Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

A tent in the Jungle, a Seattle homeless encampment believed to have grown out of the original homeless hobo jungle during the Great Depression of the 1930s.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's growth and development reporter Joshua McNichols about the city's plan to close down the homeless encampment under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle and what will happen to the people that live there. 

Bill Radke speaks with Dylan Orr, director of Seattle's Office of Labor Standards, about the new secure scheduling rules proposed by the city and what they would mean for local businesses and workers. 

From left, Sydney Brownstone, Bill Radke, Ijeoma Oluo and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Seattle City Council passed a law that would prevent landlords from discriminating against potential tenants. It is another step towards preventing inequity. But can the city fix the larger issue of affordability?

Bill Radke talks with Ben and Emily Huh about why, after 11 years and one internet cat picture empire in Seattle, they're splitting town for good and moving to the Bay Area.

A conceptual rending of what the Upstream Music Fest will look like.
Courtesy of Upstream Music Fest

Bill Radke speaks with music journalist and Seattle native Ann Powers about Paul Allen's newest venture: a three-day music festival and industry conference called Upstream.

Festival organizers say they will "collide music, gaming, tech, media, design, and more to tackle today’s toughest industry challenges and open up opportunities within the new entertainment economy."

Seven Lakes Basin in Olympic National Park.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with local poet and writer Tim McNulty about what makes Olympic National Park unique to Washington state. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. McNulty is the author of "Olympic National Park:  A Natural History."

Courtesy of Colin Boyd Shafer

Earlier this month, Seattle became the third city in the country to ban gay conversion therapy. It's an issue that touches Garrard Conley close to home. He grew up in Arkansas, the son of a pastor. 

When he was 18 years old, his parents found out he was gay and gave him an ultimatum: Go to gay conversion therapy, or you are no longer a part of this family. 

Apartment buildings in Seattle
Flickr photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/peTBEw

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle landlord Hugh Brannon about a new ordinance the Seattle City Council passed this week.

The measure aims to reduce housing discrimination through a series of mechanisms, but Brannon explains why he believes certain aspects of this law are counterproductive and take the "human element" out of being a landlord.

Wendy Boglioli won bronze in the Women's 100 metres Butterfly and gold in the Women's 4 × 100 metres Freestyle Relay at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Bill Radke speaks with swimmer Wendy Boglioli about facing off against the East German women's swimming team at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

The massively powerful East German swimmers, who were later found to have been systematically doped by their government, took gold after gold in event after event. The Americans were entirely shut out -- until the last race. 

U.S. swimmer Wendy Boglioli dives in to the pool to begin the second heat in the women's 100 meter butterfly competition at the Olympic pool in Montreal, Canada, July 21, 1976.
AP Photo/Harry Cabluck

At the summer Olympics, 19-year-old American swimmer Lilly King is making headlines – and not just for winning gold.

After beating Russian swimmer Yulia Efimova, King openly condemned the Russian swim team for doping.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about how Canadians are reacting to Trump's run for the presidency. One worry is that if Trump wins the White House it will mean an end to NAFTA. 

Kate Riley's son has autism and has trouble with responding quickly to directions, a concern when dealing with police.
Courtesy of Kate Riley

Bill Radke speaks with Kate Riley, Seattle Times editorial page editor, about her recent article that explains why she worries about interactions between her autistic son and law enforcement. 

Coach Joe Kennedy.
Courtesy of First Liberty Institute

Last fall, an assistant football coach at Bremerton High School lost his job for praying on the 50-yard line after games. Now Joe Kennedy is suing to get his job back and to keep a promise he made with God. KUOW's Bill Radke spoke with Kennedy about church, state and the playing field. 

AR-15 rifle with a Stag lower receiver California legal (only with fixed 10-round magazine)
Wikimedia Commons

The day after the Orlando nightclub shooting, Tami Michaels, a Seattle talk show host, took to Facebook.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Heidi Groover of The Stranger about a new law Seattle City Council passed unanimously Monday targeting housing discrimination.

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