Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/prensa4 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Now that Washington's first retail marijuana stores have opened to the public, officials face a major effort to educate consumers about how to use pot responsibly. Bill Radke talks with marijuana researcher Roger Roffman about some of the misconceptions and risks associated with cannabis use.

Roffman points out high-risk scenarios before picking up a pot habit in any form:

Nick-Hanauer.com

Bill Radke talks to Seattle multi-millionaire investor Nick Hanauer (that's right, he's not a billionaire, just has "hundreds of millions") about a warning to his fellow "plutocrats" and why he thinks economic policies aimed at saving the middle class will save rich people everywhere.

Sorry
Flickr Photo/Stefan Bucher (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Sorry about your loss.

This week City Light’s leader lost $60,000, Facebook lost credibility and the U.S. men's team lost at the World Cup, as always. But KUOW's Bill Radke welcomes a winning panel: Knute Berger, Joni Balter, C.R. Douglas, Luke Burbank and special guest, Monica Guzman.

(Bonus: Name that new Seattle water taxi!)

Flickr Photot/Sounder Bruce (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle City Light hired an online reputation management firm and now the utility would like its money, and its repuation, back. The State Liquor Control board filed emergency marijuana rules. And why does Seattle love soccer, a sport where losing can end happily?

KUOW's Bill Radke kicks those stories and more around with Joni Balter, Knute Berger and Eli Sanders.

Flickr Photo/Nathan Forget (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Clint Dempsey and the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team need only a tie against Germany to advance to the second round of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Bill Radke asks BBC soccer analyst Steve Crossman what we need to know to enjoy the match.

new report funded by former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg says climate change is bad for business, with up to $100 billion in coastal real estate underwater by 2050. 

The report projects Seattle's sea level to rise as much as three feet by the end of this century. That’s not because nearby Alaskan glaciers are melting, however. Taken by themselves, those melting Alaskan glaciers could actually cause sea level to drop in the short term.

KUOW's Bill Radke talks with Climate Central scientist Ben Strauss about how that works.

Flickr Photo/Mike Arieta (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The "Frozen" shark has been jumped.

How many months have we been saying, “enough of that song from Disney's 'Frozen!'” The song “Let It Go” has been inescapable on the web, television and the radio. But it's not so bad — it’s not like Pearl Jam is doing it.

That is, until Friday night in Milan, Italy, when Eddie Vedder and the boys were in the middle of playing their song, “Daughter.”

I guess it reminded Eddie of his own daughters, that he's gotten older and so have you.

Flickr Photo/Keith Allison (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle’s school superintendent might go to Sacramento. Rideshare companies can deploy all the drivers they want. The Seattle Times takes a new angle on sports coverage as the Washington Redskins patent is dissolved. Seattle City Light planted puff pieces about itself online. No surprise, Seattle traffic is bad.

And the official Seattle song you’ve never heard.

KUOW's Bill Radke recaps those stories and more news of the week with Civic Cocktail’s Joni Balter, C.R. Douglas of Q13 FOX News, and LiveWire's Luke Burbank.

Flickr Photo/Werwin15 (CC BY 2.0)

Bill Radke talks with news analyst Joni Balter about how Washington and Colorado officials are packaging marijuana edibles to keep people out of the emergency room.

Flickr Photo/Nic Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Bill Radke talks with New York Times tech writer David Streitfeld about the ongoing tussle between Amazon and a handful of its suppliers. The company is blocking preorders and slowing shipments of some items as it negotiates.

Seattle Symphony YouTube Video

Critics are squabbling over Seattle Symphony's latest program: teaming up with Sir Mix-A-Lot and some dancing women at Benaroya Hall in a performance of "Baby Got Back."

You don't associate orchestral music with liking big butts and not lying, but the video of the performance is a hit — more than two million views on YouTube so far. (Scroll down to watch the video.)

Flowers at a memorial for the 2014 Seattle Pacific University shooting.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks with Seattle Pacific University President Daniel Martin about Thursday's shooting on SPU's campus.

Flickr Photo/Robbie Veldwijk

Cats have four legs. Dogs have four legs. So obviously, all animals have four legs.

Flickr Photo/jseattle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke interviews Seattle City Councilmember Jean Godden about the 'ramps to nowhere' on State Route 520 near the Washington Arboretum. They were built 40 years ago, intended for a highway from Duwamish to Bothell that never materialized. As the new SR 520 is being built, the question of what to do with the ramps has resurfaced.

