Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/Tom Coates (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The best barista in America gets crowned this week in Seattle at a meeting of the Specialty Coffee Association of America taking place at the Convention Center.

Baristas from across America will be timed and judged as they make espressos and cappuccinos while talking about the coffee they're serving.

Flickr Photo/Calamity Meg (CC-BY-NC-ND)

To celebrate William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, Christopher Gaze takes a moment to remind you how the great playwright lives in the way you talk. Gaze is the artistic director of the annual Bard on the Beach festival in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Flickr Photo/Ingrid Taylar (CC BY-NC)

David Fenton has a piece of advice on celebrating Earth Day this Tuesday: If you really want to help, stop calling it Earth Day.

He said the day is not about the earth. “The planet is going to be fine. It just will eject us, and unfortunately a lot of other species,” Fenton said. “The planet will recover. We just won’t be here. That’s what we need to explain to people.”

King County Metro bus
Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC BY-NC-ND)

Even before the Washington State Legislature failed to pass a transportation funding package this session, King County Executive Dow Constantine announced the county would not wait for the state.

Constantine said King County would go it alone and ask its voters to pay more money for King County Metro Transit and for road projects.

YouTube

Have you ever watched a slick ad for a corporation and found yourself taken in by the touching pictures and sincere voiceover?

The web site McSweeney's Internet Tendency has a parody of generic ad copy as a satire of corporate advertising.

Between jokes about corporate jargon and loose references to being earth-friendly, the ad takes a jab at smiley, stock footage people:

Archie McPhee

Seattle-based company Archie McPhee is getting national attention for putting a horse head on a squirrel.

To clarify, the company is selling a squirrel feeder shaped like a hollow horse head. You put the food up inside it and wait for a curious squirrel to stick its head in with hilarious consequences.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, Pool

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Patrol chaplain Mike Neil about his experiences helping people with the emotional toll of the Oso mudslide.

Neil is there to serve the search crews in the debris field, many of whom are the family and friends of victims. “Put yourself in that position of actually finding that person – that is a very traumatic thing and I’m not sure that they’re really prepared for what they might find,” Neil said.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

As of Wednesday morning, the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s office has confirmed that 29 people have died in the Oso landslide. Hopes of finding survivors are dwindling.

That’s taking a toll on the families and the search crews, some who have been out there since the very beginning, doing intense physical and emotional work. Rescue operations managers are very conscious about giving those crews a break, letting them rotate in and out so they can rest and recharge.

Bill Radke talks with photojournalist Joshua Trujillo about his experience covering the Oso mudslide through photography.

Flickr Photo/Doc Searls (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Los Angeles Fire Captain Ronald Klamecki about his own work in a landslide recovery in California and how authorities will decide regarding their next steps.

"As days go by, the potential of finding live victims diminishes. The rescuers are really putting forth the great effort and it wears on them too," he said. "They're doing their very best to bring closure to the victims' families."

Flickr Photo/Beth Jusino (CC-BY-NC)

I begin and end my days with technology.

My iPhone alarm goes off, I check the news and email, I stream the radio, I surf the web by day, and I fall asleep to the sound of my white noise app.

Are people like me just modern, or are we app-dependent?

Flickr Photo/Rajesh_India (CC BY-NC-ND)

Once upon a time there was a king who thought himself a god. The king’s son did not treat his father like a god. This made the king angry. The angry king persuaded his sister to kill the boy with her fireproof cloak. She put the boy on her lap and sat on a bonfire.

But as the flames roared, the cloak flew off her and covered him. And the king’s sister died, and the boy was saved. And the king who fancied himself a god was killed by a real god.

Courtesy of KOMO News

Bill Radke talks with TV producer Doug Tolmie about his friend and colleague Bill Strothman. Strothman and pilot Gary Pfitzner were killed in Tuesday's helicopter crash at Seattle Center.

"Everybody who met [Bill], even in a brief situation, were touched by his professionalism and his kindness," he said. "This was one heck of a gentle man."

Flickr Photo/Allan Henderson (CC By 2.0)

This week when I’ve asked my kids about their school day, their answers have been all about worms. Their recess playgrounds have been lively with earthworms surfacing, as they typically do during a rainy week like we had. When I was a kid, they told us worms surfaced so they wouldn't drown.

