Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

KUOW PHOTO/DANIEL BERMAN

"What surprises me is, quite frankly, the outrage of our white progressives who continue to be surprised. For people of color, this is our life every day."

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

Seattle is reportedly within range of a North Korean nuclear missile, and there's a war of words between President Trump and Kim Jong-Un. Should we be afraid?

Puget Sound is still tucked in beneath a smoky haze from British Columbia wildfires. But has it really "ruined summer?"

Gray wolf
Flickr Photo/USFWS Pacific Region (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, Seattle Times environment reporter, about Robert Wielgus, the Washington State University researcher whose work on cougars and wolves in Washington state angered lawmakers and ranchers and led to a loss of funding for his research and a lack of support from his employer.

Bill Radke speaks with professor Sara Rankin of Seattle University and Scott Lindsay, former public safety advisor to the mayor of Seattle, about legislation being crafted that may aim to end ticketing of cars that double as residences for their owners, which is up to 40 percent of all homeless in the city. 

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Slate tech writer April Glaser about the reasons that Google fired an engineer after he wrote a memo that questioned the ability of women to be successful in the tech industry. 

Bill Radke speaks with Shankar Narayan, technology and liberty director of the ACLU, and Ron Hosko, president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund, about sureveillance by Seattle Police.

A new City Council ordinance requires greater oversight from the public over what kind of technology used for surveillance can be used by law enforcement.

Narayan believes this is a great first step in creating more public trust and providing people with more privacy, though he would like to see it go even further. Hosko believes that this kind of public scrutiny weakens a police force's ability to strategize and less access to tech may strain resources.

The Burien City Council. (Back row) Councilmember Debi Wagner, Councilmember Austin Bell, Councilmember Stephen Armstrong, Councilmember Bob Edgar. (Front row) Mayor Lucy Krakowiak, Deputy Mayor Nancy Tosta, Councilmember Lauren Berkowitz.
Official photograph

Bill Radke talks with Craig Keller and Pedro Olguin about a Burien city ordinance meant to protect immigrants. The ordinance makes it illegal for city employees to ask residents about their immigration status.

On Monday, the Burien City Council voted to put Ordinance 651 up to a public vote this November.

Mountain Goats are not native to the Olympic Peninsula. The Parks Service is deciding how to manage the population.
Flickr Photo/ld_germain (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/LM9e5

Bill Radke speaks with Rob Smith, the Northwest regional director of the National Parks Conservation Association, about the Olympic National Park's plan to either kill or relocate the estimated 625 non-native mountain goats in the park. The goats are seen as a hassle for hikers and a threat to native plant and animal life.

We also hear from Rachel Bjork, a board member with Northwest Animal Rights Network, about why she thinks the animals shouldn't be killed or moved. 

The National Parks Service will be taking public comment until September 26. You can fill out the survey at their site.

Phillip Chavira and Shontina Vernon
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Phillip Chavira, executive director of Intiman Theatre in Seattle, and Shontina Vernon, Seattle writer and musician, about what makes art inclusive.

Registered nurse Sammy Mullally holds a tray of supplies to be used by a drug addict at the Insite safe injection clinic in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday May 11, 2011.
AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Darryl Dyck

Bill Radke speaks with Bellevue Mayor John Stokes about why the city is set to ban safe injection sites from the city. King County has said that it will create to sites where drugs users can go and safely use drugs under medical supervision. 

Marty Jackson
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

Marty Jackson runs the Southeast Area Network of the Seattle Youth Violence Prevention Initiative. For years, she had worked with Stephan Stewart, trying to keep him off the streets.

And her efforts appeared to be working.


Through the smokey haze and in an air conditioned building, Chris Vance, Cathy Allen, Bill Radke and Erica Barnett.
KUOW Photo/ Kara McDermott

Are you hot? We're hot. It's hot. Not as hot as it could be because of the smoke from British Columbia's wildfires, but we're still in a heat wave with temperatures in the 90s. 

Bill Radke speaks with Eugene Volokh and Dr. Jim Sulton Jr. about race-based college admissions.

Washington state passed a law in 1998 that prevented colleges from using affirmative action. Sulton says that the law has harmed students of color by sending a message that they are not welcome, and that affirmative action allows for a more diverse campus.

Volokh argues that studies show affirmative action has harmed students of all races by shifting the focus away from education and creates divisions between different groups.

Volokh is a law school professor at UCLA and Sulton is the former executive director of the Higher Education Coordinating Board. 

