Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Bill Radke talks with former Seattle mayor Mike McGinn about his run to return to City Hall.

Bill Radke talks to Lauren Berliner, assistant professor of media and communication and culture studies at the University of Washington Bothell, and Nora Kenworthy, assistant professor in the school of nursing and health studies at the University of Washington Bothell, about their study on the rise of the use of crowdfunding sites as a way to pay for medical bills

Bill Radke talks with former state representative Jessyn Farrell about her run for Seattle mayor.

KUOW Photo/ Megan Farmer

In February of 2016 Andre Taylor was in L.A. when he got a phone call from his stepmom in Seattle.

She told him his little brother Che Taylor had been shot by the police. Che Taylor was standing next to the open door of a car. The two officers said he was reaching for a gun when they fired.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

State lawmakers avoid a government shutdown with a last-minute budget deal that adds billions to public education. Is it good enough for the state Supreme Court?

The Ballard Locks turn 100. We'll take up the good and the bad of a project that transformed Seattle.

Americans shot fireworks, and North Korea launched an intercontinental ballistic missile. Some experts say it could hit Alaska -- could it ever hit us?

And a Seattle driver beats a speeding ticket by convincing a judge that a traffic sign is too wordy.

A North Korean soldier looks at the southern side through a pair of binoculars at the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003.
AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle-based journalist and author Blaine Harden about the history of North Korea and the tensions between it and the U.S.

Bill Radke talks to Anna King, a journalist with the Northwest News Network, about her reporting on the Hanford tunnel collapse, including why it happened and what it means for other nuclear waste storage sites at Hanford. 

Officer John Hill and Ryan Miles, a designated mental health professional with the Tacoma Police Department.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Could Charleena Lyles still be alive today if police had not gone to her apartment alone? 

In Tacoma, an officer can call for help dealing with someone who might be mentally ill. They can call a mental health co-responder. And now, this co-responder program might go statewide.

KUOW’s Bill Radke speaks with Tacoma Patrol Officer John Hill and a mental health co-responder who works with officers – Ryan Miles.

Bill Radke speaks with Kent Boydston, a research analyst with The Peterson Institute for International Economics, about North Korea testing an intercontinental ballistic missile that could reach Alaska. Boydston discusses the details of the test, President Trump's response, and how worried we should be living in the Pacific Northwest.

Summer Stinson, lawyer and Vice President of Washington's Paramount Duty and Daniel Zavala, director of policy and government relations with the League of Education Voters.
KUOW Photo/ Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Summer Stinson, lawyer and vice president of  the parent group Washington's Paramount Duty, and Daniel Zavala, director of policy and government relations with the League of Education Voters, about the end of the latest legislative session and how much closer lawmakers got to fully funding basic education. 

The triumph and tragedy of the Ballard Locks

Jul 3, 2017
A postcard of the Ballard Locks, 1917
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ecguhZ

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes about the 100-year anniversary of the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks, also known as the Ballard Locks.

Mapes discusses how truly transformational the Locks were, for both good and ill. She details the ways in which the city was reshaped in ways that were only possibly because of the Locks. But she also discusses the human cost and how the oppressed Native American population was even further harmed by this progress. 

Manette, seen here from the ferry, is one of the few Bremerton neighborhoods with an active association. Bremerton Neighborhoods Now! would like more neighborhoods to join their ranks.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Marie Vila, co-chair of Bremerton Neighborhoods Now!, about why she thinks block parties, potlucks and "crappy dinner parties" are what Bremerton needs right now. 

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Bill Radke speaks with Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about some of the reasons cannabis retail shops in Washington are having a hard time making a profit

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray makes it official: He won't run as a write-in for a second term, and wants you to vote for former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan instead.

Flickr Photo/Tony Swartz (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Joseph O'Sullivan, Seattle Times Olympia reporter, about the latest information on the state budget deal that Republicans and Democrats reached on Wednesday. 

music concert
FLICKR PHOTO/Avarty Photos (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ffNvCc

You're living in a region with tons of good, new, local music. Too much to take it all in, so Bill Radke speaks with Jonathan Zwickel, who writes a City Arts Magazine column called Attractive Singles. Zwickel has picked out three local artists for you to get to know.

Bill Radke speaks with Jorge Baron, executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, about the partial travel ban that went into effect. Baron talks about the chaos that he dealt with during the surprise January ban  and how he anticipates a much les problematic situation this time. He also explains his own issues with the partial ban and what he hopes will be resolved by the Supreme Court case this fall. 

