Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/ sharkhats (CC BY-NC 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/qFaSB8

Bill Radke talks to aerospace and science editor for Geekwire, Alan Boyle, about some mysterious bursts of radio waves coming from three billion light-years away and what he explains what you should do if you find see bits of a space lab falling from the sky

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Washington state Sen. Schoesler (R-Ritzville), about issues that will arise in the state legislature in the 2018 session. 

Deputy Chief Carmen Best, left, and Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole listen as Mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to The Seattle Times criminal justice reporter Steve Miletich about U.S. District Judge James Robart's ruling that found the Seattle Police Department was in full and effective compliance with the court ordered reforms. 

Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Hayat Norimine, associate editor for Seattle Met's PubliCola, about a bill in the state legislature that would remove the statute of limitation on felony sex offenses. Right now victims in our state only have three years to pursue charges after a crime happens, or ten years if they reported the crime to the police in the first year after the crime was committed. This is one of the shortest statute of limitations for rape in the country. 

Shaun Scott (nametag misspelled)  and Hanna Brooks Olsen, holding the coffees they chose to buy instead of putting down payments on a home. Michael Hobbes has a policy of keeping his face off of the internet. Overhead sparkles are complete happenstance.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

If you believe the New York Times, or watch CNN, or have read a thinkpiece between now and 2007 — you already know the bad news: The world is ending. Millennials, the generation born between 1982 and 2000, have arrived to ruin #allthethings, blanketing the landscape with a thick carpet of Snapchat filters, participation trophies, and avocado toast. What does this, the most entitled cohort to ever walk the earth, expect from life? It might not be what you think.

Department of Natural Resources estimates that the landslide volume is approximately 4 million cubic yards and covers an area of about 20 acres.
Washington State Department of Natural Resources

Bill Radke talks to David Montgomery, professor of geology at the University of Washington, about the crack in Rattlesnake Ridge and what geologist and state officials are looking for as they monitor the slow moving slide.  

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Peter Goodman, the European economics correspondent for The New York Times, about why workers in Sweden are not worried about robots replacing their jobs. And we hear from Carolyn Adolph and Joshua McNichols about how robots are changing the way humans work at Amazon and what the economic future of our country might be as more jobs are replaced by artificial intelligence and automation.

David Sedaris, signing one of more than 8,000 tip-ins. This is the hard labor that goes into your signed author copy.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer


David Sedaris was angry.

He was angry because he had to sign his name on 8,000 blank sheets of paper. He was angry because he already signs his name at readings all over the world — and now his publisher was making him sign his name on thousands of “tip-ins” to be bound into copies of his latest book. 

Photo courtesy of Mitchell Frimodt

Bill Radke talks to Mitchell Frimodt, University of Washington junior and director of the UWashington Hyperloop team about the Hyperloop pod the team has built to compete in SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition in California. Since 2015 SpaceX has held a global competition with the hopes of speeding up the development of the hyperspeed train-like transportation system. 

But before you get excited at the idea of traveling at hyperspeed, Mark Hallenbeck, the director of the Washington State Transportation Center at the University of Washington explains why Hyperloop probably isn't coming to the Northwest anytime soon. 

Lauri Hennessey was one of many anonymous women who accused Oregon Senator Bob Packwood of improper conduct in the 1990s.
Courtesy Lauri Hennessey

A powerful senator and public champion of women is accused of sexual harassment. As the number of accusers mounts, his fellow senators urge him to step down. Eventually the pressure is too great, and he resigns. 

We're not talking about Al Franken. We're talking about former Oregon senator Bob Packwood.

Former Mayor Ed Murray at a press conference in the University District in September 2016.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times reporter Lewis Kamb about how the city of Seattle came to settle the lawsuit filed against former mayor Ed Murray and why it will pay $150,000 to the man accusing Murray of raping and molesting him as a teenager. 

high five colors
Flickr Photo/brian.abeling (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rcMMhx

'Tis the season to think about New Year's resolutions. But we're less interested in the one you made on Monday than the ones that you made for 2017. Did you fail? Or do you have a success story? Jeannie Yandel and Bill Radke shared their own resolutions and heard from callers. 

A North Korean soldier looks at the southern side through a pair of binoculars at the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003.
AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Bill Radke talks to Elizabeth Saunders, an associate professor of political science at George Washington University, about the exchanges between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, diplomacy and the threat of nuclear war

The view from Husky Stadium.
Flickr Photo/Ray Terrill (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/aCwsMx

Bob Rondeau, the voice of the Huskies, is retiring Saturday after 37 years in the press box. Bill Radke caught up with him in Arizona, where he’ll be calling the Fiesta Bowl before retiring. He asked Rondeau about an especially memorable call – which has stuck with him for all the wrong reasons.

A toll area on Interstate 405.
Flickr Photo/SounderBruce (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ruiWYC

Bill Radke talks to Ed Barry, the Toll Division Director with the Washington State Department of Transportation, about a new report (PDF) that recommends raising the price of the top toll on Interstate 405 past $10.

It was one of a series of recommendations to keep traffic flowing on the busy corridor.  WSDOT has also conducted a study analyzing the effectiveness of I-405 tolling as the population in the region continues to grow. 