Comedian Hari Kondabolu at the Museum Theatre in Chennai on January 5, 2012.
Flickr Photo/US Consulate Chennai (CC BY-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/b8hDHa

Bill Radke talks to comedians Liz Miele and Hari Kondabolu about representation and race in comedy. Is it okay to make fun of Anthony Scaramucci? What's the problem with the Simpson's character Apu?  

Elisa Chavez (left) and Ian Martinez (right) are slam poets in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Ian Martinez and Elisa Chavez about identity and slam poetry. The duo are members of the Rain City Poetry Slam. They will be competing at the national slam poetry competition in Denver on August 12. 

Sunset from Gas Works Park, Seattle, August 3, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

There are more than 20 wildfires burning in British Columbia right now, but that’s just one reason why the air in Seattle is junk right now.

Bill Radke speaks with hydroplane drivers Brent Hall and Jerry Hopp about their love of racing. Hall speaks about his childhood dreams of being behind the wheel of a hydroplane and what it was like to start racing at the age of 36. Hopp talks about his long hydroplane career, racing for almost fifty years. And both of them explain some of the finer points of Seafair's most popular sport. 

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to Sen. Patty Murray about the hearings she has planned with Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander. They hope to come up with a bipartisan fix to the Affordable Care Act. 

Are President Trump's critics too outraged?

Jul 31, 2017

Bill Radke speaks with Tom Nichols, professor of national security affairs at the U.S. Naval War College. He explains why he thinks, as a Trump critic, that he feels critics spend too much time being outraged about every aspect of the President's agenda, diluting their message and emboldening Trump supporters.

Also, as the author of the book, "The Death of Expertise," Nichols discusses why he feels that anti-intellectualism has become pervasive in America and how it threatens countless aspects of the culture.

KUOW Photo/ Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Seafair's King Neptune, John Roderick, and Queen Alcyone, Angela Shen, about the cultural resonance of this decades old festival. Roderick is a Seattle musician and Shen is the founder and CEO of Savor Seattle Food Tours, in their day jobs.

laptop keyboard
Flickr Photo/Ian D (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/coVLZb

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Lynn Thompson about her article that looks into how law enforcement took down a prostitution ring in Bellevue. 

KUOW PHOTO/Kara McDermott

Health care reform didn't make it out of the Senate, the military said it won't be taking action yet on the President's tweets about transgender service members and Congress passed a set of sanctions against Russia despite what President Trump has said about sanctioning Russia. So just how powerful is the  president? 

Parking in Seattle could become a thing of the past.
Flickr Photo/James Callan (CC BY NC SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4mBfBq


Tired of circling the block looking for parking in Seattle? Donald Shoup, a UCLA professor and author of the book, “The High Cost of Free Parking,” says the city can solve that problem by charging more.

Courtesy of Rick Fienberg TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel

Bill Radke talks to former NPR reporter David Baron about why he believes everyone should witness a full solar eclipse in their lifetime. Baron also talks about his new book "American Eclipse" that tells the story of the 1878 full solar eclipse that stretched across the American West and drew the nation's scientists and eclipse chasers. 

Bill Radke speaks with Hailey, the head of 3rd Gender Washington, a group pushing for driver's licenses and other documents to feature a third gender option: an X, meaning no gender is specified. Hailey says that she is non-binary, living in a small Washington town, and is not completely out to her family and neighbors. She wants all people to have a chance to not be boxed in by gender. She also hopes this will open up a dialogue about what it means to be non-binary.

Flickr Photo/Skip&Nell (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Washington State Patrol Trooper Chase VanCleave about the new distracted driving law. Trooper VanCleave gets into the difference between primary offenses and secondary offense in the law.

President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks to reporter Patricia Murphy about what President Trump's tweets on banning transgender people from the military means for people serving in Western Washington.

Illustration by Drew Christie

Bill Radke speaks with Katherine Switz, founder and executive director of The Stability Network. The nonprofit includes professionals who give talks and workplace presentations about their own mental health diagnoses and the stigma surrounding taking a day off work for mental health. 

Jonathan Porretta and Noelani Pantastico in George Balanchine's 'Square Dance.'
Angela Sterling/Pacific Northwest Ballet

Bill Radke speaks with Manuel Cawaling,  executive director of Youth Theatre Northwest, about why he supports a ballot imitative that would increase sales tax in King County by 0.1 percent to provide more funding for arts and culture organizations.

King County Councilmember Larry Gossett also joins the conversation to lay out why he doesn't support the new tax.

Bill Radke talks to Monica Ewing, a benefits manager at Durney Insurance in Hoquiam, about how she councils her clients under the uncertainty of health care reform and why the insurance options in Grays Harbor County are so limited.  

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