Northwest News Network/Taylor Winkel

Bill Radke talks with University of Colorado-Boulder law professor Charles Wilkinson, author of "Messages From Frank's Landing," about his friend and colleague, Billy Frank, Jr.

Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about a plan to close the so-called "gun show loophole" by requiring a background check for any gun sold on city property.

Flickr Photo/David Jones (CC BY-NC-ND)

On Tuesday, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver ordered that Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling be banned from the team and the NBA for life. The announcement came after Sterling's racist remarks were made public in a secretly taped recording.

Bill Radke talks with Northwest News Network reporter Jessica Robinson about a possible deal to free Idaho soldier Bowe Bergdahl. Army Sergeant Bergdahl has been held captive in Afghanistan by the Taliban since 2009.

Flickr Photo/Tom Coates (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The best barista in America gets crowned this week in Seattle at a meeting of the Specialty Coffee Association of America taking place at the Convention Center.

Baristas from across America will be timed and judged as they make espressos and cappuccinos while talking about the coffee they're serving.

Flickr Photo/Calamity Meg (CC-BY-NC-ND)

To celebrate William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, Christopher Gaze takes a moment to remind you how the great playwright lives in the way you talk. Gaze is the artistic director of the annual Bard on the Beach festival in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Flickr Photo/Ingrid Taylar (CC BY-NC)

David Fenton has a piece of advice on celebrating Earth Day this Tuesday: If you really want to help, stop calling it Earth Day.

He said the day is not about the earth. “The planet is going to be fine. It just will eject us, and unfortunately a lot of other species,” Fenton said. “The planet will recover. We just won’t be here. That’s what we need to explain to people.”

King County Metro bus
Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC BY-NC-ND)

Even before the Washington State Legislature failed to pass a transportation funding package this session, King County Executive Dow Constantine announced the county would not wait for the state.

Constantine said King County would go it alone and ask its voters to pay more money for King County Metro Transit and for road projects.

YouTube

Have you ever watched a slick ad for a corporation and found yourself taken in by the touching pictures and sincere voiceover?

The web site McSweeney's Internet Tendency has a parody of generic ad copy as a satire of corporate advertising.

Between jokes about corporate jargon and loose references to being earth-friendly, the ad takes a jab at smiley, stock footage people:

Archie McPhee

Seattle-based company Archie McPhee is getting national attention for putting a horse head on a squirrel.

To clarify, the company is selling a squirrel feeder shaped like a hollow horse head. You put the food up inside it and wait for a curious squirrel to stick its head in with hilarious consequences.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, Pool

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Patrol chaplain Mike Neil about his experiences helping people with the emotional toll of the Oso mudslide.

Neil is there to serve the search crews in the debris field, many of whom are the family and friends of victims. “Put yourself in that position of actually finding that person – that is a very traumatic thing and I’m not sure that they’re really prepared for what they might find,” Neil said.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

As of Wednesday morning, the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s office has confirmed that 29 people have died in the Oso landslide. Hopes of finding survivors are dwindling.

That’s taking a toll on the families and the search crews, some who have been out there since the very beginning, doing intense physical and emotional work. Rescue operations managers are very conscious about giving those crews a break, letting them rotate in and out so they can rest and recharge.

Bill Radke talks with photojournalist Joshua Trujillo about his experience covering the Oso mudslide through photography.

Flickr Photo/Doc Searls (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Los Angeles Fire Captain Ronald Klamecki about his own work in a landslide recovery in California and how authorities will decide regarding their next steps.

"As days go by, the potential of finding live victims diminishes. The rescuers are really putting forth the great effort and it wears on them too," he said. "They're doing their very best to bring closure to the victims' families."

Flickr Photo/Beth Jusino (CC-BY-NC)

I begin and end my days with technology.

My iPhone alarm goes off, I check the news and email, I stream the radio, I surf the web by day, and I fall asleep to the sound of my white noise app.

Are people like me just modern, or are we app-dependent?

Flickr Photo/Rajesh_India (CC BY-NC-ND)

Once upon a time there was a king who thought himself a god. The king’s son did not treat his father like a god. This made the king angry. The angry king persuaded his sister to kill the boy with her fireproof cloak. She put the boy on her lap and sat on a bonfire.

But as the flames roared, the cloak flew off her and covered him. And the king’s sister died, and the boy was saved. And the king who fancied himself a god was killed by a real god.

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