Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Israeli food is more than just challah, especially for one Seattle chef.
Flickr Photo/Rebecca Siegel (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/d9DtUU

Bill Radke speaks with Michael Solomonov, the James Beard Award-winning chef of Zahav, about Israeli cuisine. Solomonov tells Radke about the cuisine's roots, where he's tried it in Seattle and how ingredients and traditions in the Pacific Northwest remind him of Israeli cooking.

Bill Radke shows off the emergency kits we have for everyone at KUOW (but that's not enough to last us in a major catastrophe).
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Tom Martin, founding member of the American Preppers Network, about why he has an emergency supply of food and water. Martin also talks about why people need to be prepared for any natural disaster. 

Brandie Osborne, a resident of the Jungle, speaks at a KUOW event at Seattle Public Library about the city's plan to partner with the Union Gospel Mission to clear out the Jungle.
Courtesy of Seattle Public Library/Alex Garland

Bill Radke speaks with Jeff Lilley, head of the Union Gospel Mission, about their outreach efforts in the homeless encampment known as the Jungle. UGM is partnering with the city of Seattle to help provide services before the encampment is cleared out. 

Amazon cracks down on fake customer reviews

Jun 7, 2016
Todd Bishop and KUOW's Bill Radke geek out over nausea-free virtual reality in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire editor Todd Bishop about Amazon suing over fake reviews being posted on the site. The online store is also cracking down on people who pay for fake positive reviews.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke speaks with Josh Feit about a heated text message exchange between Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw concerning the city's response to the homeless encampment known as the Jungle. Feit is the political editor for Seattle Met magazine and writes the local politics blog, Publicola. 

Microphone in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

We'll give you an update on the oil train derailment and fire along the Columbia River. And then, we'll look at the safety concerns rising form that crash. Also, what does the union gospel mission do when it goes to the Jungle and the homeless people there don't want their gospel. And we talk so much about accommodating Seattle's growth -- but why? Why do we have to grow? What would happen if we said -- stop.


Bill Radke, second from left, said he was sick of frozen smiles. And Melanie McFarland, next to him, pointed out that crazy bouquet that's been sitting in our green room. Far left, former Mayor Mike McGinn. And far left, Seattle Channel's Joni Balter.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Yeah, those flowers are amazing. But this week!

Seattle city Councilmember Tim Burgess is proposing new regulation on short-term rentals that would affect how people rent on sites like Airbnb and VRBO. He sees it as one the fixes to the affordable housing crisis in the city. Is it fair to fix Seattle’s housing crisis at the expense of short term renters?

Pioneer Square apartment listed at $130/night on Airbnb.
Courtesy of Airbnb

Bill Radke hosts a discussion between Rebecca Saldana, executive director of Puget Sound Sage, and Michelle Acquavella, owner of Sea to Sky Rentals,  about proposed legislation before the Seattle City Council that would tighten the regulations around short term rental websites like Airbnb or VRBO.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the growing number of homeless people in Vancouver, B.C. and what the city is doing to solve the issue. 

The entrance to a homeless shelter on Third Avenue in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Seattle’s homeless shelters don’t work for some people. They have curfews, you can’t stay with your partner, there’s nowhere for your stuff and most won’t take pets.

It’s a problem for many of Seattle’s homeless. But what if we changed the shelter model to get rid of some of these barriers?


BOSTON TERRIER, 2014 Gouache on cotton 25 x 32 inches
Courtesy of Greg Kucera Gallery, Seattle

Bill Radke gets recommendations of what art to see in Seattle this June from Jen Graves, art critic for The Stranger. She recommends seeing Time to Take a Walk at Greg Kucera gallery. Graves also recommends 100% Kanekalon at the Northwest African American Museum.

Forterra/Florangela Davila

Bill Radke speaks with Gene Duvernoy, president and CEO of Forterra, and Estela Ortega, executive director of El Centro de la Raza, about why their organizations are teaming up to create affordable housing and what building apartments has to do with saving the environment.

The mask and costume of the 'Gorn,' a fictionalized species featured on 'Star Trek: The Original Series.'
Courtesy of Brady Harvey/EMP Museum

Fifty years ago, a new television series took us to space to touch on topics that were perhaps too challenging to discuss frankly back on Earth. 

Star Trek: The Original Series premiered in 1966, and since then it's spun off into countless other television series, movies and more. 

Has Seattle declared a war on cars?

May 26, 2016
Traffic on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1irsJLd

Bill Radke speaks with Brier Dudley about his recent column in the Seattle Times about what he argues is Mayor Ed Murray's attack on single occupancy cars. Also, Tom Fucoloro from the Seattle Bike Blog joins the conversation. He wrote a response to Dudley's article here.

Flickr Photo/Vox Efx (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Princeton University political science professor Christopher Achen about his research into how Americans make up their minds when casting a ballot.

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