Flickr Photo/TofflerAnn (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with alpine skiers Mark Bathum of Mercer Island and Cade Yamamoto of Quincy about their sport. The 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, kick off March 7.

Steve McQueen's film "12 Years a Slave" is nominated for nine Academy Awards.

The 86th annual Academy Awards is this Sunday, and one of the films expected to take home the Oscar is Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave.”

Screenshot from Animal Planet video.

If you’re walking outside this weekend in Woodinville, Wash., that’s not just birdsong coming from the trees.

Bear Creek Studio was featured on an episode of Animal Planet’s show Treehouse Masters. The crew from the reality show built a recording space for the music studio 18 feet up in the cedar trees.

The episode airs Friday at 10 p.m. and has brought in a couple of musical guests. CeeLo Green drops in to play and is joined by the treehouse’s Fall City designer Pete Nelson, who takes a turn at the microphone – for better or worse.

Flickr Photo/Fulvio Minichini

While the legalization of marijuana could be viewed as a liberal cause, the counterculture’s favorite herb isn’t exactly eco-friendly.

“Indoor pot farms are energy guzzlers,” said Seattle news analyst Joni Balter.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

We’ve been talking this week about the appeal of being a fair-weather sports fan and joining a community that’s rooting for the same thing. In Seattle at the moment, that’s obviously the Seahawks. On Sunday, they play the San Francisco 49ers.

Washington state legislators have said for a couple of years now that passing a transportation package is among their top priorities. But Joni Balter, a longtime Seattle news analyst, told KUOW’s Bill Radke that won’t likely happen this year.

The sign at Pike Place Market.
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Cohen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The East Coast is getting hammered by a “polar vortex” of low pressure that has moved south from the North Pole.

Fecal transplant: It may sound gross, but in Dr. David Suskind's view, it offers hope for one of the biggest public health challenges in the world.

Flickr Photo/Ted Leung

What happens when you become a star and then you’re not anymore? Where do you go after that?

Seattle guitarist Dave Dederer was a member of The Presidents of the United States of America. In the '90s they had three top-40 hits, two Grammy nominations and a platinum album.

Dederer’s star has faded but his career hasn’t. Now he’s at Amazon as the head of music programming. Bill Radke asked Dederer what made him switch careers.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

The University of Washington introduced Chris Petersen as the new head of Husky football yesterday.

Petersen compiled a record at Boise State of 92-12 over eight seasons. At Monday's press conference, Petersen said whenever he came to Montlake to face the Huskies, he felt envious.

That's Not What The Fox Says. It Goes Wow-Wow

Oct 23, 2013
Flickr Photo/US National Archives

"What does the fox say?" — the viral video in which a child’s barnyard sounds book goes “Gangnam Style” — has spurred many parodies,  including one from longtime local drive time show, Bob Rivers on KJR. Their Twisted Tunes team spun the tune into a pep rally ditty for the Seattle Seahawks.

This inspired KUOW host Bill Radke to ponder — and answer — the cosmic question himself. Play the audio clip to find out exactly what a fox says.

If you’re pondering what to do this weekend consider the shining reviews coming in for the movie "Gravity" with Sandra Bullock and George Clooney. Here’s Seattle film writer David Chen with his take on "Gravity."

AP Photo/J Pat Carter

A Seattle open-water swimmer is questioning whether Diana Nyad really swam to Florida on her own.

Math For Love

You’ve heard that America must train its children for careers in the STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and math. But math is not just a stable, sensible career.

Seattle educator Dan Finkel says math is a joy. If it’s a drag, why would you inflict it on your child?

Finkel and his wife, Katherine Cook, run an education program called Math For Love. Long before he got his PhD in math from the University of Washington, he was a kid, wondering why he was learning math in school.


Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Announces Retirement

Aug 23, 2013
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

One year: That’s how long that Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has before he retires as the head of the company. In a news release today, Microsoft announced that the chief executive officer will stay until the company has chosen his successor.

AP Photo/Peter Millett

Staff Sgt Robert Bales, who pleaded guilty in June to the murder of 16 Afghan civilians, is being tried before a military jury of six who will decide whether he should be eligible for parole. Nine Afghan villagers who survived the massacre have flown to Joint Base Lewis-McChord for the sentencing trial.

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