Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

baby kid
Flickr Photo/Tamaki Sono (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/224maX

Bill Radke speaks with artist, poet and mother of two, Natasha Marin, about the realization that she didn't have to become a mother. She says motherhood seemed like something she was always just supposed to do.

Radke also speaks with poet and curator Imani Sims about her decision to not have any kids.

Marin's story and this conversation on motherhood first appeared in an article by the Seattle Times.

Houses in Queen Anne
Flickr Photo/Harold Hollingsworth (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9C1rMq

Bill Radke talks to Denise Rodriguez, the deputy director of Washington Homeownership Resource Center, and Skylar Olsen, a senior economist at Zillow, about what makes the Puget Sound real estate market so competitive and how people are able to find and afford housing. 

Tiffany Rogers, a sister of Charleena Lyles, speaks during a vigil on Tuesday, June 19, 2017, at Solid Ground Brettler Family Place, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Patricia Murphy about the latest updates on the fatal Seattle police shooting of Charleena Lyles Sunday morning. 

Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler
Flickr photo/Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/K52qFP

Bill Radke talks to Mike Kreidler, insurance commissioner for Washington state, about the numbers released on insurance premiums for plans in the health care insurance exchange. 

Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison on the floor of the Republican convention in Cleveland in 2016.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Bill Radke talks Susan Hutchison, the chairman of the Washington State Republican Party, about how national issues play locally with the Republican base. 

Candles surround a photograph of Charleena Lyles after a vigil was held at Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Tuesday, June 19, 2017, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Reporter Patricia Murphy talks to Bill Radke about the fatal police shooting of 30-year-old Charleena Lyles that happened in her apartment near Magnuson Park Sunday morning. 

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is leaving the door open for a write-in campaign after a Kent man drops a civil lawsuit alleging Murray sexually abused him three decades ago.

The state constitution says Seattle can't tax the rich, but the City Council still wants an income tax for people making more than $250,000 a year.

Bill Radke talks to Peg Coleman, who runs the Domestic Abuse Women's Network, about why so many mass shooters have a history of domestic violence and what we miss when domestic violence isn't in the conversation around mass violence. 

View of Mt. Rainier from the Paradise parking lot.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

"Only by going alone in silence, without baggage, can one truly get into the heart of the wilderness," that's what the famous naturalist John Muir said. Sounds like Muir would not want his cell phone to work at Mount Rainier National Park.

But the park service wants to know what you think about a proposal to add cell service at Mount Rainier's Paradise Visitors Center. Public comment is open now.

KUOW producer Matt Martin explains to host Bill Radke about what people visiting Paradise think about the proposal. 

The Seattle City Council will likely pass an income tax in July, aimed at income above $250,000 for a single filer (above $500,000 for those filing jointly).

Bill Radke speaks with Katie Wilson of the Transit Riders Union and Trump-Proof Seattle Coalition, who supports the tax, hoping that it leads to more economic equity in the city and pays for needed services. She also believes that the 2 percent tax is nominal for citizens, though it will potentially raise $125 million.  

Also in the studio, Matt McIlwain from the Madrona Venture Group disagrees with the tax, concerned it will discourage high-earners from moving to Seattle or remaining in city limits. He also notes that while the income tax is aimed at only certain people now, history shows that taxes like this often wind up being spread to a much larger population. 

Bill Radke talks with Cliff Mass, professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington, about climate change and what he perceives to be exaggeration on the environmental left.

Mass says he believes the environmental left is trying to boost social justice by connecting it to global warming and that some things happening today are normal, natural events that have no connection to man-made climate change.

He also says there is a chance for a bipartisan approach to address climate change, but there must be a greater focus on reasoned debate. 

Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about why he sponsored a resolution saying Seattle will uphold the Paris Climate Agreement and how city leaders can get the city to reduce its carbon footprint. 

The Watergate building in Washington D.C.
Flickr Photo/Rudi Riet (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/2FEW1m

Bill Rakde talks to Joseph Janes, associate professor in the University of Washington Information School, about why he includes the 18 and a half minutes of static recording from the Nixon tapes in his new book "Documents that Changed the Way We Live."

You can hear his podcast Documents that Changed the World.

Author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie waits with dancers backstage for his turn on stage as the keynote speaker at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday, Oct. 10, 2016, at Seattle's City Hall.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

In Sherman Alexie’s deeply personal memoir, “You Don't Have to Say You Love Me,” he tells the story of growing up as the son of Lillian Alexie on the Spokane Indian Reservation.

Megan Farmer / KUOW

Bill Radke talks with Dr. Willie Parker about how to have an honest disagreement about abortion.

Key Arena is home court for Sue Bird, a 9 time WNBA All-Star
Seattle Storm

Bill Radke speaks with Wally Walker, former general manager of the Seattle Sonics, about his support for a plan to build a NBA and NHL arena in Sodo.

However, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray chose an investor group to renovate KeyArena. He said he wants hockey and basketball in Seattle Center, not Sodo. 

Has the city now abandoned the Sodo idea? Walker says no.

Debate: How should we fund education?

Jun 7, 2017

Bill Radke talks with Northwest News Network's Austin Jenkins about why lawmakers in Olympia need to agree on education funding before they can agree on a budget.

We also hear from Liv Finne and Misha Werschkul about the two plans the state Legislature is considering to fund education. Finne is director of Center for Education at the Washington Policy Center and Werschkul is executive director of the Washington State Budget and Policy Center.

Seven Gabels Theatre in Seattle's University District
Flickr Photo/ javacolleen (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/31fDJf

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Sean Nelson, arts and music editor at The Stranger, about the closing of two Landmark movie theaters in Seattle, Guild 45th and Seven Gables Theatre.  

Bill Radke talks with Ashley Ahearn, host of KUOW's terrestrial podcast, about about one of the more personal decisions we make around climate change: whether or not to bring children into the world.

Brett Lowell/Courtesy of Viking/Penguin Books

Tommy Caldwell understands risk and adventure better than most. Two years ago, he became the first person to free climb the Dawn Wall of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park.

The wall is more than half a mile of sheer, vertical granite — and Caldwell made the climb with nothing but a rope tied around his waist.

Bill Radke speaks with Jeff Lew, a father of three who wanted to see if he could put an end to lunch shaming in the city -- that is the different ways schools punish children who have unpaid lunch debt. While that can range from having your meal thrown away to being stamped, Lew has been raising money to pay off as much lunch debt as he can. And he is hoping this will lead to legislation so every student, no matter what, can enjoy a hot lunch. 

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

Two men are killed on a Portland light rail train by a passenger on a racist, xenophobic rant.

File photo. apartment housing apt door
Flickr Photo/Matthew Piatt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Jessa Lewis and Sean Flynn about a new lawsuit against the cap on move-in fees that was enacted in Seattle.

Flynn, the board president of landlord group Rental Housing Association that filed the suit, argues that the law harms smaller landlords, the last people in the city keeping housing reasonably affordable.

Lewis, the executive director of the Tenants Union of Washington state, claims that the caps are reasonable and these kinds of laws are all that allow people to still live in the city. 

Cassie Chinn is the Deputy Executive Director of the Wing Luke Museum and Tam Nguyen is the owner of Tamarind Tree in Chinatown-International District
KUOW Photo/ Amina Al-Sadi

Bill Radke talks to Cassie Chinn, deputy executive director of the Wing Luke Museum, and Tam Nguyen, the owner of Tamarind Tree, about how Chinatown-International District is changing and what might be lost as the area faces the pressure of new development.  

Bill Radke talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about the City of Tacoma's plans to address homelessness.

Micah Fletcher, a victim of a stabbing attack on a light rail train that left two dead, watches as suspect Jeremy Christian is arraigned in Multnomah County Circuit Court in Portland, Ore., Tuesday, May 30, 2017.
Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian via AP, Pool

Prof. Cheryl Kaiser of the University of Washington discusses the bystander effect and whether to step into a dangerous situation to help a stranger.  

Courtesy of the Seattle Art Museum and Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York, © YAYOI KUSAMA, Photo: Cathy Carver

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Crosscut managing editor Florangela Davila  about two Seattle art events that change the way you experience art. Seattle Art Museum will host the popular Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit in June and the Seattle Repertory Theatre's production of "Here Lies Love" has been extended another three weeks. 

Rebecca Massey at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Rebecca Massey drove up from Oklahoma expecting to get a job, find a place and save up some money. She said she didn’t intend on being homeless.

“I know there’s some perception that people come to Seattle seeking all the resources that they give to homeless people. I didn’t come here anticipating receiving any of those services.”

Lesson #1: Don't feel wild animals. Lesson #45: Don't forget to put a card in the camera when you take a photo of your guest panel.
Flickr Photo/Richard Towell (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9TGR8V

Seattle is America's fastest-growing big city, but how does it treat those new arrivals?

President Trump's proposes budget cuts to light rail, university research and the cleanup at Hanford.

Will San Fransisco 49er Colin Kaepernick become a Seattle Seahawk? He reportedly visited the team this week and has Seattle's Socialist Councilmember Kshama Sawant in his corner.

And you wouldn't feed a lion by hand, so why do we act any differently when that lion lives in the sea? 

Bill Radke talks with Aaron Katz, who teaches health policy at the UW's School of Public Health, about his take on the American Health Care Act, what the new score from the Congressional Budget Office means for a potentially 23 million uninsured people and how Washington's failed health plan in the 90s can inform the future of health care in the country. 

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