Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke


Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

KUOW photo/Bond Huberman

After last week’s announcement by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray to put the plans for the new North Precinct building on hold, protesters interrupted a City Council meeting. What new issues are they raising with the city?

Isolde Raftery/KUOW

Bill Radke speaks with comedian Quincy Jones. In July of 2015, Jones was diagnosed with cancer and given a year to live. He had one wish: to tape an hour long stand-up special. With the help of an appearance on The Ellen Show, HBO aired his special back in May. Now, Jones is performing in his native Seattle on Friday, Sept 23 at the Neptune Theater

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Sean Liming, a Capitol Hill resident who is attending the neighborhood's first ever renters summit. At the summit, he'll be calling for renters in Capitol Hill, who make up 80 percent of the neighborhood's residents, to unite to create policy ideas to combat skyrocketing rents. 

Bill Radke talks with monologuist Mike Daisey about how Donald Trump has mastered performance to upend politics and hack journalism. It's the subject of his new one-man show, "The Trump Card."

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a long-awaited sewage treatment plant in Victoria, B.C. After decades, the saga seems to be coming to a close. Victoria looks set to build the treatment plant.
Flickr Photo/Soumit Nandi (CC BY NC ND)/

Bill Radke speaks with Julia Angwin, ProPublica reporter and author of the article "Amazon says it puts customers first. But its pricing algorithm doesn't."

When Olympia was run by (musical) women

Sep 21, 2016
The band Sleater-Kinney is one of the most famous products of the 90s punk scene in Olympia, Washington.
Flickr Photo/peta_azak (CC BY ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with Len Balli about the history of punk music in Olympia. Balli is the curator of a new exhibit at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma that displays called "A Revolution You Can Dance To." 

Bill Radke talks to Susie Lee, the co-founder and CEO of Siren, about her experience as a women in the tech industry and how she thinks we should change it. 

Bill Radke talks to Washington State University professor Deborah A. Christel about a recent study she co-authored on plus-sized women and athletic clothing. In the study, she found that a majority of plus-sized women, or women who wear the size 16 and over, had to shop in the mens' clothing section to find athletic clothing that fit them. 

Flickr Photo/Lynn Friedman (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with Benjamin K. Bergen about his new book, "What the F." In the book, Bergen explains why we find profanity so shocking, but also so appealing at the same time. Bergen is a professor of cognitive science at University of California San Diego. 

Bill Radke speaks with Subway franchisee owner David Jones about secure scheduling rules passed by the city of Seattle on Monday. Jones says the new rules will make things much harder for businesses like his. 

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Bishop, co-founder and editor of the technology news site GeekWire, about why some business and political leaders are working to create an "emerging Cascadia innovation corridor," joining the tech centers in Vancouver and Seattle.

The Duwamish River isn't naturally straight - we did that while building the city of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/King County, WA (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

Bill Radke sits down with Crosscut's Knute Berger to discuss Seattle's many massive engineering projects that it has undertaken over the years. Berger wonders what the city would have been like if we hadn't straightened the Duwamish River or gotten rid of Denny Hill: Would we have been a city at all? 

Bill Radke speaks with Josh Feit about the behind the scenes politics of the City Council vote on a new secure scheduling law. Feit is the politics editor at Seattle Met and editor of their local politics blog PubliCola. 

From left, Zaki Hamid, Eli Sanders, Ijeoma Oluo and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has announced that the plans for the new North Precinct building will be put on hold. He says the city needs to consider the cost of the building and impact it will have on communities of color. What should happen as the city re-draws the plan?