Seismic Lifeline routes


Bill Steele demonstrates of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network uses a shake table to show how earthquake forces gain power as they move away from the ground. But under the ground, it's a different story.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The Seattle region has been growing so fast, there are now 400,000 more people here than in 2009, when we agreed to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct with a tunnel. 

A section of state Route 99 near Evergreen Washelli Funeral Home that does not have sidewalks, but does have pedestrians.
GoogleMaps

This summer the state highway department plans to show Aurora Avenue North some love – in the form of fresh paving.


The northbound lanes of the SR 99 tunnel are shown on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle's SR 99 tunnel will have cellular phone service, sprinklers in case of fire and a pedestrian escape route. 

Gregory Pleasant, 17, center, and Elijah Lewis, 18, right, raise their fists in the air before the start of March For Our Lives Seattle on Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It was a great awakening – thousands of people, many of them teens and preteens, marched through Seattle on Saturday morning. They joined tens of thousands more across the country calling for laws that would curb gun violence.

Reilly Donham, 18, of Mill Creek, Washington, attends the 'March for Our Lives' rally in Seattle on Saturday morning.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We are at the 'March for Our Lives' in Seattle this morning where 50,000 students and their families are expected to rally. We will update this post as the march progresses.

KUOW reporters Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph host 'That's Debatable: Amazon is Good for Seattle' on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We recently hosted a debate to answer a simple question: Is Amazon good for Seattle?

And the answer is: We don’t really know for certain. But the debate did have a clear winner.


KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Amazon's search for a second headquarters has entered a new phase of courtship: The company has begun making visits to the 20 places on its short list.

And the first candidates to confirm they've met with an Amazon team are all in the Washington, D.C., area.

Chaco Canyon Organic Cafe is a University District coffee shop and a source of vegan dishes.
Facebook Photo/Chaco Canyon

Signs of public drug-taking are all over Seattle’s University District.

But an overflowing container of used needles proved too much for one restaurant customer.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Congestion on regional roads is not expected to get better anytime soon, so more and more communities are considering a Puget Sound commuter ferry.

Agencies in Pierce, Thurston and Island counties are all looking into the possibility. But these agencies have a common problem: where to land on Seattle's crowded waterfront.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Last summer Kitsap Transit launched a fast ferry service with a single vessel. The Rich Passage I was the only low-wake boat it had to satisfy shore-erosion concerns along the passage from Bremerton to Seattle.

Since then, the Rich Passage I has missed 128 sailings, mostly because of mechanical failures. And though the vessel has been reliable since last October, Kitsap Transit’s problems aren’t over yet: In just over a month the vessel is due in drydock for the complete replacement of its engines.

An Uber driver near the San Francisco International Airport.
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

Traffic congestion in Seattle is getting worse.

As traffic slows, more people are hailing rides from Uber and Lyft — and that’s adding to the trouble. Now, transit agencies that once fought to regulate car sharing services are thinking it may be time to make a new deal with them.

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