Caroline Chamberlain | KUOW News and Information

Caroline Chamberlain

Podcast Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2015

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Thousands protested in downtown Seattle last night against President Donald Trump's executive orders on immigration and refugees.


immigrant rights protest westlake park
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

The protest was packed before it was scheduled to begin. 

Bodies were crowded in tight at Westlake Park as thousands of people gathered to protest President Trump's executive order on immigration, which had already sparked protests at Sea-Tac International Airport the night before.

Violet and Norward Brooks in front of a house they struggled to buy due to discrimination.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

The results of the recent presidential election has revealed stark divisions in this country.

This is especially clear in Seattle, where we’re notorious for being one of the most progressive cities in the country.


President Barack Obama's farewell address plays on the TV at Cafe Presse.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

As President Obama gave his farewell address Tuesday night, many in Seattle mourned the end of his tenure in the White House.

Among them was Gemma O'Neil, who attended a gathering at Cafe Presse in Seattle last night. As Obama spoke about his wife, Michelle, O’Neil teared up.

Courtesy of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection, MOHAI

Seattle's food scene is booming.

Not only is it doing well economically, but people come from all over the world to try our oysters and berries and stroll Pike Place Market.


Courtesy of Barbara Frailey

The results of the presidential election have stunned people across the country. Trump's win has had a particularly emotional effect on some women and  girls. 

Seattle Girls' School is an all girl middle school in the Central District. And the first day after the presidential election was a time for sharing. Many teachers canceled their regular lesson plans and allowed their students to express their feelings about Trump's victory.

Art teacher Janet Miller said many girls were upset.

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON OSPI / BOBBI STOCKWELL

Bill Radke talks to Lincoln High School teacher Nathan Bowling about the outcome of the presidential election and how his students are reacting. Chief among Bowling's challenges is maintaining civility in the classroom. "I demand it," he said.

Ijeoma Oluo
Courtesy of Ijeoma Oluo

Bill Radke sits down with Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo to discuss the outcome of the presidential election. For many progressives like her, Trump's win was a difficult pill to swallow.

Oluo's intial reaction was to console her family after it became clear Tuesday night that Donald Trump would become the next president of the United States.


A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, N.D.
AP Photo/James MacPherson

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes to talk about the latest in the standoff over the construction of a proposed oil pipeline in North Dakota. 

Seattle's Hooverville, 1939
Courtesy of MOHAI, Seattle P-I Collection.

Bill Radke sits down with Crosscut's Knute Berger to talk about Hoovervilles, the shantytowns that sprang up during the Great Depression, and how they can inform our current debates over homelessness.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke talks with Bill Steele of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network at the University of Washington about how Washington state is unprepared for a large earthquake.

Last June, Washington held the Cascadia Rising earthquake response drill. A report in the wake of the drill found that Washington is unprepared. Steele explains what we should be doing individually and regionally before a major earthquake strikes.

A 2011 sketch by artist William at the Starbucks on Broadway, where Dr. Bob Hughes and Yoshiko Harden were spit on and called racist names.
Flickr Photo/William CC BY-ND 2.0 http://bit.ly/25BBAkw

According to the 2010 census, Seattle is 69 percent white. That means, if you're reading this, you are most likely a white person. But is that how you see yourself in the world? Aren't you just a human being like everyone else?

That line of thinking is deeply rooted in racism, says Robin DiAngelo. She studies whiteness and co-developed the City of Seattle's Race and Social Justice Initiative Anti-Racism training with communities of color. She herself is white.

Courtesy of Alex Czopp

Earlier this month, a tape of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump bragging about groping women sent his campaign into turmoil.

But it's not just Trump on that recording. You can also hear Trump being encouraged by former Today Show host Billy Bush.


Matt Remle drafted the resolution adopted by the Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing negative consequences of the American Indian boarding schools
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Monday is Seattle's third annual celebration of Indigenous People's Day. We asked members of our local indigenous community to share what it means to them. 

Courtesy of OPB/Amanda Peacher

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Ryan Haas about the trial over the occupation of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge earlier this year. 

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