Bond Huberman | KUOW News and Information

Bond Huberman

Social Media Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2013

Social media producer Bond Huberman designs and deploys all strategy for KUOW social media. What does that mean? It means she writes a lot of tweets. And quickly.

When she isn't immersed in Tweetdeck, responding to your Facebook comments or producing crucial pledge drive GIFs, Bond is contributing in a variety of ways to different projects around the station: she helps curate questions for our Local Wonder series, writes story headlines for maximum possible engagement, and she even voices listener comments for our daily show The Record. More recently, she is the web lead for our reporting team that covers immigration. She's also a consultant in our Audio Shop.

Before she came to KUOW, Bond was online editor at Seatttle magazine and online managing editor for City Arts magazine. She is a graduate of University of Washington's MFA Creative Writing program.

Before that she lived in Texas. But we'll save that for another time.

Jesse Taga took this photo on the way to the water taxi on Vashon Island.
Courtesy Jesse Taga via Facebook

There is almost nothing so special as a snowy day in Seattle. They are rare, about once every other year, and when they hit, the city shuts down. 

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

It ended almost as dramatically as it began.

After working “literally around the clock” all week, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson and his team went to court against President Donald Trump Friday – and they won, securing a temporary halt to the President’s immigration ban.

Washington refugees world map
KUOW/Kara McDermott

Nearly 25,000 immigrants and refugees in Washington state could be directly affected by an order signed last week (picture SafeCo Field almost half-full). Let’s break those numbers down. 

Leslie Brown, an activist with Edmonds Neighborhood Action Coalition, shouted into a bullhorn to rally dozens of protesters gathered outside the Edmonds PCC, January 29, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Before crowds packed a protest in Seattle, another protest was already underway.

Dozens of residents crowded onto the four corners of Edmonds Way and 100th Ave W, a busy intersection where locals go for groceries and commuters zoom past to catch the ferry.

They chanted, "No hate! No fear! Refugees are welcome here!" and cheered as cars blared their horns.

Here's what a few attendees told us:

Immigration growth
KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

“We’re going to build a wall,” President Donald Trump said at his first White House press conference. Given the controversial talking point from his campaign is now a national promise, here are a few things worth knowing:

KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

They spent the first hours of Donald Trump's presidency waiting.

First they were in the cold, snaked outside McCaw Hall. A little boy  seemed desperate to splash in a nearby water feature.  Then they waited inside—for hours—as volunteers distributed snacks, waiting themselves for instructions.

The crowd warms up before a live broadcast Friday of KUOW's Week in Review at the Leif Erikson Lodge in Ballard.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

There was plenty to talk about in 2015, and talk we did on Week In Review.

We talked local and international news, from Charlie Hebdo attacks to Bertha's big stall. We laughed about the gum wall. We debated the Seattle teachers strike, Donald Trump, and praying on football fields. We mourned losses faraway in Paris and nearby on the Aurora bridge.

The International Sweethearts of Rhythm at the Black & Tan Speakeasy, Sept. 24, 1944. Photo by Al Smith Sr.
Courtesy of The National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center

1. Who some of these people are in these amazing archival photos of African-American life in Seattle.

2. There are worms in the blackberries you pick every summer. 

3. If you launch rockets made of water bottles, as students at the Northwest Indian College did, NASA might call you up.

Taken at the second Storywallahs event; the theme was Coming Home.
KUOW Photos/Bond Huberman

The 24-year-old man didn’t have a home.

So he came up with a bold plan: Go to the nicest neighborhood in Grand Rapids, Michigan, knock on the doors of 10 mansions and ask if he could move in.

The super blood moon over Seattle on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015.
Flickr Photo/David Lee (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1FwX1qZ

The Northwest was was treated with a spectacular sky show Sunday night as a lunar eclipse coincided with a supermoon -- a full moon when it's at its closest to Earth on its orbit. Clear autumn skies allowed for prime viewing.

The phenomenon hasn't happened in 33 years, and we'll have to wait another 18 to see it again in 2033 (we however do not yet have a forecast on what the weather will be like that day).

food bank volunteer
U.S. Department of Agriculture

To complement our series Seattle’s Homeless: No End In Sight, we asked organizations who work with homeless people around King County to participate in an online survey. 

We wanted to know – direct from the people who do this work every day – what is most challenging about providing services for the homeless right now? And what, perhaps, do outsiders misunderstand about the work?

A selection of responses we received are published below; some have been edited for brevity.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

Affordable housing means spending 30 percent or less of household income on housing, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.