Caroline Chamberlain | KUOW News and Information

Caroline Chamberlain

Podcast Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2015

Caroline Chamberlain is KUOW’s podcast producer. Currently she is the producer of Second Wave, an American story that begins in Vietnam. Previously, she produced segments for KUOW’s midday news show The Record.

Before moving to Seattle, Caroline was the Managing Producer of KCRW’s DnA, a show about design and architecture in Los Angeles and beyond. While at KCRW, she also worked on Good Food, hosted by Evan Kleiman.

Born and raised in Southern California, she received her undergraduate degree at UCLA where she studied history and also worked for The Daily Bruin.

Crosscut writer Knute Berger and KUOW's Kim Malcolm
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Kim Malcolm talks with Crosscut writer Knute Berger about why people in and around Everett might be receptive to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's stances. Trump is holding a rally Tuesday at the Xfinity Arena in Everett at 7 p.m.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Gentrification is not a new story here in Seattle. But is there anything people in Seattle can do to mitigate its effects?

Some aspiring business owners are seeking out the help of Pedro Gomez, who works with Seattle's Office of Economic Development.

Dougsley, the corpse flower at Volunteer Park Conservatory
Courtesy of Terry Huang

Volunteer Park has a fragrant new tenant. 

The University of Washington Biology Department has loaned the Volunteer Park Conservatory a so-called corpse flower that emits an odor reminiscent of a decaying body. 

Courtesy of Washington OSPI / Bobbi Stockwell

After Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson, Missouri two years ago, Nathan Bowling's students came to him for guidance.

Bowling is a teacher at Lincoln High School in Tacoma, where he teaches AP government and politics.

"Mike Brown had just graduated. He's their age. There was just a panic in the room: what if this happens to me? What if this happens to someone we know?" Bowling told KUOW's Bill Radke.

Courtesy of Colin Boyd Shafer

Earlier this month, Seattle became the third city in the country to ban gay conversion therapy. It's an issue that touches Garrard Conley close to home. He grew up in Arkansas, the son of a pastor. 

When he was 18 years old, his parents found out he was gay and gave him an ultimatum: Go to gay conversion therapy, or you are no longer a part of this family. 

Apartment buildings in Seattle
Flickr photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/peTBEw

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle landlord Hugh Brannon about a new ordinance the Seattle City Council passed this week.

The measure aims to reduce housing discrimination through a series of mechanisms, but Brannon explains why he believes certain aspects of this law are counterproductive and take the "human element" out of being a landlord.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Heidi Groover of The Stranger about a new law Seattle City Council passed unanimously Monday targeting housing discrimination.

Flickr Photo/Jun Seita (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ct1wT3

Bill Radke talks with Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful podcast about summer barbecue etiquette.

On the latest episode of The Sporkful, Pashman's listeners submitted questions on the topic, including whether it is problematic to host a bring-your-own-meat barbecue, or if it is ever OK to flip someone else's meat and more. Pashman shared some of his insights on the topic as well as specific rules Seattle barbecuers should be wary of.

Courtesy of MOHAI, Milkie Studio Collection

Bill Radke talks to writer Heather Wells Peterson about the history of revolving restaurants. She wrote an article about it for Lucky Peach. The restaurant on top of the Space Needle, SkyCity Restaurant, is the world's oldest operating revolving restaurant, but they date back all the way to the Roman Empire when the emperor Nero had one. 

Revolving restaurants enjoyed their heyday in the U.S. during the Cold War, but have largely fallen out of fashion since then. But, Peterson explains, they are gaining traction in some Asian countries and in the Middle East.

A Ku Klux Klan rally in Oregon (estimated 1920s)
Courtesy of the Oregon Historical Society

Bill Radke talks with Alana Semuels about an article she wrote for The Atlantic about Portland, Oregon's history of racism. We all know the PDX has a reputation as a liberal, quirky city. Despite this stereotype, Portland today is the whitest city in America, partially as a result of deliberately racist policies in Oregon and Portland itself, some of which date back to the mid 19th century.

Habtamu Abdi, the Seattle Police Department's East African Community Liaison
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Seattle is home to one of the nation's largest East African communities.

An estimated 25,000 East Africans live in King County, according to the 2014 American Community Survey.

It's a community that consists of mostly recent  immigrants and refugees from countries like Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea.

Alissa Wehrman and Eula Scott Bynoe.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

High-profile killings of black men at the hands of police, as well as shootings of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge, prompted Eula Scott Bynoe to organize a public discussion with white people about race.


Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9
Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9

Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Laquan McDonald, Walter Scott. 

"These are all shootings that could've been prevented," said Norm Stamper, former chief of the Seattle Police Department.
 

DoNotPay, the service helping folks get out of parking tickets, is coming soon to Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Mark Lyon (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/99xWhv

Bill Radke speaks to Stanford student Joshua Browder about his service DoNotPay that helps people get parking tickets dismissed with the help from a "lawyerbot."

DoNotPay is available in London and New York City, and it will be coming to Seattle in September. 

Flickr Photo/Agnieszka (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8Ton8p

Miscarriage: you probably know what the word means, and given that one in five pregnancies ends in miscarriage, you likely know someone who’s gone through one.

But for Angela Garbes, it’s a highly problematic term.


Israeli food is more than just challah, especially for one Seattle chef.
Flickr Photo/Rebecca Siegel (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/d9DtUU

Bill Radke speaks with Michael Solomonov, the James Beard Award-winning chef of Zahav, about Israeli cuisine. Solomonov tells Radke about the cuisine's roots, where he's tried it in Seattle and how ingredients and traditions in the Pacific Northwest remind him of Israeli cooking.

Johanna Holden, a San Francisco canvasser.
Courtesy of Raja Shah

So you're walking down the street, and you see one of those people with a clipboard and they try and lure you to help them with their virtuous cause.

What do you do? Do you feel guilty? Annoyed? Do you talk to them, or do you just keep walking?

The mask and costume of the 'Gorn,' a fictionalized species featured on 'Star Trek: The Original Series.'
Courtesy of Brady Harvey/EMP Museum

Fifty years ago, a new television series took us to space to touch on topics that were perhaps too challenging to discuss frankly back on Earth. 

Star Trek: The Original Series premiered in 1966, and since then it's spun off into countless other television series, movies and more. 

Courtesy of Jeff Emtman

Bill Radke speaks with Bethany Denton and Jeff Emtman about their story about the sexually violent predators who reside in the special commitment center on McNeil Island in Washington state.

Courtesy of Kate Murphy

You probably already know this, but lunch these days is sad. This is especially true when it’s eaten during the workday. Frequently, it’s eaten alone, at the desk while answering emails.

There’s research to back lunch’s retreat into sadness.

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