The Seattle skyline, seen across the water.
Flickr Photo/Shelly Provost (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/VEhbc2

Essayist Elissa Washuta spent last summer in the Fremont Bridge. The old control room was turned into an office, which allowed her to sit over the water and write. Elissa is descended from the Cowlitz and Cascade people. The longer she looked at the shipping canal, the less she could separate it from the displacement of the Duwamish people in service of progress and growth.

Seattle is in a new wave of growth, with similar implications for those who were here before, including the Coast Salish peoples. On a visit back to Seattle from Columbus, Ohio, Elissa joined Bill Radke for a conversation on the flow of water – and people – in and out of this city.

Adra Boo and Jen Petersen talk about leaving and staying in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Jen Petersen and Adra Boo about their respective decisions to leave Seattle (and the United States) and stay in the Puget Sound region. They reflect on what's changed and what hasn't and whether Seattle is living up to its progressive ideals. 

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, center, looks at election returns with staff during an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala.
AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Harvey Weinstein, Louis C.K., Charlie Rose, and others were swiftly fired after allegations against them broke. But Roy Moore came within 1.5 percent of being elected to the U.S. Senate. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is still on the bench. And Donald Trump is still in the White House, as was Bill Clinton following his own transgressions.

When it comes to claims of sexual misconduct, why are media figures being held to a higher standard than public officials?

Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Laura Kipnis, author of the book "Unwanted Advances," and Ijeoma Oluo, Seattle writer and editor at large of the Establishment, about  power, behavior and how you change the culture around sexual harassment. 

Early improvisational greats Elaine May and Mike Nichols.
Wikimedia

According to author Sam Wasson, it is. He sat down with Bill Radke to talk about his new book, "Improv Nation." The book explores what Wasson calls a great American art. Improv was founded by a social worker named Viola Spolin, who used it to help connect immigrant kids who didn’t share a language or culture. From there it gave us Nichols and May, Second City, and the early careers of many comic luminaries.

Cranberries make up a huge part of Pacific County's economy. The industry's workforce is being disrupted by immigration arrests and deportations.
Flickr Photo/Holly Ladd (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/5ypHND

Last month, Seattle Times reporter Nina Shapiro wrote a story about how immigrant neighbors were disappearing from Long Beach, a town in southwest Washington’s Pacific County. People were being detained and deported by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, often without ICE notifying law enforcement in the town.

A week after her story came out, Shapiro got a call saying an immigrant source she'd quoted anonymously had been arrested by immigration agents. When they picked him up, they said, “You’re the one from the newspaper.” Nina joined Bill Radke for a conversation about the hazards of immigration reporting in the age of Donald Trump.

Some of the microaggressions noted by KUOW listeners.
KUOW Illustration

On the night of Dr. Roberto Montenegro’s dissertation defense celebration, he went out to dinner at a fancy restaurant with his wife and colleagues. He felt like he was on top of the world at the end of the night.

Until, as he stood in line waiting to claim his car from the valet stand, a woman walked up and handed him her keys. She assumed that because he was Latino, he was there to park her car.

Reporter, broadcaster, and author Dan Rather in the KUOW studios on December 8, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer


Dan Rather knows exactly what question he’d ask President Donald Trump in an interview: What are you so afraid of?

Rather told Bill Radke he’d start this way: “Mr. President, of what are you afraid? You have indicated by word and deed that you are very afraid of something."

present gift wrapped
Flickr Photo/Plastic_Bat (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7m9UP1

This holiday season, let's all try to avoid being like Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout.

Remember her? The famed profligate from the Shel Silverstein poem who refused to take the garbage out? Let us refresh your memory.

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole, left, and Deputy Chief Carmen Best listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to state Representative Morgan Irwin and Michele Storms, Deputy Director of the ACLU of Washington about what they hope to see in the next Seattle police chief. 

ballot drop box ballot box
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The election results were just certified -- and voter turnout was a historically low 37.1%. That shatters the previous low... of 38.5%, in the 2015 election. We went to vote by mail in 2011 to increase turnout. What gives? To find out, Bill Radke spoke with Christopher Mann, associate political science professor at Skidmore. Tl;dr? As its voting rate declines, Washington has lots of company across established democracies. Mann also mentions local media as one potential way to stop the slide.

Kristin Leong, creator of the Roll Call Project and Christina Joo, junior at International School in Bellevue
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks with Kristin Leong and Christina Joo about finding common ground between students and teachers.

Leong is a former middle school teacher and founder of the Roll Call Project, which asks students and teachers to think about what they have in common, and why it matters. Joo is a junior at International School in Bellevue, and a participant in the project.

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole, left, and Deputy Chief Carmen Best listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Kirsten Harris-Talley, former Seattle City Councilmember about what she hopes to see in the next police chief of the Seattle Police Department. 

Are you sure you're handing your keys to the valet?
Flickr Photo/Caitlin Regan (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/6AB68e

On the night of Dr. Roberto Montenegro’s dissertation defense celebration, he was at a fancy restaurant and feeling on top of the world — until a woman bypassed the valet stand and handed him her keys.

Bill Radke talks to the New York Times' Gender Editor Jessica Bennett about the fact that so many of the high-profile men who have been accused of workplace sexual harassment and assault also decided what stories we all had access to, from movies and TV to news coverage. Bennett has been writing about this in her newsletter for the NYT, The #MeTooMoment.  

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