Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke


Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Flickr Photo/Franco Bouly (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke talks to Anna Lauren Hoffmann, associate professor at the University of Washington's Information School, about the implications of Facebook's idea to stop revenge porn and nude pictures from circulating on their site. 

A little girl looks over her father's shoulder at a smartphone.
Flickr Photo/Lynn Friedman (CC BY 2.0)/

How do old parenting dilemmas adapt to new technologies? Parents: when you’re raising kids in the technological age, how much wiggle room with screen time do you give them? How has your own tech use changed in response to what you want them to be doing? And … is it really tech time if everyone is playing with a sensor-enabled ball, but you’re all outside?


Haven't voted yet? Your ballot is due on Tuesday. We'll catch you up on the latest election news with help from Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KING 5 political reporter Natalie Brand and Q13 political analyst C.R. Douglas.

Jessyn Farrell was a state legislator representing northeast Seattle. She was also a candidate for Seattle mayor.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer


Jessyn Farrell wants to see a profound culture shift in Olympia.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Do you ever come across an item — bottle caps, Styrofoam — you’re not sure you can recycle? Or did you read the story about China no longer accepting our recyclables and panic?

From left, James Marx, Carrie Howell, Robin Mueller and Haley Ballast write letters of support after a flier from the group Respect Washington circulated Burien, on Monday, October 30, 2017, in Burien.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to KUOW's immigration reporter Liz Jones about a letter that was mailed to some residents in Burien that listed the names and addresses of people who were accused of committing crimes and believed to be undocumented residents. 

Lindy West: 'I'm reclaiming the term witch hunt'

Oct 30, 2017
Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez /

Lindy West knows what she wants men to do next. And it doesn’t involve making shameful public confessions or warning about possible “witch hunts” against powerful men.

KUOW PHOTO/ Kara McDermott

Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien is one of the lawmakers proposing to study the idea of tolling -- not just 520 or Highway 99, but Seattle surface streets, too. The new waterfront tunnel is going to have a toll. That toll will cause some drivers to spill onto our already-crowded surface streets and congestion pricing could help with that, but is it the only way to ease downtown traffic?

Lines of code
Flickr Photo/markus spiske (CC BY 2.0)/

Thinking of making a career switch? Maybe you should consider coding.

No, really — it’s not as hard as you probably think. That’s according to Cheri Allen, a software engineer and educator at the University of Washington and Unloop.

A box containing an order from is shown after it was delivered to a house in Etters, Pa, Wednesday, Sept 16, 2005.
AP Photo/John Zeedick

Bill Radke talks with Washington Post opinion columnist Christine Emba about Amazon Key, a new delivery service from Amazon that drops off packages inside customer's homes.

Emba's latest column in titled "Amazon Key is Silicon Valley at its most out of touch."

File photo of homeless ecampment under bridge.
KUOW Photo

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a proposed head tax that would require high earning businesses in Seattle to pay $100 per employee. The funds raised would go towards programs that help people experiencing homelessness.  

A screenshot of the Seattle Poetic Grid.

Seattle is a city that’s been shaped by technology, from Boeing to Microsoft to Amazon. But there’s a new digital presence influencing how we see the city: poetry. The Seattle Poetic Grid is the culminating project of Claudia Castro Luna, in her role as the inaugural Seattle Civic poet. In conversation with The Record’s Bill Radke, she says it makes perfect sense for a poetic atlas to live in the world of ones and zeros.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Mark Hallenbeck about a pay-by-mile approach to funding roads and bridges in Washington. The state is rolling out a pilot program in January where drivers would pay taxes on the miles they drive, instead of the gas they purchase.

Photo courtesy of YouTube

The ad against state Senate candidate Manka Dhingra might be funny if it wasn’t so telling.

“Hey, Eastside. It’s Seattle. We don’t have enough liberal politicians,” says a young woman wearing a “raise taxes” button.

“Do Seattle a solid. Send Manka Dhingra to the Senate,” says a bearded man wearing plaid.

“Manka Dhingra will give us free stuff. I love free stuff,” says a gray-haired woman dressed like a hippie.

Journalist David Neiwert
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

In the late 1970’s, David Neiwert was just getting his journalism career started. He worked at a small daily newspaper in Sand Point, Idaho, about 20 miles outside the Aryan Nations compound.