Homeless RV
Flickr Photo/A. Kwanten (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Bv6MSo

Robert Loomis had a good job and had just signed a mortgage on a new home then he started having chest pains. This is his story.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Bill Radke talks to Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the budget deal reached by lawmakers just in time to avoid a partial government shutdown. 

Joni Balter and Cathy Allen.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Why hasn’t Seattle had a woman mayor since 1928, when Bertha K. Landes was in office?

(Her slogan: Municipal Housecleaning.)

What local chefs think about food appropriation

Jun 27, 2017
Chefs Edouardo Jordan and Rachel Yang
KUOW Photo/Shane Mehling

Bill Radke speaks with Edouardo Jordan and Rachel Yang, chefs and Seattle restaurant owners. In light of two Portland women shutting down a burrito cart after being accused of food appropriation, Jordan and Yang discuss how they view culture and the sanctity of food. They also explain how they have been inspired by other cultures to create their signature dishes. 

Bill Radke talks with Aaron Katz, who teaches health policy the University of Washington School of Public Health, and retired physician Roger Stark, a healthcare analyst for the Washington Policy Center.

They discuss the current healthcare bill being debated in the Senate and the Congressional Budget Office score that predicts 22 million fewer Americans will have insurance by 2026.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke talks with KUOW immigration reporter Liz Jones about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to hear arguments this fall on President Trump's revised travel ban. The high court also allowed portions of the travel ban to take effect beginning on Thursday.

Bill Radke speaks with Ben Casselman, chief economics writer at FiveThirtyEight.com, and Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant about the new minimum wage study from the University of Washington.

Casselman explains that the study found Seattle's minimum wage hike to $13 has led to hours cut and other issues that have hurt workers' earnings.

Sawant disagrees with the study, claiming there are methodological issues. She also argues for shifting the focus towards the inflated incomes of CEOs and other high-wage earners. 

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

Seattle looks for answers after two SPD officers fatally shoot 30-year-old mother of four Charleena Lyles in her home, after officers say she threatened them with knives.

A new KUOW/KING 5 poll finds former Seattle mayor Mike McGinn leading a crowded field ahead of the August 1 primary election, with former US Attorney Jenny Durkan close behind.

Seattle mayor Ed Murray looks to help people with criminal convictions get an apartment in the city, with some landlords saying they're losing even more control over who they can rent to.

And is it ever your job to enforce the rules of the road? We learn from a case of Subaru-versus-Jeep road rage in Kent.

Bill Radke speaks with Augustine Cita of the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle and Sean Flynn, board president of the Rental Housing Association of Washington, to discuss the new Fair Chance Housing law proposed by Mayor Ed Murray. 

David Schmader at KUOW.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with David Schmader about the essay he wrote for KUOW's Seattle Story Project titled, "My teacher abused me. I didn’t realize it until 20 years later."

In high school, Schmader was one of the theater kids. He even convinced his parents to let some family friends become his legal guardian so he could go to a school 20 miles away where they had one of the best speech and drama programs in all of Texas. He would rehearse before school, after school, during lunch.

He even started taking private lessons from one of his teachers. Schmader ended up having his first sexual experience with this man. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Ijeoma Oluo, editor at large of The Establishment, and Eula Scott Bynoe, co-host of HellaBlackHellaSeattle, about the conversations they've been having in the wake of the shooting of Charleena Lyles. 

The Slants
Courtesy of The Slants

Bill Radke speaks with Simon Tam of Portland band The Slants and Robert Chang, professor of law at the Seattle University School of Law, about the Supreme Court decision that allowed Tam's Asian-American band to trademark their name, which some argued was too offensive for the designation.

Tam explains how he feels this decision allows people to empower themselves against slurs and thinks this is a huge win for social justice.

Professor Chang disagrees with the SCOTUS decision, claiming that this could open the doors to discriminatory  trademarks that slip past civil rights laws. He also argues that trademarking names may in fact harm future social justice movements. 

What can prevent tragedies like Charleena Lyles?

Jun 21, 2017

Bill Radke talks with former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper and state Representative Morgan Irwin, also a Seattle police officer, about the shooting of Charleena Lyles by Seattle police and what, if anything, could have been done to prevent it.

Irwin says the officers followed proper protocol during a tragic, isolated incident. Stamper says it points to larger problems of implicit bias and how police perceive danger on the job. 

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