Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Flickr photo/Bill Holmes (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/tujYE

Bill Radke talks to Coral Garnick, retail reporter for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the latest move Nordstrom is making in retail and what is says about the changing industry.

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant, Washington State GOP chair Susan Hutchison, and Geekwire editor and co-founder Todd Bishop about whether or not Seattle's progressive climate has pushed Amazon to open a second headquarters outside of Seattle.

 The Natte Latte coffee stand in 1999, which launched the Pacific Northwest's sexy espresso stand trend.
Courtesy of Mary Keller Wynn

Bill Radke talks to Amelia Powell, a barista in Everett who works at Hillbilly Hotties, about the lawsuit she and fellow baristas are filing against the city of Everett over the new ordinance that would restrict the type of clothing they wear at work. The new ordinance passed unanimously in the Everett City Council and would effectively put an end to the bikini barista stands in Everett.

See that car in the middle lane zipping to the front of the line? You hate that driver, but they're actually doing the right thing, known as the zipper merge.
WSDOT

Three years ago, we ran a story about a little-known traffic tip known as the "zipper merge." 

In short: Drivers should use all lanes leading up to a merge point, rather than clog up one lane. Arrived at the front of the line, drivers in all lanes take turns merging. This is not cheating! (See image above for why the seemingly polite way gunks up traffic.) 

Author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie waits with dancers backstage for his turn on stage as the keynote speaker at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday, Oct. 10, 2016, at Seattle's City Hall.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Who better to talk sex with than self-described "old, gray-haired dads" Sherman Alexie and Daniel Handler? KUOW’s Bill Radke sat down with the two authors to talk about how adolescence has gone from treehouses in the woods to porn on phones.

'Week in Review' panel Bill Radke, Christopher Parker, Billy Bryant and Natalie Brand.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Amazon tells Seattle it wants to see other cities and announces plans for a second headquarters in another North American metropolis.

The only Republican Congressman from the Puget Sound area said this week he won't run for another term. Who will take over for Rep. Dave Reichert?

Courtesy of Leo Carmona

Bill Radke talks with Ray Corona about President Trump's decision to end the DACA program. Corona is a DACA recipient and executive director of the non-profit Somos Seattle.

An Amazon Prime truck delivers an Australian fern to Amazon’s campus for the ceremonial first planting at The Spheres on Thursday,  May 4, 2017, in Seattle.
Stephen Brashear/AP Images for Amazon

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire editor Todd Bishop and Slate Magazine tech writer April Glaser about what it could mean for Seattle that Amazon will set up a second headquarters in a different North American city. 

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

The true damage of Hurricane Harvey is still unknown, but does that mean you have to wait to criticize some of the victims?

Counter-protestors committed violence against Nazi and white supremacists in Berkeley last weekend; are they doing the right thing or only hurting their cause?

Jenny Durkan has cribbed notes from Bernie Sanders and is offering a plan for free college, but is that enough to win over the political left?

And is the accidental release of tens of thousands of farmed salmon truly a state of emergency or should we throw cold water on those warnings?

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington researcher Caleb Banta-Green with the school's alcohol and drug abuse institute. Banta-Green explains how Naloxone, the emergency overdose drug, can save a person's life in a matter of minutes. Banta-Green also explains that while Naloxone is an important tool, there are other, more important drugs and methods to fight an epidemic that claimed over 300 lives last year in King County.

Coast Guard Petty Officers 3rd Class Eric Gordon and Gavin Kershaw pilot a 16-foot flood punt boat and join good Samaritans in patrolling a flooded neighborhood in Friendswood, Texas, Aug. 29, 2017. The flood punt team from Marine Safety Unit Paducah, Ken
Flickr Photo/Coast Guard News/(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/WZGrcJ

Bill Radke speaks with Amy Costello, founder and managing editor of the Tiny Spark podcast, about why you need to be careful with the donations that you send to help with the flooding in Houston. 

Texas National Guard soldiers conduct rescue operations in flooded areas around Houston, Texas 27 August, 2017. (Photo by 1Lt. Zachary West, 100th MPAD)
Flickr Photo/The National Guard/(CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/XVUayD

Bill Radke speaks with Scott Heinze, deputy director of the Pierce County Department of Emergency Management, about the latest efforts and challenges faced by a team of first responders from Washington who went to help with the recover in Houston from Tropical Storm Harvey.

Fireflies are found in Washington but they aren't like these pictured here. The fireflies in Washington don't flash.
Flickr Photo/tsaiian/(CC BY-NC 2.0)https://flic.kr/p/rnQeE7

"Where are all the mosquitos and fireflies?" 

KUOW listener Tom Miller, originally from Minnesota, had that question for our Local Wonder team. 