He had to figure out how the paper was going to cover the hate group.


This week, some Seattle-area leaders told Amazon they'd like to hit the refresh button on their relationship with the company. Is Seattle going overboard with the apologizing? And what does Amazon owe Seattle for its success?

Amazon confirmed a second and 'full equal' headquarters somewhere other than in the Puget Sound region.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with KUOW reporters Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph about the implications for cities hoping to land Amazon's second headquarters. McNichols and Adolph are co-hosts of KUOW's new podcast Prime(d).

Radke also talks with listeners about their advice to other cities hoping to reel in Amazon.

Colleen Echohawk, executive director of the Chief Seattle Club.
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Many Native people who are homeless in Seattle say they feel invisible.

“We are a city that’s named after a great chief of Suquamish-Duwamish descent, and we don’t always know and feel that in this city,” said Colleen Echohawk-Hayashi, executive director of the Chief Seattle Club. “I think that we have an issue where we don’t really want to engage in it.”

Courtesy of Washington Department of Transportation

Bill Radke speaks with Charlie Raines, director of the I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition, about the wildlife overpass that is being built east of Snoqualmie Pass on I-90.

NSF/LIGO/Sonoma State University/A. Simonnet

Bill Radke talks with astrophysicist Michael Landry about an historic collision of two neutron stars, known as a kilonova.

It's the first time scientists have observed this type of cosmic event both through electromagnetic and gravitational waves. Landry is head of the LIGO Hanford Observatory.

Flickr Photo/Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office(CC BY 2.0)/

Sex segregation is the default in sports, but why?

Nancy Leong advocates against sex segregation, saying it doesn't make sense. Take T-ball leagues for four year-olds. Girls play on separate teams, though it’s not clear why.

This week's panel (L-R): Bill Radke, Joni Balter, Sydney Brownstone, C.R. Douglas

This week rape and sexual harassment got a very public face when we learned that Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein is accused of raping several women. He’s been settling sexual harassment claims for decades, and many, many people knew about it and said nothing.

Author Raj Patel said that, among other things, we don't pay enough for our food.
Flick Photo/Jo Ann Deasy (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Seattle (or Amazon-town, if you prefer) is ground zero for cheap things. Amazon has built a world-altering business out of discounting products online.


And author Raj Patel says that’s not a good thing. logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Casey Coombs, reporter at the Puget Sound Business Journal, about Amazon's rapid growth over the last decade and what the company's playbook is for getting cities to offer incentives and deals to open fulfillment and data centers in their region. Coombs' reporting is a part of a series The Business Journals' have published called "The Amazon Effect: How taxpayers are funding the disruption of the U.S. economy."

Bill Radke speaks with Steven Agen, Seattle editor of Prost Amerika and host of the podcast Radio Cascadia, about the causes and fall out of the U.S. Men's National Soccer team failing to make it into the World Cup in Russia in 2018. 

Nathan Cultee dumps 16 farm-raised Atlantic salmon into a container on Tuesday, August 22, 2017, at Home Port Seafood in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, The Seattle Times environment reporter, about Washington's disappearing salmon population and what it says about the health of our coast and Puget Sound.  

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

You need a to pack a lot more than a granola bar when you head out on a day hike.


Bill Radke talked with Taylor Brugh, vice president of Seattle Mountain Rescue, and Sandeep Nain, owner of the Redmond-based guiding company Miyar Adventures, about how to stay safe in the mountains — even if you’re just planning to be out for a few hours.


KUOW PHOTO/ Kara McDermott

This week one man killed 58 and wounded hundreds of people in Las Vegas using legal weapons — semiautomatic rifles modified with devises that make them act more like machine guns. Will this shooting change our gun laws? 

Frances Lee at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Frances Lee recently asked to be excommunicated from the church of social justice.

Lee, who is queer, trans and Chinese-American, was trying to point out the intolerance of the social justice movement. In an article that went viral earlier this year, they chose the headline “Excommunicate Me from the Church of Social Justice.”

Zoë Quinn at IndieCade in 2015.
Flickr Photo/IndieCade (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Zoë Quinn is an avid gamer, developer, and artist. In her capacity as author and advocate, she’s launched an online crisis network and spoken before the UN.

But you probably know her best from #GamerGate.