University of Washington entomology professor Patrick Tobin came into the studio to answer that question. He spoke with host Bill Radke on The Record.

Bill Radke speaks with Rex Hohlbein, the creator of the BLOCK Project, a plan to house the homeless with a tiny home on every residential block of the city. It's a way, Hohlbein believes, to break down stereotypes and connect the homeless more with their community.

Radke also speaks with Kim Sherman, who owns the first backyard that will have a tiny home. She explains why she wanted to do it, her initial concerns and how she believes others can be convinced that this is the right thing to do.

Kara McDermott for KUOW

Bill Radke talks to Staff Sergeant Patricia King about how President Trump's restriction on transgender individuals from serving in the military affects their lives and jobs. King was the first infantryman to reveal she is transgender. She has been serving in the Army for 18 years and is a recipient of a Bronze Star. 

Chihuly Glass and Garden, Seattle, Washington
Flickr Photo/James Walsh (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qHQGNs

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Seattle glass artist Benjamin Moore about a lawsuit that has been filed against Dale Chihuly and how artists work with assistants to create their pieces. 

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times report Mike Rosenberg about his article that shows how Seattle has become a company town for Amazon.

Crosscut Columnist Knute Berger also joins the conversation to talk about how he has seen this same pattern with Boeing and Microsoft before.

We also hear from listener on how this change has impacted them.

Texas National Guard soldiers conduct rescue operations in flooded areas around Houston, Texas, 27 August, 2017. (Photos by 1Lt. Zachary West, 100th MPAD)
Flickr Photo/The National Guard/(CC BY 2.0)https://flic.kr/p/XVUhAK

On Sunday, as Harvey pounded Houston with record rainfall and flooding, 17 emergency responders from Washington received a call to help.


Sydney Brownstone, Bill Radke, Ron Sims, Rob McKenna
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Our panel this week:

Bill Radke @kuowradke, host
Ron Sims @simsron, retired deputy secretary of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and former King County Executive
Sydney Brownstone @sydbrownstone, reporter at The Stranger
Rob McKenna @robmckenna, former Washington state attorney general

Flickr Photo/ Kevin Hale (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5aVZD3

What will the eclipse be like for those in the Puget Sound region?  

technology computer keyboard
Flicker Photo/Leslee Lazar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There’s a stereotype of tech workers that’s been circulating for some time now. It says the programmer checklist goes something like this:

Glasses repaired with tape.

Wears shorts and sandals at all times.

Works alone, possibly from parents’ basement.

President Donald Trump talks with Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg upon his arrival on Air Force One at Charleston International Airport in North Charleston, S.C., Friday, Feb. 17, 2017.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Bill Radke talks to Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about why the CEO of Boeing stayed on President Trump's manufacturing council (until it disbanded) and how the president's tweet about Amazon will affect the company. 

Comedians Hari Kondabolu, left, and Dwayne Kennedy, right.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Dwayne Kennedy chat with KUOW's Bill Radke on the threat from North Korea, performing in front of conservative audiences and what threat Hillary Clinton would have posed to the world. 


From left, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, former Gov. Chris Gregoire and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray at the back of a helicopter overlooking a flood zone in Washington state. Story goes that only the women in the WA delegation were brave enough to scoot this far.
Courtesy of Maria Cantwell's office

"There's never a time when a woman really wins anything," says political strategist Cathy Allen.

After Seattle's 2017 mayoral race primary, Allen and University of Washington professor Cate Goethals discussed gender equity in politics and business on KUOW's The Record. 

Bill Radke talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about Seahawks player Michael Bennett's decision to sit during the national anthem at the Seahawks' first pre-season game against the San Diego Chargers. 

KUOW PHOTO/DANIEL BERMAN

"What surprises me is, quite frankly, the outrage of our white progressives who continue to be surprised. For people of color, this is our life every day."

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

Seattle is reportedly within range of a North Korean nuclear missile, and there's a war of words between President Trump and Kim Jong-Un. Should we be afraid?

Puget Sound is still tucked in beneath a smoky haze from British Columbia wildfires. But has it really "ruined summer?"

Gray wolf
Flickr Photo/USFWS Pacific Region (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, Seattle Times environment reporter, about Robert Wielgus, the Washington State University researcher whose work on cougars and wolves in Washington state angered lawmakers and ranchers and led to a loss of funding for his research and a lack of support from his employer.

Bill Radke speaks with professor Sara Rankin of Seattle University and Scott Lindsay, former public safety advisor to the mayor of Seattle, about legislation being crafted that may aim to end ticketing of cars that double as residences for their owners, which is up to 40 percent of all homeless in the city. 

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Slate tech writer April Glaser about the reasons that Google fired an engineer after he wrote a memo that questioned the ability of women to be successful in the tech industry. 

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